On Friday's Real Time show on HBO, liberal host Bill Maher and actor Jim Carrey celebrated recent Democratic candidates running on far-left platforms and identifying themselves as "socialists," leading Carrey to proclaim: "We have to say yes to socialism -- to the word and everything. We have to stop apologizing."



Several recent polls, plus the popularity of Sen. Bernie Sanders, demonstrate that young people prefer socialism to free market capitalism. That, I believe, is a result of their ignorance and indoctrination during their school years, from kindergarten through college. For the most part, neither they nor many of their teachers and professors know what free market capitalism is.



Before the massive growth of our welfare state, private charity was the sole option for an individual or family facing insurmountable financial difficulties or other challenges. How do we know that? There is no history of Americans dying on the streets because they could not find food or basic medical assistance.



Celebrity promotion of liberal views are predictable as death and taxes. But these days the media also take these opinions seriously, trying to turn absurdities into news. The latest example was the media frenzy over a Tweet from Sen. Bernie Sanders promoting 25 year old rapper Cardi B’s economic opinions. The rapper was already a fan of Sanders, having encouraged people to “Vote for Daddy Bernie” during the last Democratic primary.

 


When President Bill Clinton signed the welfare reform act in 1996, which he negotiated with then-Speaker Newt Gingrich, the left claimed people would starve. They didn't. According to the nonpartisan Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, between 1996 and 2000, the employment rate for single mothers increased from 63 percent to 76 percent. 



On Thursday, House Democratic Party Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi characterized as "crumbs" the bonuses of $1,000 or more, pay raises of up to $3 per hour, and other benefits well over 100 companies have showered on over 2 million employees as a result of December's tax law passage. Given their track record, there's no reason to believe that the establishment press will report Pelosi's condescending remarks — or that they will remind their audience that in 2011 and 2012, the Obama administration and Democrats in Congress treated the prospect of workers losing $40 every other week in their paychecks as catastrophic.



That the problems of today's black Americans are a result of a legacy of slavery, racial discrimination and poverty has achieved an axiomatic status, thought to be self-evident and beyond question. This is what academics and the civil rights establishment have taught. But as with so much of what's claimed by leftists, there is little evidence to support it.



Univision acaba de presentar un informe tan sesgado y engañoso que, después de verlo, uno se queda con la impresión de que el presidente Donald Trump se apresuró al tachar a CNN de "Noticias Muy Falsas".



Univision has just sprung a report so awfully biased and deceptive that after watching it, one is left with the impression that President Trump may have been a bit too hasty in bestowing his coveted "Very Fake News" label upon CNN.



Liberals still sore over Donald Trump’s electoral victory are bashing the president-elect by any means, including through liberal media outlets.

In the latest volley, left-wing Slate and Vanity Fair both attacked Trump for how he’ll hurt the economy and Americans’ finances a day before Trump was scheduled to deliver an economic speech.



In a Tuesday post, Esquire blogger Pierce complained that Ronald Reagan’s anti-government rhetoric discouraged many from voting, thereby benefiting Republicans, but Donald Trump’s anti-government rhetoric encouraged many to vote, thereby benefiting Republicans. Pierce noted that Reagan, in his first inaugural address, declared “that government was not a solution to the problem, that government was the problem.” The government-bashing, Pierce charged, was meant “not just to convert voters to conservative policies that were otherwise unpopular, it also was [meant] to frustrate people into apathy and non-participation.”



Michael Lind thinks that movement conservatives are becoming a minor force in American politics, supplanted less by liberal Democrats than by what might be called Trump Republicans.

In a Wednesday article for Politico, Lind contended that growing “populist discontent” is bringing about “the gradual replacement of Buckley-Goldwater-Reagan conservatism by something more like European national populist movements, such as the National Front in France.” He also opined that conservative ideas never were all that popular, claiming that movement conservatism as well as “neoconservatism, libertarianism, the religious right…appear to have been so many barnacles hitching free rides on the whale of the Jacksonian populist electorate.”