Offering quite the overreaction to the controversial White House decision to ban CNN White House reporter Kaitlan Collins, MSNBC’s Hardball host Chris Matthews loosely tied President Trump to communist regimes of yesteryear when “people were only allowed to hear news from the government, that you got arrested or worse if you were caught even listening to news from anywhere else.”



After AC360 host Anderson Cooper deemed Monday's Trump-Putin press conference “one of the most disgraceful performances by an American president,” the craziness continued with Cooper stating that “today is just an incredibly depressing moment in our time in our history as an American” while other panelists opined that it’s been a “surreal” day known as “the surrender summit.” 



New York Times reporter Sarah Lyall offered a disturbing look at the World Cup host city of Volgograd, Russia, where some  actually have found World War II-related memories of one of the world’s cruelest dictators, Joseph Stalin. But the most important part of a story on Stalin is nearly absent: Why he is such a controversial figure in the first place. Whitewashing the crimes of Soviet Communism is a shameful habit at the Times, whose notorious "Red Century" series did the same to mark the 100th anniversary of the Russian Revolution.



Yet another long New York Times article on the humanitarian crisis in Venezuela spared no space for the “S-word,” -- socialism -- that is the root cause of the country’s woes. William Neuman and Clifford Krauss devoted 1,700 words on the front of Friday’s edition to one facet of the country’s woes: "Job at Oil Giant Is No Longer Path to the Venezuelan Dream.” The absence of the actual cause of Venezuela’s human tragedy – authoritarian socialism – is par for the course for the paper, as demonstrated on Newsbusters again and again.



Venezuela's descent under Bolivarian socialist President and de facto dictator Nicolas Maduro has achieved yet another grim milestone. This time it's the return of polio, on top of other previously eradicated diseases including diphtheria, tuberculosis, measles, and malaria. The return of polio has caught the attention of some in the international press in the past few days, but only one of over a dozen related English stories found in early Monday afternoon Eastern Time Google News searches identified the nation or its leader as socialist. Also as of Monday afternoon, there was no coverage at major U.S. news outlets.



WASHINGTON — I ce did a weekly column for the Washington Post. It appeared on Mondays and was picked up in San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York, Boston, possibly Chicago and I believe Bull Snort, Georgia. It ran in a lot of newspapers, but that was many years ago. Things were different in America. Liberals were different then. For one thing, liberals were liberal. Now, of course, they are progressives, and feminists, and, forget not, some are socialists. Who knows — maybe some are Marxist-Leninist socialists.



Wednesday, CNN presented yet another story about Venezuela's implosion which did a fine job of portraying that country's human misery, this time in the oil industry. Unfortunately, it was yet another example of a story failing to mention its socialist form of government or even its leader, President Nicolas Maduro. Though such omissions have long been routine in establishment press reports, reporter Stefano Pozzebon's were particularly galling, given that the governments of Maduro and especially Hugo Chavez, his Bolivarian socialist predecessor, are entirely responsible for Venezuela's oil collapse.



Protests by workers and activists and, in some cases, violence by anarchists marked the far-left holiday May Day this year.

But most American news consumers would not have known that some London demonstrators carried communist flags and banners of brutal Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin. They weren’t told that communists marched in Athens, Greece, or that anti-capitalist anarchists destroyed windows and threw Molotov cocktails in Paris.



The New York Times just can't get enough of promoting, defending, and excusing Marxism and communism. At the paper's online blog called "The Stone" on Monday, Jason Barker, an associate professor of philosophy, celebrated the upcoming 200th anniversary of Karl Marx's birth by telling the Communist Manifesto's author: "You Were Right!



As Venezuela's socialism-driven disaster deepens, the press's unwillingness to recognize its cause has gone from being "merely" negligent and outrageous to absolutely disgusting. This obvious failure, which is almost certainly conscious and deliberate, is present even when a journalist's work portraying the human element of the crisis is otherwise compelling. Such is the case with Ernesto Londoño's Saturday report at the New York Times about how refugees fleeing that country are overwhelming the ability of towns in northern Brazil to handle them.



The Associated Press and many of the AP's colleagues in the establishment press have had a nearly 60-year romance with Cuba's brutal communist regime. They have frequently regaled readers with the island nation's "free healthcare" and "free education," as if that makes up for the fact that the typical Cuban subsists on far less than the $2 a day the international community considers extreme poverty. Today, the AP, in a tweet and at least two headlines, pretended that it was a free election that elevated Miguel Diaz-Canel to Cuba's presidency.



Tuesday, the Washington Post, whose motto since February 2017 has been "Democracy Dies in Darkness," gave precious access to a supporter of Xi Jinping's consolidation of power in mainland China. "Shanghai venture capitalist" Eric X. Li also taunted the West, claiming that "liberal democracy in its current state seems incapable of producing a leader half as good."