NBC anchor Willie Geist and Meet the Press moderator Chuck Todd were miffed during Sunday Today following a recent ruling out of a federal court in Texas declaring the so-called Affordable Care Act (a.k.a ObamaCare) was unconstitutional since the “tax” penalty was a zero dollars. The liberal duo was not having any of it.



Comedian Amy Schumer has been feeling ill lately, apparently from a wicked combination of Trump Derangement Syndrome and the physical strain of being pregnant. On Tuesday, the I Feel Pretty actress posted an Instagram video of her vomiting before a big show, and despite how tasteless that was, she topped it off by sending a hateful message to “crackhead” Mississippi Republican Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith and her “Confederate ass campaign.”



Aren’t all the funny people supposed to be on the left? They’re certainly not hanging out with YouTube producers Friend Dog Studios, which has produced an anti-conservative spoof of Christ’s teachings that’s as predictable and unfunny as DNC talking points.



On Friday's Real Time show on HBO, liberal host Bill Maher and actor Jim Carrey celebrated recent Democratic candidates running on far-left platforms and identifying themselves as "socialists," leading Carrey to proclaim: "We have to say yes to socialism -- to the word and everything. We have to stop apologizing."



Several recent polls, plus the popularity of Sen. Bernie Sanders, demonstrate that young people prefer socialism to free market capitalism. That, I believe, is a result of their ignorance and indoctrination during their school years, from kindergarten through college. For the most part, neither they nor many of their teachers and professors know what free market capitalism is.



Before the massive growth of our welfare state, private charity was the sole option for an individual or family facing insurmountable financial difficulties or other challenges. How do we know that? There is no history of Americans dying on the streets because they could not find food or basic medical assistance.



When President Bill Clinton signed the welfare reform act in 1996, which he negotiated with then-Speaker Newt Gingrich, the left claimed people would starve. They didn't. According to the nonpartisan Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, between 1996 and 2000, the employment rate for single mothers increased from 63 percent to 76 percent. 



Left wing radio host Thom Hartmann, as those familiar with his rants are aware, has long railed against Republicans as hellbent on dismantling not just the welfare state provisions of Lyndon Johnson's so-called Great Society, most specifically Medicare, but also the core provisions of Roosevelt's New Deal, with Social Security topping the list.



That the problems of today's black Americans are a result of a legacy of slavery, racial discrimination and poverty has achieved an axiomatic status, thought to be self-evident and beyond question. This is what academics and the civil rights establishment have taught. But as with so much of what's claimed by leftists, there is little evidence to support it.



As Wyoming Republican Senator John Barasso appeared as a guest on CNN's Wolf show, host Wolf Blitzer pushed for the creation of a national health insurance program along the lines of the Bernie Sanders "Medicare for all" plan as he claimed that a similar system used in Canada and Europe "works well."



New York Times economics reporter Alan Rappeport furthered the myth that Trump’s health bill would be “cutting deeply into Medicaid” spending in Thursday’s Times, “Risky Mix: Cutting Taxes For Rich and Aid for Poor.” He was harsher on Twitter: “Cutting taxes for the rich and aid for the poor is proving to be a politically toxic combo.”



On Wednesday's The 11th Hour with Brian Williams, MSNBC contributor Charlie Sykes joined substitute host Nicolle Wallace -- formerly of the Bush administration -- for a "recovering Republicans" therapy session as the two discussed the Republican health care plan, and, true to form, Sykes made jabs from the left in spite of being a supposedly right-leaning analyst.