ANGLESEY, Wales -- The UK Daily Mail has again published a story about a subject that has become a recurring theme this time of year. No, not Christmas, but rather drunkenness, though the holiday is used as its primary excuse. Pictures accompanying the story show young people collapsing in gutters and vomiting on the sidewalks. It is not a pretty sight.

The every-more radical Newsweek’s blame-Trump-for-everything philosophy reached a nadir Monday afternoon, with the headline “Because of Trump, People Are Burning Israeli Flags and Attacking Jews.” Sadly, Jews have been attacked in Europe long before Donald Trump arrived on the political scene. A more accurate headline would read: “Because They Hate Jews, Radical Muslims Are Burning Israeli Flags and Attacking Jews.”

Morning Joe just cannot get over Trump’s retweets of three anti-Muslim videos last week. Last Friday, with no evidence, the liberal morning show’s panelists promoted the idea that Trump’s retweets were part of a top secret, sinister plot to incite potentially murderous violence against Muslims in America. This Monday, co-host Joe Scarborough tried a new angle, repeatedly insisting that Britain First, the group whose leader Trump retweeted, is a terrorist organization that “assassinates members of parliament” in the United Kingdom. Simply put, Scarborough’s claim is completely false.

The New York Times is still finding ways to stay on the snobbish losing side against the popular movement for national sovereignty known as Brexit, by relating any violent crime against an immigrant or Muslim to the U.K’s June 2016 vote to withdraw from the European Union. Reporter David Kirkpatrick made Saturday’s front page by tying Brexit to “Islamophobia” in a sympathetic profile of a mosque in the London suburb of Barking under an overheated headline: “They’re Loathed as Outcasts, but This Is Home.” The subhead is “Losing London – A Backlash Against  Muslims.” Two other recent articles played the Brexit card, blaming the vote for hate crimes and causing political controversy in general.

As Wyoming Republican Senator John Barasso appeared as a guest on CNN's Wolf show, host Wolf Blitzer pushed for the creation of a national health insurance program along the lines of the Bernie Sanders "Medicare for all" plan as he claimed that a similar system used in Canada and Europe "works well."

Former CNN personality Piers Morgan and co-host Susanna Reid hounded a Conservative member of the British Parliament on ITV's Good Morning Britain on Wednesday over his Catholic views on sexuality and abortion. The pair wouldn't accept Jacob Rees-Mogg's repeated affirmation that he "support(s) the teaching of the Catholic Church" on traditional marriage, and badgered him to explicitly say he opposed same-sex "marriage." The anchors also challenged Rees-Mogg's unequivocal stance against abortion, even in cases of rape and incest.

Christopher Nolan’s film “Dunkirk” has received widespread praise from critics and audience members alike and currently maintains a whopping 93% ‘fresh’ rating at Rotten Tomatoes. Despite this, however, it has received some negative attention by critics who have denounced the picture for not featuring more minorities or women in it’s scandalous quest for historical accuracy. The Washington Post’s Richard Cohen, however, opted for a different route by praising the film as being, of all things, a ‘war film for the Trump era.’

Christopher Nolan’s new movie Dunkirk opened this weekend and is on target to become one of those iconic war movies, much like Saving Private Ryan did. Dunkirk is a gritty and heart-pounding movie that is vividly portrayed on the big screen with classic war themes of duty, trust, honor and the raw tragedy of war.

Anyone looking for another reason not to leave life-and-death issues to the state need look no further than the conflict between the British government and the parents of 11-month-old Charlie Gard. Governments, including the British courts and the European court of human rights have refused to allow Charlie's parents to take him to the U.S. for what they believe is life-saving treatment.

On Tuesday, NPR's All Things Considered channeled its inner millenial by airing a full segment on smartphone apps for singles in the U.K. who are opposed to Brexit. Lauren Frayer played up how "many British singles...have started posting how they voted — 'leave' or 'remain' — on their dating profiles." She also spotlighted the "Better Together Dating" app, which apparently "bills itself as Tinder for the 48 percent. That's the proportion of British voters who chose 'remain' in last year's EU referendum."

Appallingly, I came across this question in regard to the Charlie Gard case: “What duty of care do we owe them simply on account of their being human beings, who are by nature possessed of an inalienable dignity?” As a fellow human being, my only response is that we owe all human beings the best care possible. I thought most leftists would agree with this sentiment, given their generally misguided obsession with universal healthcare; however, this was proven wrong in a Slate article titled “The Right is Turning the Charlie Gard Tragedy into a Case Against Single-Payer Health Care. It’s the Opposite.”

In Wednesday’s New York Times, Dan Bilefsky and Sewell Chan reported from London on the tragic medical and legal controversy around the infant Charlie Gard: “Baby’s Illness Grows Tragic on Global Stage.” The text box declared the science settled, and the opinion of world leaders that the baby’s life should be fought for a mere nuisance that promises to make things worse: “Support from the pope and President Trump may give parents irrational hope."