Not Woke Enough: ABC, CBS Sneer at ‘Problematic,’ ‘Inauthentic’ Green Book

ABC and CBS on Monday offered sneering shots at Green Book, the Oscar winner for best picture, as not being sufficiently enlightened enough. Deriding the movie as “problematic” and “inauthentic,” Good Morning America and CBS This Morning chided it as a film that “glosses over” Jim Crow-era horrors. 

GMA’s Chris Connelly described Green Book as a “race relations movie whose older school approach never did garner the critical approval earned by some best picture competitors.” The movie tells the true story of an African American pianist and his Italian-American driver in the 1960s. 

Speaking for many of the media critics, Connelly complained, “Well, time was when some movies featured black characters who have to show they are much better people than their white counter parts in order to be deemed worthy of being treated as equals. Problematic, you might think.” 

 

 

 He added that “critics of Green Book may see it as a film in that tradition.” Eventually, Connelly added that some think “each movie should stand on its own.” How charitable. 

Over on CBS This Morning, reporter Kevin Frazier dismissed, “The win was not without controversy. Some have called the film inauthentic and say it glosses over the true horrors of the Jim Crow south.” 

Both networks highlighted liberal filmmaker Spike Lee’s unhappiness at Green Book’s victory. Frazier noted, “Director Spike Lee stormed out of the theater when Green Book was announced as best picture.” Back on ABC, Connelly highlighted: 

You might have seen Spike Lee, who was reported to have taken exception Green Book’s win. Later, back stage, he compared it to his actions during a Knick game. “No, I thought I was court side at the Garden,” he said.” The ref made a bad call.” 

For all the attacks on the film, it should be pointed out that Harry Belafonte — no conservative — vouched for the film’s unflinching portrayal of the awfulness of bigotry: “This movie is accurate, it is true, and it’s a wonderful movie that everyone should see.” 

Partial transcripts are below. Click “expand” to read more. 

Good Morning America 
2/25/19
7:04 AM ET 

CHRIS CONNELLY: But the biggest prize of all, best picture, would go elsewhere — 

JULIA ROBERTS: And the Oscar goes to Green Book. 

CONNELLY: To a race relations movie whose older school approach never did garner the critical approval earned by some best picture competitors. 

...

CONNELLY: So, in the off-stage drama department, you might have seen Spike Lee, who was reported to have taken exception Green Book’s win. Later, back stage, he compared it to his actions during a Knick game. “No, I thought I was court side at the Garden,” he said.” The ref made a bad call.” So, what’s up? Well, time was when some movies featured black characters who have to show they are much better people than their white counter parts in order to be deemed worthy of being treated as equals. Problematic, you might think. Well, critics of Green Book may see it as a film in that tradition. Others say each story and each movie should stand on its own. It’s the Oscars best picture, guys. 

 

CBS This Morning
2/25/19
8:07AM ET 

JULIA ROBERTS: Green Book. 

KEVIN FRAZIER: An interracial friendship between a white driver and black pianist touring the south in the '60s, Green Book earned three Oscars, including best picture and best supporting actor for Mahershala Ali. 

[Clip from Green Book.]

FRAZIER: The win was not without controversy. Some have called the film inauthentic and say it glosses over the true horrors of the Jim Crow south. Director Spike Lee stormed out of the theater when Green Book was announced as best picture. 
 

 

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