New York State’s Department of Labor recently made headlines with its rules mandating that employers paying their workforces with prepaid debit cards ensure that employees have “unlimited, free withdrawals” from at least one nearby ATM. This must be the case even if the employees have no bank accounts.

 



Reporters at the State Department's daily briefing were very impatient with the bobbing and weaving of spokespersons Mark Toner on Tuesday and Elizabeth Trudeau on Wednesday when they were questioned about $1.31 billion in payments out of the U.S. Treasury's Judgement Fund listed as having occurred on January 19, two days after several hostages were freed. It was also the first banking business day of that week.

If these journalists, who can't be expected to know everything about banking system mechanics, had better help — or any help — back at their main DC offices, the world might know more about these transactions than the Obama administration has thus far been willing to admit. 



It’s no secret that I’m very leery of Donald Trump. Simply stated, I don’t sense any genuine commitment to smaller government and free markets. But skepticism isn’t the same as bias and there is plenty of it in the media. As Julia Seymour at Newsbusters recently pointed out: 2 of 3 Networks Cover ‘Good’ Jobs News; All 3 Silent about Collapsing GDP. 



The media exuded panic surrounding the vote for the U.K. to leave the European Union, commonly called Brexit. Reports after the vote panicked over how much markets had fallen, worried about a potential recession for the UK and otherwise attacked the outcome. 



Thursday’s CBS This Morning was already on a roll as they dismissed Attorney General Loretta Lynch “innocent” meeting with former President Bill Clinton when they dug themselves further into the hole of liberal media bias as they giggled in pleading with an investment company guest to be Hillary Clinton’s Treasury Secretary under the assumption she becomes president.



The Federal Reserve announced it wouldn’t raise interest rates, in part due to a poor May jobs report and economic “headwinds.” Two out of the three broadcast networks ignored the decision.



President Obama and GOP House Speaker Paul Ryan want to expand it. Tax preparation companies and illegal immigrants are cashing in on it. Fraudsters have found bottomless ways to exploit it. The earned income tax credit, a bipartisan-supported "anti-poverty" benefit, is robbing honest, law-abiding Americans blind. 

 



Liberals often decry corporate greed, but a new report showed that the largest corporations donated $4.8 billion in charity. Three of the highest donating firms were typical media targets: Exxon, Walmart and Goldman Sachs. 



Former Reagan official David Stockman predicted that whoever was elected in 2016 would “inherit a recession.” Stockman, former Director of the Office of Management and Budget for President Ronald Reagan, said on May 25, 2016, that Wall Street would undergo “massive panic and selling.”

 



During an interview with the stars of the Hollywood’s latest anti-capitalist screed, Money Monster, on Friday’s NBC Today, correspondent Keir Simmons summed up the plot of the film: “In the movie, [George] Clooney is forced to wear an explosive vest by British rising star Jack O'Connell. Who lost his dead mother's money on stocks.” Simmons noted: “This guy is a terrorist, who you end up feeling sympathy for.”



In an analysis for the front page of Wednesday’s New York Times business section, Eduardo Porter trumpeted that the real issue ailing the American economy and impeding on its improvement is the lack of mass government jobs programs similar to its “large and underappreciated role in reshaping” the country during the 19th and 20th centuries. 



In case you didn't get the message the first or second time around, the Washington Post wants you to hear it again: Cool your complaints about the weak U.S. economy, because it's your fault.

To be clear, the problem is primarily with the Post's headline — "The economy’s real drag: Us" — than with Robert J. Samuelson's content, which at least gave American consumers credit for having "sobered up" as the reason for the increased savings rate which is supposedly holding the economy back. That said, the longtime Post writer missed a number of other key factors explaining why consumers aren't spending as they did in the decades before the recession.