The New York Times doesn’t just inject anti-capitalist and anti-conservative positions into its “news” coverage, but uses every section to make its arguments, concealed under the rubrics of Arts or Style. The Times is gleeful over the inevitable demise of capitalism, as demonstrated by an enraptured take by culture reporter Jennifer Schuessler of a hard-left satirical exhibit, “Museum of Capitalism."



Avengers: Endgame actor Mark Ruffalo is a major Bernie Bro. When he’s not starring in his fourth Marvel comic adaptation of the year, you can find the Hollywood leftie Hulking out over the socialist presidential candidate on Twitter and going green (in more ways than one) over the Vermont senator’s climate change initiatives.

 


A recent survey conducted by the Victims of Communism and polled by YouGov, a research and data firm, found that 70% of millennials are likely to vote socialist and that one in three millennials saw communism as “favorable.” Let's examine this tragic vision in light of the Fraser Institute's recently released annual study “Economic Freedom of the World,” prepared by Professors James Gwartney, Florida State University; Robert A. Lawson and Ryan Murphy of Southern Methodist University; and Joshua Hall, West Virginia University, in cooperation with the Economic Freedom Network.



While marking the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, on Friday’s NBC Today show, former Nightly News anchor Tom Brokaw sat down for an fawning interview with former East German Olympic skater Katarina Witt, whom he labeled “the beautiful face of socialism.” Rather than celebrate the collapse of authoritarian Communism in Europe, Brokaw sympathized with Witt over how “hard” it must have been on her athletic career.



Argentine-born Communist revolutionary and guerilla leader Che Guevara murdered and imprisoned thousands, supervised firing squads during revolutionary tribunals, founded forced labor camps, and dissolved free press in Cuba. Bizarrely, none of that made it into Tony Perrottet’s shallow, symbolic travelogue of Revolutionary Cuba that appears in the Smithsonian, the official journal of the federal-funded Smithsonian Institution. The writer palled around with Che’s son, bopping around the island to various shrines to the mass killer (and lousy father to boot).



Quentin Tarantino is having a bad week. It remains to be seen if his week is as bad as Lebron James’s was last week, but the cause is the same: the bullying communist Chinese government. Chinese censors have blocked Tarantino’s latest film from premiering in their country. Rumor has it that China film regulators did not take kindly to the director’s cartoonish depiction of martial artist Bruce Lee and are demanding that the film be recut or not be shown at all.



The recent Chinese/NBA debacle is a time of reckoning for folks who take athlete activism seriously. In the past, superstar Golden State Warrior captain Stephen Curry has been quite vocal about status quo lefty politics and his hatred for Donald Trump, but like his coward coach, Steve Kerr, the outspoken can’t star seem to find an answer when asked about actual oppression from the NBA’s business partner, the communist Chinese government.



Unlike some other businesses and corporations, South Park and Comedy Central aren't afraid of offending Communist China. In fact, they doubled down in Wednesday night's episode "SHOTS!!!" by having a major character shout, "[Bleep] the Chinese government!"



It seems traditional American, pro-democratic values may be less important to the NBA than its Chinese revenue. Distancing itself from Houston Rockets General Manager Daryl Morey over his support for Hong Kong in its battle against the authoritarian Chinese state was apparently the league’s latest smart money move.



The South Park episode "Band in China" that aired Wednesday night exposed the brutalities and human rights abuses of the Communist government and we're feeling pretty good about it. The episode slammed the entertainment industry for allowing Communist China to censor content produced in the United States.



Mixed-ish premiered on ABC Tuesday and it is about the childhood of Rainbow "Bow" Johnson, the mother in the hit television show Black-ish played by Tracee Ellis Ross. In what has become typical from ABC, the show features themes such as communistic sympathy, anti-conservative and anti-capitalism bias.



It’s climate change hysteria week and all the best in melodramatic, manipulative, and grotesque activism has been put on display for Mother Earth. Most notably,16-year-old climate activist Greta Thunberg’s dramatic meltdown at the U.N. went over about as smoothly as Harrison Ford landing a Cessna.