Gutfeld: Harvey Response Shows Americans 'Aren't What the Media Says We Are'

On Wednesday and Thursday nights, FNC’s The Five co-host Greg Gutfeld offered moving commentaries about how the liberal media’s attempts to indict the American people as perpetually divided have utterly failed as exhibited by the Hurricane Harvey recovery efforts.

Gutfeld also discussed how Harvey has shown that the basic safety of each and every person in the face of death is what matters and not petty debates like replacing Columbus Day and taking down Confederate Statues.

“So, you know else takes a hit when disaster strikes? Opinions slingers like me, who are sidelined as we become like you, witnesses to real news, not fake news, real news. When all you have are visuals of human misery and human spirit, who needs me? The only thing that matters is helping the helpless,” Gutfeld began in his Wednesday commentary. 

Gutfeld noted that topics like Harvey are “real news” instead of “crud, like identity politics, MTV awards, [and] Kathy Griffin,” which “return to where they belong, toys in the closet, suddenly outgrown and forgettable.”

“Shallow minds can’t survive a flood, although some have tried. Slate, a blog, calls the heroism that we’ve seen a myth. Climate change apostles use crisis to mock skeptics. Academics joke about karma. The media knocks Melania for her shoes, and knocks Mr. Trump for his lack of empathy,” Gutfeld added in a nod to Slate’s childish outburst.

On the subject of Trump lacking sufficient empathy, Gutfeld pointed out how disastrous the Louisiana Governor and Mayor of New Orleans (both Democrats) were in Katrina even though they showed emotion:

Governor Blanco shed some tears while delaying National Guard troops for days. Mayor Nagin shouted emotionally on TV, but what about all of those buses left unused and then ruined by him? Or the Red Cross being delayed entry to New Orleans? Ultimately, Blanco went away. Nagin’s in jail. And President Bush won’t be remembered for turning the other cheek when both blamed him for their errors.

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Going back to the present, Gutfeld reminded us that it was only “weeks ago” when “the media used an evil act in Charlottesville to indict America,” but Harvey has decimated their case.

He then concluded with this amazing observation:

Now, Harvey arrives to repudiate that notion, writing a perspective that had been wronged for so long. We aren’t what the media says we are. Divided, hateful, evil, but the news has been telling us for years has been dispelled in just a few days. There is no room for spin when you see those rescues with your very own eyes. Americans are what those pictures are, selfless, color blind, inspiring. The news may be bad. But for once it shows us who you are really in time of crisis, good.

His Thursday piece was along much the same lines, opining that “[i]f you were to describe these last few days with one word, it would be 'rescued' because all we see are people being rescued” in both physical and psychological senses.

“But you're also seeing another kind of rescue, one from all of those conflicts that occurred before the flood. Stuff about statues and privilege and gender identity and trigger warnings. These stories still exist. But in times of crisis, they seem to fade. But some still pop up as a reminder of how things used to be. Right now there are cities who plan to place Columbus Day with Indigenous Day,” he added.

Gutfeld noted that debates over such trivial topics have transpired only because such leftists “have all that time on your hands to debate that stuff in dry, comfortable weather” while “people are being airlifted from certain death.”

The Five co-host explained that “[i]t’s such a powerful contrast, at least to me” as “these conflicts over statues and historical figures, they exist in good times because we have the time to discuss it., but a disaster rescues us from such reoccurring division.”

“Now, I know, we're supposed to hate each other, says the media and it must be hard for identity activists to see folks in trucker hats or hoodies, rescuing people of all stripes. They can't wait to get back to the rage when the waters receded, but for now, tribulation silences all tribes, it's the calm that came with a terrible storm,” Gutfeld stated in wrapping up his monologue.

Here’s the relevant transcript from FNC’s The Five on August 30:

FNC’s The Five
August 30, 2017
9:02 p.m. Eastern

[ON-SCREEN HEADLINE: Disaster & the Media]

GREG GUTFELD: So, you know else takes a hit when disaster strikes? Opinions slingers like me, who are sidelined as we become like you, witnesses to real news, not fake news, real news. When all you have are visuals of human misery and human spirit, who needs me? The only thing that matters is helping the helpless. And as real news erupts, crud, like identity politics, MTV awards, Kathy Griffin, they return to where they belong, toys in the closet, suddenly outgrown and forgettable. Shallow minds can’t survive a flood, although some have tried. Slate, a blog, calls the heroism that we’ve seen a myth. Climate change apostles use crisis to mock skeptics. Academics joke about karma. The media knocks Melania for her shoes, and knocks Mr. Trump for his lack of empathy. To that point, what did emotional expression get you in Katrina? Governor Blanco shed some tears while delaying National Guard troops for days. Mayor Nagin shouted emotionally on TV, but what about all of those buses left unused and then ruined by him? Or the Red Cross being delayed entry to New Orleans? Ultimately, Blanco went away. Nagin’s in jail. And President Bush won’t be remembered for turning the other cheek when both blamed him for their errors. Now it’s too soon to judge Mr. Trump on this, but you know its coming. Just weeks ago the media used an evil act in Charlottesville to indite America. Now, Harvey arrives to repudiate that notion, writing a perspective that had been wronged for so long. We aren’t what the media says we are. Divided, hateful, evil, but the news has been telling us for years has been dispelled in just a few days. There is no room for spin when you see those rescues with your very own eyes. Americans are what those pictures are, selfless, color blind, inspiring. The news may be bad. But for once it shows us who you are really in time of crisis, good.    Alright

LISA BOOTHE: That was great. 

GUTFELD: Well, thank you. Alright, my job is done.

BOOTHE: And we’ll see you after 10.

GUTFELD: It's a cliche, Lisa, but it’s like — often, it takes a specific trying experience to put everything in — in perspective.

Here’s the relevant transcript from FNC’s The Five on August 31:

FNC’s The Five
August 31, 2017
9:17 p.m. Eastern

[ON-SCREEN HEADLINE: Crisis in Context]

GREG GUTFELD: If you were to describe these last few days with one word, it would be rescued because all we see are people being rescued. That's too from rooftops, from cars. But you're also seeing another kind of rescue, one from all of those conflicts that occurred before the flood. Stuff about statues and privilege and gender identity and trigger warnings. These stories still exist. But in times of crisis, they seem to fade. But some still pop up as a reminder of how things used to be. Right now there are cities who plan to place Columbus Day with Indigenous Day. I don’t know what to think except that it's got to be cool to have all that time on your hands to debate that stuff in dry, comfortable weather. Meanwhile, people are being airlifted from certain death. It's such a powerful contrast, at least to me. Now, these conflicts over statues and historical figures, they exist in good times because we have the time to discuss it. But a disaster rescues us from such reoccurring division. Now, I know, we're supposed to hate each other, says the media and it must be hard for identity activists to see folks in trucker hats or hoodies, rescuing people of all stripes. They can't wait to get back to the rage when the waters receded, but for now, tribulation silences all tribes, it's the calm that came with a terrible storm. Kimberly, I'm trying to contrast between reality and made-for-tv outrage. You can talk — we can have discussions about Indigenous Day and all that stuff if we’re not — if we’re not living a horrible life. If we’re not thinking about how were going to get back to our home. 

NB Daily Charlottesville violence Hurricanes Harvey and Irma Conservatives & Republicans Liberals & Democrats Fox News Channel Other FNC The Five Video Greg Gutfeld Donald Trump Kathleen Blanco Ray Nagin
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