Gun control activist and media mogul Michael Bloomberg isn’t just pushing gun control through his activist group — he also has a giant media company to promote those views. Bloomberg media is filled with anti-gun content.


Appearing on MSNBC in the 9:00 a.m. ET hour on Tuesday, with fellow anti-gun activist Stephanie Ruhle, New York Times finance editor Andrew Ross Sorkin touted his latest column demanding that banks and credit card companies ban their customers from making gun purchases with credit cards.


On Monday, shortly after President Trump asked two employees at a suburban Cincinnati manufacturer to describe their plans for the $1,000 bonuses they had received, MSNBC's Katy Tur ridiculed them on Twitter. Tur considered $1,000 a pittance, and contended that the bonus money wouldn't genuinely help the employees involved achieve their stated goals. On Wednesday, Tur responded poorly to the outrage over her condescension by trying to change the subject.


At the Cincinnati Enquirer on Monday, reporter Jessie Balmert "fact-checked" President Donald Trump's afternoon speech at a suburban manufacturer. Balmert is the Enquirer reporter who in mid-2016 told readers that there were 220,000 U.S. murders in 2015 (actual number: 15,192). As would be expected, her Monday "fact check" was riddled with obvious errors and distortions.


Those who linger at the The New Yorker magazine's website eventually see a splash advertising its dedication to "fighting fake stories with real ones." Staff writer John Cassidy's ridiculous assertion that "George Soros Upstaged Donald Trump at Davos" shows that this is clearly false advertising.


On January 11, Nancy Pelosi slammed as "crumbs" the wage increases and bonuses well over 100 companies had announced at that point after the new tax law's passage in December. Thursday, she went to the same well more stridently. The establishment press, including the Associated Press, still won't report Pelosi's and others' similar comments, because they know how toxic they are.


Friday, Fox Business's Maria Bartiromo interviewed Philip Jennings, General Secretary of the UNI Global Union, as he took a break from supposedly helping the downtrodden by attending the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Jennings whined that unions can't organize in America because of government and employer obstruction, and brought the host to a boil when he falsely claimed that 62 percent of the benefits of December's tax-cut legislation go to the top 1 percent.


On Wednesday, Starbucks added itself to the long list of companies announcing moves benefiting employees while crediting the tax law passed in December. The company's strong leftist pedigree is making things awkward for the left-leaning press, which has, among other things, conveniently forgotten that just three months ago, Howard Schultz, the company's executive chairman and former CEO, slammed the Republicans' tax-cut plan as "fool's gold," claiming that corporate America "does not need" a sharp cut in its top tax rate.


The liberal media are so reluctant to give President Trump credit for anything positive his legislation achieves, that they will even keep silent when that legislation directly benefits them.


On Tuesday, Verizon announced that it would grant 153,000 of its 155,000 employees a bonus in the form of 50 shares of restricted stock (approximate value: $2,650), while Disney announced $1,000 bonuses for 125,000 of its cast members. Verizon also announced a significant increase in donations ($200-$300 million over the next two years) to its STEM education philanthropic effort, while Disney is "making a $50 million initial investment" (plus $25 million per year in future years) to help 88,000 employees cover college tuition costs. CNN Money's coverage of these developments still refused to fully acknowledge how unprecedentedly good the past five weeks' tax cut-driven news has been.


CNN political analyst, Playboy correspondent, and Sentinel Newspapers editor Brian Karem made a fool of himself during Tuesday’s White House briefing, suggesting to Gary Cohn that it’s “unfair” to give President Trump “credit” for the bounty of businesses announcing employee bonuses and new investments post-tax reform.


The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed above 26,000 for the first time on Wednesday. When it first jumped the 26,000 hurdle during Tuesday's trading, only to fall back at the close, CNN's Christine Romans somewhat surprisingly noted it. But as she did, she positively and erroneously spun the market's awful pre-presidential election history in a way that even some conservatives have ignorantly come to accept.