New York Times London-based reporter Ceylan Yeginsu reported on the abortion debate in Belfast under a flawlessly biased headline: “Can Northern Ireland Cling To Its Draconian Abortion Laws?” The online headline was bad in a different way: "Climate of Fear: When Part of a Country Bans Abortion.” (“Bans abortion” is an odd way to describe a law that has been in place in Northern Ireland since 1861.)



As BBC's Years and Years, which has aired in the United States on HBO, came to a close with Episode 6 airing July 29, the writers couldn't help but throw in some more comparisons between evil Prime Minister Vivienne Rook (Emma Thompson) and President Donald Trump.



On Thursday, CNN International and PBS aired a segment in which Christiane Amanpour and her guests fear mongered about the collapse of the United Kingdom at the hands of Prime Minister Boris Johnson as well as the end of “a really great renaissance” in Britain.



There was no honeymoon for Boris Johnson, the new Conservative Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, in the New York Times. The same old hostility greeted him, and his push to make good on the 2016 referendum to leave the European Union, known as Brexit: "After a lifetime of joking and blustering and maneuvering his way into jobs and then sabotaging himself with poor preparation and deceitful behavior, Mr. Johnson, 55, seems determined to prove he can put aside his court-jesterish ways and rise to the occasion."



All three networks on Tuesday night offered up mocking, derisive reports on Brexit-supporting Boris Johnson winning his party's support and becoming the new British Prime Minister. ABC, CBS and NBC also highlighted comparisons of the conservative leader to Donald Trump. On World News Tonight, Ian Pannell derided, “To his opponents, he's an ambitious philanderer, unfaithful in marriage, accused of racism and of having no fixed principles. Many have compared him to Donald Trump.” 



The New York Times can’t stop whining about how the UK Conservative Party determines its membership. It’s an indirect way to bash Brexit, and Conservative front-runner for the Prime Minister slot Boris Johnson, under the guise of concern for democracy, which is why this obscure issue has become a Times obsession. The latest example appeared in the Sunday edition, “1% of Voters Will Pick Britain’s Prime Minister. The Rest Are Fuming.” The text box: “Brexit gridlock has many questioning a political system.” Just in time to oppose Brexit. How convenient!



Conservative Party members in the United Kingdom will be choosing their next party leader who will become Prime Minister. And Washington Post reporters William Booth and Karla Adam have sniffed their disapproval of the cut of their jibs starting with the fact that they don't think these voters are representative of the general population of Britain despite the fact that the vote is supposed to be composed entirely of Conservative Party members.



On BBC’s Episode 4 of Years and Years, which aired July 15 in the United States on HBO, it’s now 2027. The world continues to be in chaos, with financial and governing problems plaguing European nations. The United States is hit, too, as Roe v. Wade has finally been overturned, all these years later.



Overnight, the rogue Iranian regime had their Revolutionary Guard spark another international incident by assailing a British oil tanker. It was the latest in a series of attacks by Iran, which included the bombing of several other oil tankers, but ABC News didn’t think it was important enough to tell their millions of viewers about during their flagship morning and evening newscasts on Thursday.



The New York Times does not like British Conservative politician Boris Johnson, and certainly not his Brexit cause, and makes little attempt to hide it, even in its news coverage (and forget about the opinion section). Reporter Stephen Castle’s coverage of the debate between conservatives Johnson and Jeremy Hunt over who would become the Conservative Party’s new leader (and in effect the next Prime Minister of Great Britain) included this charming line on Brexit: "That cause is embraced with virtually cultlike certitude by almost all Conservative members now...."



LONDON — There is the musty smell of a police state here in old London, or should I say an inchoate police state? The present mayor, Sadiq Khan, is of the left, and he shares the left's lust for power. Everything he does indicates his hankering for power. To me, a foreigner in these parts, I sense this lust in his treatment of the automobile. The mayor envisages London as a city abundant with bicycle riders and pedestrians. In his London of the future, the only automobiles will be the patrol cars of the police.



In whining about President Trump’s response to the Ambassador’s comments, CBS Evening News mourned for Darroch’s resignation and defended his comments. “Sir Kim Darroch's resignation came after days of unrelenting criticism by President Trump, who said he would no longer work with the British ambassador,” bemoaned senior foreign affairs correspondent and Face the Nation moderator Margaret Brennan.