Unhinged Joy Reid: Screw ‘Uniting’ the Country! ‘Trump Is Dangerous’ for Minorities!

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Well past midnight Thursday and in the latter stages of MSNBC’s post-Democratic debate analysis, AM Joy host Joy Reid uncorked a rant ripping into South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg, the notion of speaking about America in optimistic tones, and wanting to unite Americans because “Donald Trump is dangerous” to minorities such as Reid and her family.

Okay then. So for Reid, would that mean hatred is in (so long as it’s towards people you disagree with) and unity is out?

 

 

Reid began by asserting that, “for voters of color, there is no conversation of interest to talk about uniting” because the Republican Party “has given up not just its moral standing, but its soul to” President Trump and thus “[t]he danger of Donald Trump is much more extent” to “my immigrant relatives, to African-Americans, to Latinos.”

She continued by dismissing the emphasis on America needing to regain its global standing because America is currently posing an “imminent danger” “to people who look like me” with Trump being “dangerous to our families” and “our lives.”

Citing the spread of white supremacist propaganda at Syracuse where her youngest son is a student (even though its unclear who’s behind it), Reid stressed that “[p]eople are afraid to be in school right now and just being black or brown feels dangerous” while the “LGBT community feel their marriages are in danger.”

So, for all the talk on CNN, MSNBC, and in the rest of the liberal media about fear-mongering, perhaps they should look inward first at charlatans like Reid first.

Anyway, Reid continued to attack Buttigieg’s candidacy and calls for harmony in America which she later extended to Senators Bernie Sanders (I-VT) and Elizabeth Warren (MA) (click “expand”):

And so the idea of uniting and coming together, that sounds fine for Pete Buttigieg to say, you know, to middle class white America that wants to come together with their uncle who’s a Trumper. That's not going to work in communities of color and I think one of the fundamental challenges that Pete Buttigieg has is that he's not communicating to my community right now. He's not communicating to my community at all. On issues like policing, people want to know why he fired that police chief — getting, you know, saying that he's got a great, you know, long-term plan for black America, that's lovely....He speaks very well. He's quite articulate, that is not helping people who are afraid and want to know, can this guy connect to me? Can he connect to black people? Can he speak to African-American fears of the police? He's having a hard time doing that....He's a white candidate who’s quite popular with white voters, that says nothing to South Carolina voters who want to know, what are you going to do about policing and things we care about and immigrant issues and get those kids unlocked out of those cages? 

As for who she thought was doing the right thing, she cited Senators Cory Booker (NJ) and Kamala Harris (CA) because “they changed something about people — how people see them.”

Reid’s nonsense stood in stark contrast to the optimism expressed by MSNBC colleague and former Senator Claire McCaskill (D-MO), who stated before Reid that “they all did pretty well tonight, with a few exceptions” with Buttigieg having had “a great night” with Booker being “impassioned and optimistic.”

“[T]he ones that were the most optimistic and the ones having that oozing of the uniter thing like you're talking about, Steve [Schmidt], were in fact Cory Booker and Mayor Pete,” she added.

On a different topic while still related to Reid: Has anyone heard an update on whether she’s found the so-called real hackers of her blog that posted those homophobic posts?

To see the relevant transcript from MSNBC’s post-debate coverage on November 21, click “expand.”

MSNBC Post-Debate Analysis
November 21, 2019
12:39 a.m. Eastern

CLAIRE MCCASKILL: I thought, you know, they all did pretty well tonight, with a few exceptions. I still think we have too many people on the stage. 

BRIAN WILLIAMS: Mmmhmm.

MCCASKILL: We need to shrink the number of people debating. I'm not saying we need to narrow it to the top four, but ten's too many and I'm not really sure anybody really moved the needle tonight because they all did pretty well. I think Mayor Pete did have a great night. He showed he could pivot and punch, which, you're going to have to be able to do with Donald Trump. We're going to have — in a debate, you're going to have to pivot and punch and he did that very quickly with Tulsi Gabbard when she went after him with something that was just a bogus attack. He immediately said, hey, you know, I'm not going to let you get away with that and I thought Cory was impassioned and optimistic. I think of all the candidates on the stage tonight, the ones that were the most optimistic and the ones having that oozing of the uniter thing like you're talking about, Steve, were in fact Cory Booker and Mayor Pete. 

BRIAN WILLIAMS: Could you happily live in an America with any of those ten as President? 

JOY REID: Um — I think not any of the ten, not — maybe not any, but I mean, I think the very big difference, I think, we're seeing in the way that we're all discussing this race is the difference in the Democratic Party. I think for — particularly for voters of color, there is no conversation of interest to talk about uniting, to be blunt, with the party that has given up not just its moral standing, but its soul to that — to the person who is President of the United States right now. The danger of Donald Trump is much more extent to my community. 

WILLIAMS: Mmmhmm.

MCCASKILL: Mmmhmm.

REID: It's much more extent to both my immigrant relatives, to African-Americans, to Latinos, it's not about whether or not we can regain our public standing on the world stage and be seen as America, as America was, to people who look like me, it's about imminent danger. Donald Trump is dangerous to our families, he's dangerous to our lives. The, you know, my — my son, my — our youngest son goes to Syracuse University, where right now, you know, manif — the manifesto of the Texas shooter is being sent around to immigrant students, to black students, to Asian-American students. People are afraid to be in school right now and just being black or brown feels dangerous. LGBT community feel their marriages are in danger — in danger now. And so the idea of uniting and coming together, that sounds fine for Pete Buttigieg to say, you know, to middle class white America that wants to come together with their uncle who’s a Trumper. That's not going to work in communities of color and I think one of the fundamental challenges that Pete Buttigieg has is that he's not communicating to my community right now. He's not communicating to my community at all. On issues like policing, people want to know why he fired that police chief — getting, you know, saying that he's got a great, you know, long-term plan for black America, that's lovely. 

WILLIAMS: It’s huge. Yeah.

REID: He speaks very well. He's quite articulate, that is not helping people who are afraid and want to know, can this guy connect to me? Can he connect to black people? Can he speak to African-American fears of the police? He's having a hard time doing that and if he can — if he can't do that, he's not going to get the chance to change America on the world stage by being president of the United States because sorry, even if he wins Iowa, voters in South Carolina right now are sticking with Biden. I don't see that changing, even if he were to win Iowa because he's not proving something to South Carolina voters the way that Barack Obama had to do. He's a white candidate who’s quite popular with white voters, that says nothing to South Carolina voters who want to know, what are you going to do about policing and things we care about and immigrant issues and get those kids unlocked out of those cages? So, he's got to make a transition into the rest of the Democratic Party. I think, for Sanders, has a lot of the same issue, right? When he talks about class, it's really resonant to a lot of younger, you know, progressive black people, but in general, he hasn't broadened his base. I think Warren had a very good night. And, as usual, she was good, as she always is. She also needs to broaden her base. I think she's smart to broaden her discussion of health care to say maybe there's a transition, maybe there's a way we can let y'all try Medicare for All, let you try the public option and see how it works out for you before we force everyone onto it. Maybe that's a smart thing to do, but I still think out of everyone on that stage tonight, I think that Booker and at least, to me, Booker and Harris feel like they changed something about people — how people see them and I think that was important for the two of them to do. I don't think anybody had a terrible night except maybe Tulsi Gabbard, but I don’t know. I still walk away with it, thinking who resonated, who felt like they resonated was — was Kamala Harris.

NB Daily 2020 Presidential Debates Trump Impeachment Immigration Liberals & Democrats Race Issues Racism MSNBC Video Joy Reid Cory Booker Pete Buttigieg Kamala Harris Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren Claire McCaskill
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