Pipe Bomb Hysteria: NBC Tells Viewers How to Spot Bombs in Their Mail

NBC Nightly News anchor Lester Holt even admitted that “prior to this week's spree, postal inspectors say they’ve investigated just 16 mail bombs in recent years.” But that didn’t stop the network from trying to scare the wits out of their viewers with fears of bombs making their way into the family mailbox during Thursday’s broadcast.

Now, in a matter of days, at least ten explosive devices and potentially more out there. And as investigators hunt for a suspect, they’re also asking people to keep a sharp eye out for the hallmarks of a mail bomb,” Holt added while the on-screen headline read "BOMBS IN THE MAIL."

As NBC News correspondent Tom Costello began his report, he gave viewers a crash course on what a mail bomb looked like:

Postal inspectors say there are certain telltale signs of suspect packages: often lopsided with an irregular shape, sometimes wires aluminum foil or stains. Suspects often use excessive postage to avoid going inside the post office. Their handwriting, often distorted and the return address is often fake.

Costello explained that an effective way to find mail bombs was with screenings like what the government and media companies did. “The Secret Service screens the mail for anyone receiving protection, including former presidents. Capitol Police screen mail for members of Congress,” he said. “And since 9/11, many companies including media companies have been scanning their own mail.”

 

 

But average Americans had little hope according to NBC’s hysteria. Because despite the Postal Services’ “systems to detect explosives or biochemical agents, it can be a needle in a haystack.” “[M]ost American families and small businesses are on their own to watch for suspect packages,” Costello fretted. “If it doesn't look right, isolate the package, evacuate, and call police.”

Sure, the idea of getting a bomb in the mail did sound terrifying but how prevalent was the threat to the average American?

Holt said there were only “16 mail bombs in recent years” and according to FBI murder statistics, between 2017 and 2013 there were only 11 people murdered with explosives in the U.S. And while the liberal media has been talking about how heated the rhetoric has been since President Trump came to town, both 2015 and 2016 each saw only one murder with explosives. 2017 saw zero.

Earlier this year, Austin, Texas saw a rash of eight bombings from one suspect that injured 6 people and killed 3. But according to authorities, the attacks weren’t politically motived. Seven of the bombings involved packages but only two involved a parcel delivery service and were discovered before reaching their intended destinations.

Again, according to FBI murder statistics, between 2012 and 2010 there were 18 people murdered with explosives. So, if anything, there has been a relative decline in the number of murders with explosives in the U.S.

The fact that that argument had to be made was absolutely ridiculous considering murders by explosives accounted for fractions of a percent of overall murders in the U.S., but here we are. Thanks, NBC News for trying to spread hysteria.

The transcript is below, click "expand" to read:

NBC Nightly News
October 25, 2018
7:08 p.m. Eastern

LESTER HOLT: Prior to this week's spree, postal inspectors say they’ve investigated just 16 mail bombs in recent years. Now in a matter of days, at least ten explosive devices and potentially more out there. And as investigators hunt for a suspect, they’re also asking people to keep a sharp eye out for the hallmarks of a mail bomb. We get those details from NBC's Tom Costello.

[Cuts to video]

TOM COSTELLO: A staggering 150 billion pieces of mail move through the U.S. postal system each year, including nearly 6 billion packages. Postal inspectors say there are certain telltale signs of suspect packages: often lopsided with an irregular shape, sometimes wires aluminum foil or stains. Suspects often use excessive postage to avoid going inside the post office. Their handwriting, often distorted and the return address is often fake.

(…)

COSTELLO: MSA Security screens packages for government agencies and corporations all over the world. X-ray images are transmitted to the New York command center for analysis by veteran bomb squad officers. Now, on high alert.

(…)

COSTELLO: While the Postal Service has systems to detect explosives or biochemical agents, it can be a needle in a haystack. The Secret Service screens the mail for anyone receiving protection, including former presidents. Capitol Police screen mail for members of Congress.

And since 9/11, many companies including media companies have been scanning their own mail. But most American families and small businesses are on their own to watch for suspect packages.

(…)

COSTELLO: If it doesn't look right, isolate the package, evacuate, and call police. Tom Costello, NBC News, Washington.

NB Daily Mail Bombs Conspiracy Theories Broadcast Television NBC NBC Nightly News Video Lester Holt Tom Costello

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