One of the most revealing things about the leftist mindset is the usual leftist's lack of self-awareness about his own intolerance, hatefulness and inclusiveness — unless you distort all those terms to whitewash the reality. I will never forget reading (and writing about) the unfortunate experience of Professor Janice Price, an education instructor at DePauw University in Greencastle, Indiana.



A series of “miraculous” events turned Dr. Max Goodwin from an annoyed skeptic to reluctant seeker in Tuesday night’s New Amsterdam episode, 14 Years, 2 Months, 8 Days. Throughout the episode, the crusading medical director is challenged by unexplainable miracles in the hospital, all happening while an interfaith prayer group called “Prayers for Healing” holds a prayer session in the hospital lobby.



HBO’s The New Pope is still attempting to prove itself just as bad if not worse than its predecessor series The Young Pope. To do that, the show proceeds to show us how the cardinals and priests ruin lives and are generally terrible people. This time around, they push a woman into prostitution and cause a nun protest. There’s apparently nothing terrible that isn’t caused by someone religious.



The NBC sitcom Perfect Harmony can be a charming show that often shows a positive, loving image of rural Christian churchgoers. While the show also goes off-key at times in its portrayal of rural Christians, it has steered clear of pushing contemporary sexual agendas.



Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg was the latest 2020 Democrat candidate to appear on Wednesday’s The View. The hosts gave him a warm welcome, fawning over his decision to self-fund his campaign and giggling over his strange tweets during last night’s debate. In fact, nearly all the criticism Bloomberg faced from the hosts was about not being liberal enough. Yet co-host Meghan McCain did get one question in about his party’s problem with anti-Semitism.



Not wanting to be outdone by Netflix, HBO presents its own anti-religious series in The New Pope. This companion series to HBO’s previous blasphemous, slanderous, and all-around unpleasant series The Young Pope is set to make up for the nearly three-year absence of terribleness. If the "First Episode" is any indication, we’re only getting started.



Political reporter Jeremy Peters committed “strange new respect” for the religious left on the front of Saturday’s New York Times in “Why Buttigieg Is Putting Faith In the Spotlight.” Peters introduced Democratic candidate Pete Buttigieg in the midst of doing his “standard riff on the role of faith in politics” in which he “castigated Republicans for using religion as a wedge to divide Americans." Peters admitted some voters find the “Rhodes scholar, military veteran and polyglot” a bit “precocious and lacking in empathy,” then spoke to a “civil rights activist” to lament the Democratic Party ceding faith issues. And who was this “civil rights activist”? Al Sharpton.



If The Washington Post made a New Year’s resolution to cut down on the political hackery, get back to a sensible regimen of responsible sourcing, and maybe lose a few pounds of pomposity, it’s already been broken in spectacular fashion. A January 7 piece from Sarah Pulliam Bailey involves Donald Trump Jr., social media, religion, and firearms -- what could go wrong?



2020 is shaping up to be worse than 2019 if Netflix has anything to say about it. After releasing a gory fantasy just days before Christmas, Netflix kicked off the New Year with its religious drama Messiah. Let's just say the violence may have been preferable compared to this.



NBC’s flagship affiliate WNBC in New York City faced a well-deserved backlash tsunami on Thursday for an ugly piece that appeared to blame the rise of anti-Semitic attacks in the city and surrounding communities on....Jewish people themselves. Thursday morning, an authorless piece entitled “Anti-Semitism Grows in Jewish Communities in NYC Suburbs” was tweeted from the @NBCNewYork Twitter account: “With the expansion of Orthodox communities outside NYC has come civic sparring, and some fear the recent violence may be an outgrowth of that conflict.”



In October 2018, during Sabbath morning services, a white supremacist attacked the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh, murdering 11 people and wounding another six. In April 2019, in the middle of Passover, a white supremacist attacked the Chabad of Poway synagogue, murdering one person and seriously wounding another three. Both incidents started absolutely necessary conversations about the prevalence and nature of the white supremacist threat to Jews across the country.



CNN’s Jake Tapper doesn’t often shy away from calling attention to anti-Semitism, even when it comes from those on his side of the political spectrum. He called out the systemic anti-Semitism at the United Nations and broke through the media blackout when the rest refused to cover the Louis Farrakhan controversy. Monday became another one of those instances when he invited New York Times staff editor Bari Weiss and Vox senior politics reporter Jane Coaston to discuss the double standard in the attention given to anti-Semitic attacks based on the attacker.