Early this week, in an MSNBC interview, Tavis Smiley said that there's far too much attention being paid to "cop killers" and not enough to "killer cops."

Then, in a Tuesday USA Today column, he cast his sympathetic lot with Gavin Long, who killed three Baton Rouge police offices on Sunday before a police sharpshooter killed him. Smiley told readers that we should "Listen to the Baton Rouge police killer." Later in the week, he interviewed Corine Woodley, Long's mother, on his PBS show. Woodley's own words indicated that what caused her son to snap was that he bought into both the lies of the violent Black Lives Matter movement and the left's obsession with "the one percent."



Some high-powered celebrities are joining the fight against the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) alongside digital advocacy group Fight for the Future. Fight for the Future is organizing a series of summer events, including protests and free concerts.



Apparently the statute of limitation on when it’s okay for Hollywood to turn on its once celebrated and heralded fellow leftist travelers and call them terrorists is about four years.



During an article posted Tuesday by Jim Romenesko on his website, the retired newsman relayed what happened when David Sze -- a member of Arianna Huffington's research staff -- got more than he bargained for last week when he contacted professional journalist Laurel Lipton, asking to use information she had reported in a book the co-founder of the liberal Huffington Post is in the process of writing, with the promise of citing that research.

Lipton responded angrily, stating: “The rapacious Ms. Huffington seems to believe that journalism skills are worth nothing, and that my beleaguered colleagues and I should be thrilled to help her make hundreds of millions of dollars in return for 'exposure.'”



Time was, burning an American flag was a reliable way of getting on network TV, there to shock the taxpayers over their TV dinners.

But these days, the network news programs don’t seem interested in American flag desecration, unless it happens in the Middle East. In the last five years, there have been only two mentions of domestic flag desecration on ABC, CBS and NBC. Both of those were on ABC.



Those who rail at Fox News for allegedly being a haven of unbridled, uninterrupted conservatism usually and conveniently fail to remember that Shepard Smith is there.

Smith's take yesterday on the potential pitfalls of a thaw in U.S.-Cuba relations, particularly on the commercial front, was nothing short of astonishing. His primary fear, expressed in an interview with Gerri Willis of the Fox Business Network, is that the new arrangements might "ruin the place." It would be "the last thing they need" to see "Taco Bell and Lowes" locations there. Smith also posed as a market analyst, wondering if the Dow was up 300 points because of President Obama's related announcement. Video (HT Mediaite and PJ Media's Ed Driscoll) and a transcript follow the jump:



CNN's Twitter account on Thursday boosted a Rolling Stone article that hyped the far-left Occupy Wall Street movement's latest efforts. The social media post touted, "Think #OccupyWallStreet is dead? Think again. This short-lived occupation is still fighting for five key issues," and linked to Rebecca Nathanson's Wednesday piece on the "five campaigns that OWS-inspired groups have continued to fight for since the movement's presumed conclusion."



Occupy Wall Street is now suing one of its leaders for taking over its Twitter account and locking out the activists. They also suspect him of financial improprieties.

No surprise since that leader, Justin Wedes, was earlier exposed as a scam artist forger who tried to cheat taxpayers to fraudulently obtain a government grant.
 



Salon.com apparently get can't get enough of former Occupy Wall Street participants, as the website featured far-left "journalist" Jesse Myerson on Sunday. Myerson, who infamously pushed for socialism in a January 2014 piece in Rolling Stone, listed seven supposed "huge misconceptions" about communism, and tried to whitewash the tens of millions butchered in the name of the discredited ideology.

The left-wing website's Twitter account heralded the writer's piece as "the best possible way to shut down your right-wing colleague railing against the ills of communism." Myerson, who includes a #FULLCOMMUNISM hashtag on his own Twitter profile, offered his beyond optimistic vision for a Marxist future:



A 6 p.m. Google News search on "Occupy Movement" (not in quotes, sorted by date) returned 69 items dated September 16 and 17.

The same search adding the word "capitalism" returned only two items. This is odd, because, as one of the two items returned noted, "capitalism" — as in ending it — is the core platform of the few who remain involved with the two year-old movement.



Hoping to breath some new life and some fresh drama into the minimum wage issue, Time magazine foresees the handful of fast-food strikes going "viral" tomorrow.

"Fast Food Strikes Go Viral: Workers Expected to Protest Low Wages in 35 Cities Thursday" blares the headline to Victor Luckerson's 10-paragraph August 27 post at the magazine's website. Here's how Luckerson opened his piece:



The indictment of Occupy Wall Street-connected Doctor Roberto Rivera on a number of charges, including "stashing large amounts of bomb-making materials at his home," apparently wasn't news anywhere until Friday afternoon at NorthJersey.com. The Associated Press's unbylined five-paragraph report (HT Legal Insurrection) appeared Saturday aftenoon.

Kibret Markos's Friday report noted the doctor's Occupy Wall Street sympathies ("Rivera also was quoted in a Bloomberg News report last year voicing his support for Occupy Wall Street protesters"). The AP, whose union was among OWS's most ardent supporters, did not. Instead, it "cleverly" misdirected by telling readers that "Prosecutors haven't said why Rivera had the items or what he planned to do with them." Evidence of those sympathies and of that involvement follow the jump.