Tucker Carlson SLAMS the Lack of Journalistic Integrity In Media

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Given the blatant liberal bias in “journalism” today, there is little room to wonder why public confidence in the media has declined sharply in recent years. Former newspaper publisher, Walter Hussman, made an appearance on Thursday’s Tucker Carlson Tonight in an attempt to uncover what went awry in modern press.

Carlson’s introduction brought forth a staggering statistic regarding the credibility of the news business: “A recent Gallup Poll finds that only 41% of Americans trust the news media. That's a massive drop from the 1960s and 70s when a large majority trusted their own press.”

 

 

The first question posed by Carlson centered on the arena of print media in particular and its necessity to a democratic system of government:

So, you believe, and I think you make a great case for it, that in order to be really informed, in order to have a functioning democracy you have to have a thriving print media. Americans say, however, that they have lost a lot of faith in that medium. Why do you think that is?

Hussman spoke in no uncertain terms as to what the core mission of journalism ought to be and how that differs from the current state it finds itself in today:

Well, I think there's the perception that there is too much bias in the media and there's not enough separation between news and opinion. I see it myself. About two years ago, I heard some journalists saying things like don't believe in the false equivalency of giving both sides. Well, I mean, that's what I learned in journalism, you're always supposed to give both sides…And statements like, you know, I'm here to figure out what the truth is and then share that with you. That's not what we understand and our role is. Our role is not to divine the truth, our role is to gather all the facts, verifiable facts we can, and give those to the readers. Let them determine what the truth is.

After Hussman not so subtly slammed reporters for pompously believing they are arbiters of the truth for all of civilization, Carlson pondered as to whether conflicts of interest are taken into account when it comes to objective reporting:

So, recently, you've seen and you see it a lot, newspaper reporters, not columnist or opinion people, just daily beat reporters writing books in which they express -- in some cases, aggressively partisan opinions. Should that be allowed?

The answer Hussman presented was somewhat common sense information, unless you are a member of the liberal media: “No, we don't allow that. We would not allow reporters to write books about the subjects they cover.”

Hussman concluded with a plea for news outlets everywhere: “So, I hope this spreads and more and more news organizations adopt it and not just newspapers. I'd like to see broadcast and cable and other news organizations to let the public know what your values really are.”

Journalism is indeed a dying art, with precious few attempts being made to salvage the industry.

Transcript below:

Tucker Carlson Tonight

10/17/19

8:40:33 PM

TUCKER CARLSON: A recent Gallup Poll finds that only 41% of Americans trust the news media. That's a massive drop from the 1960s and 70s when a large majority trusted their own press. Walter Hussman is a newspaper publisher, we just spoke to him recently about this trend and how to fix it.

CARLSON: So, you believe, and I think you make a great case for it, that in order to be really informed, in order to have a functioning democracy you have to have a thriving print media. Americans say, however, that they have lost a lot of faith in that medium. Why do you think that is?

WALTER HUSSMAN: Well, I think there's the perception that there is too much bias in the media and there's not enough separation between news and opinion. I see it myself. About two years ago, I heard some journalists saying things like don't believe in the false equivalency of giving both sides. Well, I mean, that's what I learned in journalism, you're always supposed to give both sides.

CARLSON: Right.

HUSSMAN: And statements like, you know, I'm here to figure out what the truth is and then share that with you. That's not what we understand and our role is. Our role is not to divine the truth, our role is to gather all the facts, verifiable facts we can, and give those to the readers. Let them determine what the truth is.

(...)

CARLSON: So, recently, you've seen and you see it a lot, newspaper reporters, not columnist or opinion people, just daily beat reporters writing books in which they express -- in some cases, aggressively partisan opinions. Should that be allowed?

HUSSMAN: No, we don't allow that. We would not allow reporters to write books about the subjects they cover. For news or anything that's controversial. We have had feature reporters that might write a book on hiking trails in Arkansas or a food editor might write a book about recipes, I don't think that endangers our credibility at all. We would not let a reporter write a book about something they covered.

CARLSON: So, when you go, my last question I just can't resist asking you, when you go to conferences with other newspaper publishers and of course you know them all. What do they say about your standards and your approach to news?

HUSSMAN: You know, they generally agree with it. As a matter of fact, you know, a newspaper group in Kansas, the Seaton family, that's owned the Manhattan Mercury for over 100 years, they own ten daily newspapers. They've now adopted our statement of core values identically. And more importantly, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Journalism School has now adopted our statement of core values. So, I hope this spreads and more and more news organizations adopt it and not just newspapers. I'd like to see broadcast and cable and other news organizations to let the public know what your values really are.

CARLSON: Right. And a clear line between news and opinion -- I think that we have that here.

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