Amazon CEO and founder Jeff Bezos is now the world’s wealthiest man, and the liberal media love denouncing him for it.

They’ve also started telling him what to do with his money and power now that he’s begun giving some of it away. Bezos is estimated to be worth $162 billion, and he and his wife announced on Sept. 13, they would give $2 billion to address homelessness and preschool education.



Democratic socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders has at least one media champion for his Stop BEZOS Act. The bill, which is obviously targeting CEO Jeff Bezos of Amazon, would levy a 100 percent tax on companies in the amount their employees receive in federal benefits.



Authoritarian governments are known for having a boot on the neck of freedom. CNBC’s on air editor Rick Santelli said the Obama administration had a "boot on business." Santelli was rumbling with former Obama official and Brookings Institution economist Aaron Klein over taxes, spending and whether the Obama administration enacted “pro-growth” economic reforms.



During a softball interview with Democratic Senator and potential 2020 presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren on Tuesday, MSNBC anchor Andrea Mitchell avoided asking a single question about the left-wing lawmaker’s radical proposal to impose stringent government regulations on any business with over one billion dollars in revenue. 



A businessman connected to Nathan’s Famous hot dogs is a close friend of President Donald Trump. His decision to host a political fundraiser for Trump on Aug. 17, infuriated the left, who responded with calls to boycott.



Far-left Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren has a new plan to regulate the largest businesses and some in the media helped promote it. She published a Wall Street Journal op-ed about her new legislation, the “Accountable Capitalism Act,” on Aug. 14. The very next day, Mad Money host Jim Cramer interviewed Warren about her “Novel way to reward the stakeholders of the enterprise.” He also called the op-ed “incredibly provocative.”



During a report for NBC’s Today show on Wednesday, Senior Investigative and Legal Correspondent Cynthia McFadden seized on Democrats accusing President Trump of violating the Constitution, recycling year-old claims about the Trump International Hotel in Washington D.C. flouting a ban on an elected officials receiving foreign payments. 



The government's Friday June jobs report showed that the economy gained 213,000 seasonally adjusted payroll jobs, while the nation's unemployment rate increased from 3.8 percent to 4.0 percent, primarily because 601,000 more Americans were in the labor force. Despite the increase in overall joblessness, the rate among Hispanics fell to 4.6 percent, its lowest level in the over 45 years of that statistic's history. Unlike in recent months, during which print and online establishment press outlets have mostly recognized record lows seen in black/African-American unemployment, the press has been very quiet about June's record Hispanic low. This has been particularly true at most of its perceived gatekeepers.



The New York Times has been obsessed with the idea that Russian "meddling" somehow affected 2016's presidential election results and prevented a Hillary Clinton presidency. The Times has also served as a conduit for several leaks by opponents of President Donald Trump and others who are sympathetic with (or even part of) Special Counsel Robert Mueller's Trump-Russia investigation. So it's more than a little ironic that Times reporter Raymond Zhong, in a Friday report (for Saturday's print edition) covering China's imposition of tariffs on certain U.S. imports, noted with how its tariffs "were chosen to hit President Trump’s supporters" without characterizing them as a clear attempt at election meddling — one with far more potential impact than clumsy attempts at social media manipulation allegedly orchestrated by Russia.



The climate alarmists writers at InsideClimateNews (ICN) seemed thrilled that Rhode Island became the first state to sue oil companies over climate change.

Rhode Island’s State Attorney General Peter F. Kilmartin filed suit against 14 oil and gas companies and affiliates on July 2, 2018, claiming “Big oil knew for decades that greenhouse gas pollution from their operations and their products were having a significant and detrimental impact on the earth’s climate.”



On Saturday afternoon, Ken Thomas and Jon Gambrell at the Associated Press demonstrated the wire service's chronic resistance to recognizing genuinely good news during the Trump era. The pair pretended in their story about Donald Trump's Saturday conversation with Saudi King Salman that the President could only "claim" that Saudi Arabia has agreed to significantly boost its oil production in response to a tightening in worldwide supplies — even though as soon as Trump tweeted about it, the Saudi news agency confirmed its substance.



Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson announced Tuesday that the nation's number 3 fast-food outlet (by number of locations) is closing 150 U.S. stores. It's not difficult to read Johnson's comments as indicating that the shuttered stores will primarily be in "blue" or liberal sections of the U.S. At the same time, he has specifically targeted "middle America and the South" for expansion. The business press isn't even trying to make the obvious connection between Johnson's announcement and the respective presence or absence of high minimum-wage laws and excessive regulation.