It’s no secret that Hollywood takes joy in bashing Christianity. Syfy’s new show Blood Drive, which takes place in a dystopian world destroyed by fracking, just joined the slew of liberal TV shows with anti-Christian plotlines. Wednesday’s episode “Scar Tissue,” had lead characters Arthur (Alan Ritchson) and Grace (Christina Ochoa) held captive in a town where everyone is drugged into believing they live in a Utopia. Grace discovers that the town supposedly filled with beautiful and happy individuals is actually a wasteland full of disfigured, sore-covered people due to the trickery of the Reverend. When she tries to reveal the truth to Arthur, the Reverend stops her, saying, “Beloved, ‘charm is deceitful. And beauty is vanity. But the woman who fears the Lord, she shall be praised.’ Proverbs 30:31.


Generally, when celebrity ambulance chaser Gloria Allred calls a press conference, you can be sure some perversion of justice is about to be attempted. But what if she’s attempting to bring a pervert to justice?


The writers of Hulu’s Difficult People feel no shame in trumpeting their complete disdain for the President and his supporters. Tuesday’s episode, “Rabbitversary” had main characters Julie (Julie Klausner) and (Billy Eichner) call “f*cking” Trump supporters “racist” “pieces of sh*t” without any prompting. Bitter over their lack of decent jobs, Julie and Billy go from complaining about their lives to complaining about Trump voters. After performing a skit for a New York City tour bus, they act as if all the tourists are “f*cking Trump voters” and swear at them. Showing how liberals like to caricaturize all Trump supporters, the two call them “homeschoolers” and even make a jab at Sarah Palin.


El canal Fusion ha atravesado muchas versiones y cambios de formato a lo largo de su breve existencia como afiliada angloparlante de la cadena Univision. No obstante, la cadena ha sido consistente en un aspecto: su defensa de políticas y causas de extrema izquierda. Su reciente oda a Planned Parenthood no es sino el ejemplo más reciente.


When Islamic extremists attack a military awards ceremony on a primetime television show, you can bet that within a few episodes it will be made clear that the suicide-vested attackers shouting “Allahu Akbar” will be absolved. The terrorism was just an act, theater for the witnesses and victims meant to distract the populace from the real attackers. In Shooter, the real perpetrator is our very own government—and possibly the United Nations.


Earlier this year, this space spotlighted the embarrassing predicament that ABC and its cable operations (including Disney Channel and ESPN) have gotten The Walt Disney Company in: “Most television executives would have stopped the corruption going on at both networks a long time ago, but [Ben] Sherwood might be looking for a way to profit from the liberal bleed infecting both broadcasters.”


The world of television and how Hollywood delivers it keeps changing. Streaming services like Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon have become prestige brands whose original programming draws a pile of Emmy nominations. But as much as technology changes, some things remain the same. The entertainment factories keep ripping on Republican politicians in the crudest terms.


Talking to NBC News Medical Correspondent Dr. John Torres on Friday about the Trump administration promising aggressive action on the nationwide opioid crisis, MSNBC anchor Craig Melvin worried that the focus on the deadly drug abuse epidemic was based on race.


Conservatives who’ve rallied behind former Google engineer James Damore traditionally have undermined workers like him, contended The New Republic’s Josephine Livingstone on Wednesday. Livingstone has no use for Damore’s now-famous, if little-read, memo, which allegedly “contained a bunch of ‘red-pill’ nonsense about biological differences between men and women,” but she also claimed that the right typically objects to certain protections for fired employees like Damore.


Monday evening, National Public Radio published a tweet about the Google-free speech controversy that raised eyebrows and brought on torrents of ridicule, namely that "some women at the company skipped work today, upset by the leaked memo" written by now-fired software engineer James Damore. It turns out that the basis for the claim is so extraordinarily thin that it shouldn't have been reported.


In the second to last episode of NBC’s The Carmichael Show, “Three Year Anniversary,” a threesome supposedly makes Jerrod Carmichael a better man. On Wednesday night’s episode, Jerrod and his fiancée Maxine (Amber Stevens West) celebrate their three-year anniversary by having a threesome with a random woman they meet at a restaurant. The next morning, basking in their post-threesome glow, the couple discuss how they can “accomplish anything together now.


FX’s Snowfall continues its season-long plot about the cocaine epidemic of the 1980s. You need a reminder that the show is about the '80s? There’s no better one than an image of President Ronald Reagan inserted into a scene. But Snowfall goes one step further with another '80s pastime: hating Ronald Reagan.