Late last week, after word came that the former ambassador to Iraq, Joe Wilson, had passed away, MSNBC repeated some of the misinformation that journalists and other liberals pushed during the George W. Bush era as anchors Joy Reid and Katy Tur lauded Wilson for disputing President Bush's claims that Saddam Hussein had tried to acquire uranium in Africa before the invasion of Iraq.



New York Times reporters David Sanger and Neil Genzlinger marked the passing of Joseph Wilson, who became a media hero in 2003, when he published an op-ed in the New York Times challenging the Bush administration’s case for war in Iraq. He became a fierce anti-war activist against President Bush and the case for war against Saddam Hussein. The Times used Wilson’s death as a chance to push an incomplete, if not false, narrative regarding the evidence of Hussein’s weapons capability in the run-up to the Iraq War, just as it did at the time.



On Monday, CBS correspondent Roxana Saberi used Iraqi President Barham Salih to shame the United States for the military response to threats posed by Iran against U.S. forces and interests in the region. Then, on Thursday’s CBS Evening News, she appeared to up the ante by passing along a threat of violence against the U.S. made by an Iraqi politician who was part of an Iranian-backed “militia”.



An Atlantic article by Staff Writer Emma Green titled, “The Impossible Future of Christians in the Middle East,” is something of a small miracle. Where most liberal outlets are reluctant to mention, let alone explore, the plight of Christians in Muslim-majority nations, Green lays out what’s at stake: “The precarious state of Christianity in Iraq is tragic on its own terms. The world may soon witness the permanent displacement of an ancient religion, and an ancient people.”



Despite the fact a rocket landed in the Baghdad green zone close to the U.S. Embassy over the weekend, the CBS Evening News was more interested in wagging its finger at the U.S.’s response to intelligence reports suggesting possible Iranian backed attacks were coming. To back up their position, CBS relied on Iraqi President Barham Salih.



Being a lefty journalist means never having to say you’re sorry. Good thing, too. You’d be so busy wiping egg from your face you’d barely have time to scream about climate change causing pregnant hens to fly. Take media-types’ early, swooning support for Al Jazeera’s attempts to enter the U.S. market. Sure, character witnesses Nicholas Kristof, Brian Stelter and the Boston Globe said, The Beheading Channel is dishonest, anti-Israel and anti-American, but it’s a fresh, intriguing anti-Israel and American bias.



Despite warnings from the Trump administration about an imminent attack by Iran or its proxies against American allies and forces, and the attack against oil tankers that followed, the liberal media has been claiming the threat from Iran was being overblown by an administration itching for a war. But, during an interview with ABC’s chief global affairs correspondent Martha Raddatz for This Week, former Army General David Petraeus pushed back and dismantled their fear mongering.



The USS Abraham Lincoln was speeding to the Persian Gulf, U.S. military bases in the Middle East were on high alert, then on Wednesday nonemergency staff for the U.S. Embassy in Iraq were ordered to leave because the U.S. had intelligence of an “imminent” Iranian-backed attack. But the liberal media, which often carries water for the regime, was skeptical. ABC News suggested it was “faulty” intel akin to the Iraq War. NBC News claimed it’s a “real test” of President Trump’s credibility.



On her MSNBC show, Joy Reid claims that during the Bush era, "we were . . . starving people in Guantanamo." MSNBC analyst Malcolm Nance then accuses President Trump of having pardoned a former Army officer, convicted of killing a suspected al Qaeda terrorist, for purposes of "greenlighting actual offenses by people who support their side."



WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has been arrested after being kicked out of the Ecuadorian Embassy in London...finally. For media who have spent the fast few years focused on the narrative, Assange was seen as the face that symbolized the threat posed to the United States by Russia, second only to Vladimir Putin. However, it wasn't always that way.



The Oscars are this weekend and while we’re not insisting that you care to tune in — we’d refrain too if we could — maybe it’d be somewhat important to spare you the mystery and inform you that this year’s awards is serving up another seven-layer slice of progressive obsession.



The New York Times reacted with typical petulance to Donald and Melania Trump’s first visit to the troops in Iraq, bashing not only Trump himself (typical) but the U.S. troops in Iraq for bringing Trump their personal MAGA hats to sign, while pondering if the troops would be disciplined. The headline to Annie Karni’s Friday edition report led with the negative: “President Crossed Political Line in Visit to Soldiers Abroad, Critics Say.” The online headline was blunt: “Trump Iraq Visit Is Called a Political Rally.”