Appearing on MSNBC Live With Stephanie Ruhle Thursday morning, faux conservative New York Times Columnist Bret Stephens ranted that House Speaker Paul Ryan’s refusal to resign in protest after Donald Trump’s election in 2016 “is going to be a stain on his political reputation forever.”



MSNBC’s Lawrence O’Donnell has a reputation as a liberal bomb thrower (and hater of hammering). And during Wednesday’s edition of The Last Word, he had his claws out for House Speaker Paul Ryan who earlier that day announced he was retiring. According to the MSNBC host, Ryan was a worse speaker than pedophile Dennis Hastert and the pre-Civil War speakers who owned slaves; all because “they were all more effective in their job as speaker than Paul Ryan,” who wouldn’t oppose Trump.



Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan (WI) left much of Washington, D.C. stunned Wednesday when he announced his retirement from Congress after over 19 years in office. But while ABC’s World News Tonight and CBS Evening News reported on his retirement and touched on GOP struggles in the midterms, NBC Nightly News almost celebrated it. Correspondent Kasie Hunt called it a victory for Democrats by declaring “Ryan couldn't escape the building blue wave.”



Feeding into the left’s dream of impeaching President Trump, CNN’s infamously incomparable White House correspondent Jim Acosta raised during Wednesday’s White House briefing the prospect of the President being impeached by the House if Democrats take control starting in January 2019.



Saturday was, as Katie Yoder at NewsBusters noted Tuesday afternoon, a "sad day." That's when the Women's March sprang to the defense of Backpage.com, tweeting that its Friday seizure by the Justice Department "is an absolute crisis for sex workers." In that same tweet, the group declared that "Sex workers rights are women’s rights." Backpage and seven associated individuals were indicted Monday on charges relating to facilitating prostitution — including child prostitution conducted by human sex traffickers. Thus far, the establishment press has been almost unanimously running cover for the Women's March by ignoring its disgraceful position.



In the latest example of a zany rant from a fake conservative, Washington Post columnist and MSNBC political analyst Jennifer Rubin reacted to the Michael Cohen raid on Tuesday’s All In by declaring that the Trump-Russia probe is worse than Watergate and that Democrats must win in November to defeat Republicans who have violated their oaths of office.



Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg grappled with questions of all stripes at Tuesday’s Senate hearing on the social media platform and the 2016 election, but it was Nebraska Republican Senator Ben Sasse’s questions about hate speech that should alarm free speech advocates. Along with inquiries from Texas Republican Ted Cruz, Sasse stood out.



Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg ran smack into questions about the site’s neutrality during his testimony in front of members of the U.S. Senate on Tuesday. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) questioned Zuckerberg, asking if the site is a neutral platform for people to express different political opinions. Zuckerberg said he is “very committed to making sure that Facebook is a platform for all ideas.”



The Boston Globe's Ty Burr reviewed Chappaquiddick Tuesday, admonishing readers that the movie "might even be accurate." Burr claims that "I'll never know" what really happened the night Ted Kennedy drove off Chappaquiddick Island's Dike Road bridge and left Mary Jo Kopechne to die in his submerged car, "and neither will you." Besides, he insists, though Ted was "flawed but human," he had "endless accomplishments in the Senate."



To put it simply, cable news thrives off of speculation and little discussion of the actual news. The Tuesday edition of MSNBC’s Hardball opened with a segment perfectly encapsulating this reality with the panel gaming out how a Trump impeachment could go down, what charges he’d face, and whether he’ll be found to have violated the Logan Act in the Russia probe.



KEY LARGO, Florida — At dinner with friends, I was asked what is wrong with Washington. The question presumes a standard by which "wrong" can be defined. I am frequently asked this question by people who do not live in "the swamp." They don't behave like Washington politicians. If a disagreement arises in their personal or professional life, they discuss it and usually compromise and work things out. Only in Washington, they note, does this rarely happen, and when it does it makes headlines.



A Democratic House member has, by her own admission, failed to protect female staff members who said they were harassed and treated violently by her former chief of staff. Rep. Elizabeth Esty has also admitted that she gave the chief of staff a $5,000 payoff when he left, along with a favorable job recommendation. In her Friday evening report on the situation, the Associated Press's Susan Haigh played defense — for Esty, describing her as "an outspoken advocate for the #MeToo movement" who is now in an "awkward position." Haigh also tried to help her salvage her political career by describing her outreach to groups involved with "issues affecting women" when she knew the news was about to go public.