CNN reporter Bill Weir appeared on New Day Thursday morning, ahead of the premiere of the network's documentary series, Pope: The Most Powerful Man in History. Weir had just compiled a report focusing on Pope Francis and Syrian refugees and, along with co-hosts Alisyn Camerota and Chris Cuomo, seemed to agree that the seriesprovided the perfect platform to advocate for open borders.



On Friday morning, CNN anchors were freaking out as President Donald Trump used the occasion of record-low temperatures on the East Coast to take a jab at global warming theory. On CNN's Early Start program, co-host Dave Briggs repeatedly called Trump's tweet "bizarre," and CNN's New Day also dealt with the story in the first half hour of the show.



On Thursday's New Day on CNN, substitute host Bill Weir gave former Obama advisor Dr. Zeke Emanuel a mostly unchallenged forum to complain about how Republicans are handling the health insurance issue. Weir even opened the segment by relaying Democratic talking points that Republicans are behaving like "Ebenezer Scrooges" before Christmas and endangering "nine million Tiny Tim" children because a deal has not yet been reached on federal funding of the CHIP program.

 



CNN’s left-wing show host Bill Weir was a guest on the November 17 episode of Netflix’s Chelsea, titled “Singing, Storms and Stoned Spelling.” His show, Wonder List, takes him around the world, so standard liberal talking points were flying as Chelsea Handler interviewed him.



In the moments after CNN first reported Thursday afternoon that the U.S. military dropped the “mother of all bombs” on an ISIS tunnel in Afghanistan, their Wonderlist host Bill Weir complained about the bomb’s significance, claiming in a tweet that it marked a sign of  “desperation” by the U.S. that won’t have an impact on destroying ISIS.



As Donald Trump is inaugurated the 45th president today, it’s not likely that the three networks will suggest that seagulls were “awed” by the “sacred” event, one that “pilgrims” trekked to Washington to see. But that happened on January 20, 2009 as Barack Obama became the 44th president. ABC, CBS and NBC reporters were beside themselves and compared the event to a religious experience. 



Millions of Americans will celebrate Donald Trump’s inauguration on Friday, but the vast majority of journalists probably won’t be among them — and it’s not their scrupulous “objectivity,” or a unique aversion to Trump’s personal style, that keeps them from joining the party. Reviewing the media’s inauguration coverage since 1989 finds that incoming Republican presidents receive little of the worshipful coverage that’s accompanied the ascension of Democratic presidents. Instead, journalists measure new presidents using their standard liberal yardstick.



CNN's The Wonder List with Bill Weir devoted a large portion of its latest episode on Sunday to Iceland's high rate of unwed mothers and "unique sexual politics" that include a significant decline in marriage.



Since newly announced presidential candidate Rand Paul first arrived on the national scene, as part of the Tea Party wave of 2010, the Kentucky Republican Senator has been depicted as a racist, sexist and heartless slasher of programs for the poor by the liberal media.



[Update, 5:24 p.m. Thursday: Weir did issue an apology on Thursday afternoon with a tweet saying that: "My glop of Midwestern guilt stuck in my chest prob won't go away until I apologize to @foxnation for name-calling. Dumb Move. My bad."]

Late Thursday morning, Mediaite’s Eddie Scarry came across a particularly disparaging tweet that CNN anchor Bill Weir tweeted out to his over 49,500 followers Wednesday evening regarding a link on the website Fox Nation about Al Gore and global warming. In commenting about the Fox Nation post, he referred to Fox as "you willfully ignorant f***sticks."

[WARNING: UNCENSORED STRONG LANGUAGE BELOW]



Nightline, the show born out a crisis in the Middle East, has devolved into a superficial, tabloid-heavy program that has hardly bothered with the growing crisis in Syria and Barack Obama's handling of it. Since August 21, the program has allowed a mere four segments (18 minutes and eight seconds).

In contrast, Nightline has devoted over 24 minutes to light-weight topics such as the Amish Mafia TV show, a full report on the best summer songs of all time. Other stories include a look at "color runs" (a "fun" race in which joggers have paint thrown at them.) Another segment profiled James Dyson, the man who made vacuum cleaners "sexy."



The military trial of Fort Hood shooter Nidal Hasan began Tuesday, with the government arguing that the onetime Army psychiatrist was motivated by “a jihad duty to kill as many soldiers as possible,” while Hasan —  representing himself —  seemed to agree, arguing: “Evidence will clearly show that I am the shooter and the dead bodies will show the war is an ugly thing.”

But in the hours and days after the November 5, 2009 shooting that killed 13 soldiers and wounded more than two dozen others, liberal journalists resisted the idea that this episode was part of the broader war on terrorism and openly fretted about how everyday Americans would respond to news that a Muslim soldier had committed such a massacre. As NPR’s Nina Totenberg mourned at the time: “It really is tragic that he was a Muslim.”

Here are some of the quotes MRC/NewsBusters gathered at the time: