Late last week, after word came that the former ambassador to Iraq, Joe Wilson, had passed away, MSNBC repeated some of the misinformation that journalists and other liberals pushed during the George W. Bush era as anchors Joy Reid and Katy Tur lauded Wilson for disputing President Bush's claims that Saddam Hussein had tried to acquire uranium in Africa before the invasion of Iraq.



DUBLIN — “When would you like to schedule your knee replacement surgery?” asked my American doctor before I left for Ireland. I gave him a date that works for me (I'm calling it the result of an old basketball injury, not advancing age). His office scheduled it for that date. Contrast this with a headline in the Irish Independent newspaper: “Surgery delays are ‘cheating elderly out of precious time.’”



Stephen Colbert sat down with British talk show host Graham Norton during Thursday’s edition of The Late Show. Not surprisingly, the two teamed up to trash the leaders of their respective countries: President Trump and Prime Minister Boris Johnson. Norton’s commentary definitely indicated that the infiltration of left-wing politics into comedy shows is not unique to the United States.



Keep government spending at high levels or die young. That’s the stark choice offered by reporter Stephen Castle in Saturday’s New York Times, “Why Are Britons Living Shorter Lives? – Austerity and Illness begin to Take a Toll.” The online headline deck: “Shortchanged: Why British Life Expectancy Is Falling -- For the first time in modern history, Britons are living shorter lives, with poor lifestyles, depression and budget cuts the leading causes.” Apparently the paper lacks historical sense, forgetting what actual austerity in Britain was like (not just today’s metaphorical “austerity”) during World War II and even years afterward;



New York Times London-based reporter Ceylan Yeginsu reported on the abortion debate in Belfast under a flawlessly biased headline: “Can Northern Ireland Cling To Its Draconian Abortion Laws?” The online headline was bad in a different way: "Climate of Fear: When Part of a Country Bans Abortion.” (“Bans abortion” is an odd way to describe a law that has been in place in Northern Ireland since 1861.)



As BBC's Years and Years, which has aired in the United States on HBO, came to a close with Episode 6 airing July 29, the writers couldn't help but throw in some more comparisons between evil Prime Minister Vivienne Rook (Emma Thompson) and President Donald Trump.



On Thursday, CNN International and PBS aired a segment in which Christiane Amanpour and her guests fear mongered about the collapse of the United Kingdom at the hands of Prime Minister Boris Johnson as well as the end of “a really great renaissance” in Britain.



There was no honeymoon for Boris Johnson, the new Conservative Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, in the New York Times. The same old hostility greeted him, and his push to make good on the 2016 referendum to leave the European Union, known as Brexit: "After a lifetime of joking and blustering and maneuvering his way into jobs and then sabotaging himself with poor preparation and deceitful behavior, Mr. Johnson, 55, seems determined to prove he can put aside his court-jesterish ways and rise to the occasion."



All three networks on Tuesday night offered up mocking, derisive reports on Brexit-supporting Boris Johnson winning his party's support and becoming the new British Prime Minister. ABC, CBS and NBC also highlighted comparisons of the conservative leader to Donald Trump. On World News Tonight, Ian Pannell derided, “To his opponents, he's an ambitious philanderer, unfaithful in marriage, accused of racism and of having no fixed principles. Many have compared him to Donald Trump.” 



The New York Times can’t stop whining about how the UK Conservative Party determines its membership. It’s an indirect way to bash Brexit, and Conservative front-runner for the Prime Minister slot Boris Johnson, under the guise of concern for democracy, which is why this obscure issue has become a Times obsession. The latest example appeared in the Sunday edition, “1% of Voters Will Pick Britain’s Prime Minister. The Rest Are Fuming.” The text box: “Brexit gridlock has many questioning a political system.” Just in time to oppose Brexit. How convenient!



Conservative Party members in the United Kingdom will be choosing their next party leader who will become Prime Minister. And Washington Post reporters William Booth and Karla Adam have sniffed their disapproval of the cut of their jibs starting with the fact that they don't think these voters are representative of the general population of Britain despite the fact that the vote is supposed to be composed entirely of Conservative Party members.



On BBC’s Episode 4 of Years and Years, which aired July 15 in the United States on HBO, it’s now 2027. The world continues to be in chaos, with financial and governing problems plaguing European nations. The United States is hit, too, as Roe v. Wade has finally been overturned, all these years later.