Despite calling themselves feminists, liberals constantly slam conservative women without remorse. On Wednesday’s episode of Comedy Central’s anti-business show, Corporate, “The Long Meeting,” Hampton Deville Board of Directors member Bill Hathaway (Fred Willard) announces, “So that concludes the story of how I got laid by Margaret Thatcher. Great at sex but...terrible at politics.


Phew! We can relax, America. Everything’s going to be OK. Jennifer Lawrence is taking a year off from acting to save us from ourselves.


In addition to being anti-business, Comedy Central’s new show Corporate is also anti-religion. On Wednesday’s episode, Casual Friday, Hampton Deville’s CEO announces, “We all know there's no God, but there is a ton of money to be made in His name,” in anticipation of meeting with power/money-hungry Glorious Salvation Ministries representative Alyssa Armstrong. CEO Christian Deville meets with the cross-bearing representative of the largest group of mega-churches in the country to discuss how Hampton Deville will furnish them with flat screens, massage chairs, and snacks, in return for the corporation’s logo being broadcasted all over the churches. Or as Alyssa puts it, “Every time my congregants go to pray, they'll be thinking of the Father, Son, Holy Spirit, and Hampton f*cking Deville."


MRCTV's Brittany M. Hughes reported Monday that Kehinde Wiley, Barack Obama's official portrait artist, previously created two paintings of black women holding white women's severed heads, making him the art world's equivalent of Donald Trump severed-head comedienne Kathy Griffin. Additionally, Wiley, described in New York Magazine as "possibly the wealthiest painter of his generation," outsources much of "his" painting to China to "cut costs." Establishment press coverage has virtually ignored these components of Wiley's background, but their descriptions of Obama's involvement in selecting him reveal his almost certain awareness of the artist's full portfolio.


Today's story out of Miami occupies the sweet spot in the Venn diagram comprised of Univision's anti-Catholicism and its strident LGBTQ advocacy, far from the mainstream of the network's viewership. The network pulled off a neat trick- casting aspersions on longstanding religious freedom protections while slyly advocating for the proposed law that would destroy them.


As the Winter Olympics kicked off in Pyeongchang, South Korea, ABC’s Good Morning America on Friday featured a report from Amy Robach that highlighted how Vice President Mike Pence, leading the U.S. delegation to the games, was “facing criticism today from openly gay freestyle skier Gus Kenworthy.”


Looks like NBC’s Law & Order: SVU still hasn’t learned a bit from last week’s disaster. Somehow, they’ve managed to jump from raping a conservative pundit straight into euthanizing a ten-month-old baby. Safe to say, decency standards have left the room ages ago.


At the top of Thursday’s NBC Today, co-host Hoda Kotb sounded the alarm about a new film in the works: “Is Mel Gibson planning a sequel to his most controversial and successful movie ever?” Later in the show, fellow co-host Savannah Guthrie gave more details as she similarly warned: “What we’re learning about Mel Gibson’s plan for a sequel to his most controversial movie ever, The Passion of the Christ.”


Sticking with the overdone evil corporation theme, Comedy Central’s new anti-capitalist show, Corporate, takes on fracking in its January 31 episode, “Trademarq.” The wicked corporation Hampton Deville suffers from aggressive protests and vandalism due to its use of super fracking. Additionally, one of the main characters imagines himself punching God. On his way to work, the Hampton Deville CEO is greeted by sign-wielding protesters chanting and even throwing things at him. He discovers that business-hating street artist Trademarq has painted a picture on the doors of the building depicting the CEO shooting the earth with a gun


The Intercept's Peter Maass hyped on Saturday that the war film 12 Strong is just latest example of "problematic" Hollywood productions that "model a cliched form of masculinity that veers from simplistic to monstrous." Maass, a former journalist for the New York Times, lobbied the movie industry to "turn away from war movies that...perpetuate a model of masculinity that does violence to us all." He later asserted that many of the successful military-centric films were "masculine nonsense."


CW’s Supergirl has managed to avoid anything too obnoxious since last year’s crossover, but in this episode the show returns to its regular practice of using thinly veiled real world references to preach liberal bunk.


The Grammys are over (and if you watched it, sorry: those IQ points are gone forever.) The Oscars are a little over a month away. That means the we’ve reached peak entertainment awards season, with all the glitz, style and self-congratulation kicking into overdrive.