CBS Actually Presses New Zealand’s Gun-Grabbing Prime Minister

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CBS, as well as the other two networks, routinely push gun control policies over gun rights by a large margin. So it was a welcome surprise to see the hosts of CBS This Morning on Wednesday actually quiz New Zealand’s Prime Minister over the morality and effectiveness of her newly enacted policies. 

Talking to Jacinda Ardern about laws passed in the wake of the tragic Christchurch shooting, Tony Dokoupil demanded, “Are you punishing law-abiding citizens while letting criminals continue with their criminal activity?” 

 

 

Dokoupil even wondered about whether gun buy backs do any good: 

When ideas like buy backs come up in this country one of the criticisms, and I know you heard it in your country as well is, “Look, law-abiding people are going to give you the guns back. But the criminals and potential terrorists, people you don't want to have the weapons, it's not like they're going to listen to the ban.” 

Of course, the hosts took time to praise teenage climate activist Greta Thunburg. Anthony Mason cheered, “One of the most-talked about, probably the most talked-about moment at the U.N. has been the speech by Greta Thunberg, a 16-year-old. Challenging the leaders of the world.” 

He wondered, “Do you think she made an impact?” CBS hosts have routinely praised the child, hailing the “warrior’s”  “panic” agenda. 

A partial transcript of the questions and some of the answers is below. Click “expand” to read more. 


CBS This Morning
9/25/19

8:03 AM ET 

GAYLE KING: World leaders are sharing mixed reactions to President Trump's attack on globalism during his united nations address. The President highlighted his America-first policies during yesterday's speech saying the future belongs to patriots. New Zealand's prime minister, Jacinda Ardern, is among the leaders in New York for the U.N. Secretary General Assembly. Her country, as you know, got global attention for implementing strict gun-control measures after the mosque shootings in Christchurch in March. Earlier this morning we spoke to her in an exclusive interview about her closed door meeting with President Trump this week and what he thinks of New Zealand's gun laws. Word is that our President did express interest in the measures that you implemented. What can you share with us about that meeting? 

...

KING: Did you get the impression he wants to do that here? 

JACINDA ARDERN: I got the impression he was interested. I would be second guessing anything beyond that. 

TONY DOKOUPIL: When ideas like buy backs come up in this country one of the criticisms, and I know you heard it in your country as well is, “Look, law-abiding people are going to give you the guns back. But the criminals and potential terrorists, people you don't want to have the weapons, it's not like they're going to listen to the ban.” 

ARDERN: One of the points we've tried to make is there's only a small proportion of people who —  small proportion of people who are licensed that commit crime, a small crime. If their guns are not stored properly, cared for properly, they are the ones that can turn to the black market. There's a connection there -- 

DOKOUPIL: Are you punishing law-abiding citizens while letting criminals continue with their criminal activity? 

...

KING: Sometimes our president has been criticized for what is seen as divisive rhetoric in this country. How do you think it's viewed on the international stage? 

...

KING: Only 23 of the 193 U.N. Member states have female leadership. 

ARDERN: Yes. 

KING: Well why do you think the number is so low? And what do you think, are there consequences when you don't have more female leaders? Hello, female leader. 

...

ANTHONY MASON: To Gayle's question before, what do you think the consequences for the entire world are when we have so few women leaders? 

ARDERN: I wouldn't want to make an assumption that just because you're a female that you'll produce particular political outcomes or policies. Everyone comes from their own perspectives. But you know, I don't mean to draw too many assumptions, but there will be times when we might choose to do things differently. And everyone brings personal experience to the table. And so particularly, you know, I think if you come as a mother, as a career, then it will influence the way you look at the world and issues. 

MASON: One of the most-talked about, probably the most talked-about moment at the U.N. Has been the speech by Greta Thunberg, a 16-year-old. Challenging the leaders of the world. 

ARDERN: As she well should. 

MASON: Do you think she made an impact? 

...

 

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