Tim Graham

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Executive Editor


Tim Graham is Executive Editor of NewsBusters and is the Media Research Center’s Director of Media Analysis. His career at the MRC began in February 1989 as associate editor of MediaWatch, the monthly newsletter of the MRC before the Internet era.

Graham is co-author with MRC president Brent Bozell of the books Collusion: How the Media Stole the 2012 Election and How To Prevent It From Happening Again in 2016 (2013) and Whitewash: What The Media Won’t Tell You About Hillary Clinton, But Conservatives Will (2007). He is also the author of the book Pattern of Deception: The Media's Role in the Clinton Presidency (1996).

Graham is a regular talk-radio and television spokesman for the MRC and has made television appearances on MSNBC, CNBC, CNN, Fox News, and the Fox Business Channel. His articles have appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Times, National Review, and other publications.

Graham left the MRC to serve in 2001and 2002 as White House Correspondent for World, a national weekly Christian news magazine. He returned in 2003. Before joining the MRC, Graham served as press secretary for the campaign of U.S. Rep. Jack Buechner (R-Mo.) in 1988, and in 1987, he served as editor of Organization Trends, a monthly newsletter on philanthropy and politics by the Washington-based Capital Research Center.

Graham is a native of Viroqua, Wisconsin and graduated from Bemidji State University in northern Minnesota. 

Latest from Tim Graham

Bre Payton at The Federalist reported on a shocking decision by The New York Times to out the CIA’s top official overseeing Iran, painting him as a “dark prince” pushing a hardline approach. Aren’t these the same journalists who were outraged in the Bush years that Valerie Plame was outed over the rationale for the Iraq War? And she was no longer a covert agent. Reporters Matthew Rosenberg and Adam Goldman began: "He is known as the Dark Prince or Ayatollah Mike..."


National Public Radio sells itself as the source and summit of political civility. That's fake news. NPR loves character-assassinating liberals....like Al Franken. He was given almost 50 minutes of book publicity on Tuesday for his tome Giant of the Senate, with NPR host Terry Gross gushing "It's the most brilliant book I've ever read."


Geoffrey Dickens noted Charlie Rose interviewed Al Franken for most of his hour on Wednesday and never brought up Kathy Griffin. The same thing happened on the PBS NewsHour. And a search of National Public Radio transcripts comes up empty for Kathy Griffin stories.​ So much for public broadcasting standing against the coarsening of public discourse. (UPDATED: NPR media correspondent tweeted that he did a one-minute report in hourly newscasts.)


Michael Calderone at HuffPost reported The New York Times is abolishing its office of “Public Editor,” established in the wake of the Jayson Blair fake-news scandal in 2003. Liz Spayd, the current staffer in that office, is effectively done, after only one year in the job, instead of an expected two-year term.

Once again, it is highly ironic that the nation’s top newspapers rage about the president being unaccountable to the public, while they abolish their own offices for dealing with reader complaints. It’s safe to guess they especially hate any articles about ideologically motivated bias and inaccuracy.


President Trump is back from his first foreign trip, and CBS “welcomed” him back by suggesting again that he can’t possibly win a long fight with the media.

On the May 28 CBS Evening News, reporter Errol Barnett quizzed Face the Nation host John Dickerson: “Now President Trump is back to tweeting his unedited opinions this morning, telling people among other things, quote, ‘Many of the leaks coming from the White House are fabricated lies, coming from the fake news media.’ Are his supporters still buying that same excuse?”


On Saturday morning's Weekend Edition, in the wake of the despicable bombing of the Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, NPR host Scott Simon welcomed staunch atheist Richard Dawkins, author of (most notably) The God Delusion, to discuss the role of "religion" in terrorism. Simon tiptoed around singling out one particular religion as the most prone to terrorism in this century.


Fox's John Stossel penned a column on the "Green Baloney" at The New York Times featuring a story headlined  "In Reversal, E.P.A. Eases Path for a Mine Near Alaska's Bristol Bay." He wrote "While this was just another of their stories about how Donald Trump will poison America, it caught my eye because of the big photo and because I once reported on that mine. Attempted mine, I should say. No holes have been dug." Obama's EPA denied it without any scientific investigation.


Soopermexican at The Right Scoop caught an amazing admission in the midnight hour on Friday morning, as CNN was beginning to mourn another Democratic loss in a special election for the House of Representatives. Media reporter Dylan Byers lamented that voters in Montana weren't even really paying attention to their incessant coverage of GOP candidate Greg Gianforte's violent treatment of Ben Jacobs, a reporter for the leftist British newspaper The Guardian, on the night before the election.


Al Franken has a new book out humbly titled Al Franken, Giant of the Senate. On that same level of attempted humor, his author’s biography states he received “his doctorate in right-wing megalomania studies from Trump University.” Stay classy, Sen. Franken.

Sycophantic press profiles of Franken express admiration for the “former comedian” as if the satire stopped. Just two months ago, The Washington Post gushed that in the Age of Trump, “the former comedian and satirist may be having a breakout moment as a political star."


Liberal bloggers love to mock the news judgment of Fox News, but CNN and MSNBC were truly displaying their affinity for Hillary Clinton on Friday by giving more than a half-hour of live coverage to her commencement speech at Wellesley College, her alma mater. In the previous hour, Vice President Mike Pence addressed graduates of the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, but neither network noticed that. The presidential loser was far more newsworthy than the sitting Vice President.


The proof keeps coming that despite their stated "policy" of not advertising on opinion shows, USAA has advertised on wild-eyed MSNBC programming speculating on how much proof there is that Donald Trump is the "laziest,  most ignorant president in history." Not much "news" in that show! Here's a USAA ad on MSNBC's The Last Word With Lawrence O'Donnell on March 24:


The advertisers publicly bowing to the Left and pulling ads from Sean Hannity's Fox show aren't getting cheers from their customers. The message board at USAA looks like there's some unhappiness. Meanwhile, the proof keeps coming that despite their stated "policy" of not advertising on opinion shows, USAA has advertised on wild-eyed MSNBC programming speculating on how much Donald Trump is owned by Russian strongmen and oligarchs. For example, our diggers found a USAA ad on MSNBC's The Rachel Maddow Show on May 2:


Fortune magazine reports that advertisers are being pressured by left-wing groups to drop their advertising on Sean Hannity's Fox News program, and at least five have complied with that campaign. But the obvious odd bird on that list is USAA, founded by Army veterans almost 100 years ago. This company's brand is all about support for veterans....and they're turning on Sean Hannity?

For years, Hannity has donated his time and his celebrity to promoting "Freedom Concerts" to raise money for the Freedom Alliance, which gives scholarships to the children of slain soldiers. Is that really the way the USAA demonstrates its support for veterans?


On Tuesday night, the leftish PBS documentary series Frontline aired a documentary titled “Bannon’s War” which seemed awfully reminscent of their anti-Cheney documentary suggestively titled “The Dark Side.” If you’re not a liberal PBS fanatic, it was another boring and predictable slog, attacking Bannon and Trump with lots of black and white photos and scary-sounding orchestral music.

It was more eye-opening to see the Frontline director and writer Michael Kirk appearing on C-SPAN’s Washington Journal to promote his anti-Bannon film on Tuesday morning, where made a flat-out false statement about Bannon’s resume, saying “He’d never been in the military.” What? Even Kirk's attack film discussed Bannon’s seven years in the Navy.


David Rutz at the Washington Free Beacon caught this political lede from The Washington Post Wednesday morning, that Pope Francis was the "world's moral counterpoint" to Trump's apparently immoral nationalism: "Pope Francis welcomed President Trump to the cradle of Roman Catholicism on Wednesday, delivering a message of peace even as the pontiff emphasized his role as the world’s moral counterpoint to the president’s nationalist agenda."

So how did the Post start its story when Obama met Francis at the Vatican in 2014? Was he the "world's moral counterpoint to the president's abortion agenda"? Of course not.


It was big news when Roger Ailes died. Everyone in his industry acknowledged that a serious, even transcendent force in American media and politics had passed away. Without Fox News over these last 20 years, the shape of American politics would be far different. A heretofore unanimously liberal media suddenly had a counter-weight, and much to their horror, this uppity network soon has surpassed all of its rivals in cable news -- combined. The era of unchallenged liberal enlightenment was over.  Roger was accused of making American dumber, angrier, and more bigoted. But one critic really stretched reality past the breaking point: Monica Lewinsky.


Sunday's New York Times Book Review displayed the newspaper's liberal tilt in two book reviews, side by side. On the left, Times editorialist Brent Staples lined up for another review lashing into David Garrow's Rising Star and defending Barack Obama and his highly fictional memoir Dreams from My Father. "Barack Obama vexed his biographers by beating them to his origin story," he began. "Critics have often pointed to misstatements, errors of fact and composite characterizations in the book without impeaching its central narrative."

This betrays a disdain for the importance of facts -- like stating that critics have pointed to Dan Rather's phony documents about George W. Bush, but they haven't "impeached his central narrative."


Sunday's Washington Post Magazine carried a cover story by Steven Levingston wrote about presidents mastering the "new media" of their time, or how Trump's mastery of Twitter compares to John F. Kennedy's mastery of television. But Levingston can't help but succumb to the liberal temptation to compare Kennedy's chumminess with a [shhh, liberal] press to Trump's "war with journalists," as if Trump could charm his way to better coverage.

Levingston could not stand Steve Bannon's "particularly extreme sentiment" that the press was an "opposition party" to Trump. But everything he wrote about JFK only underlined Bannon's point.


The Washington Post put Democratic scandal – former Rep. Anthony Weiner pleading guilty to “sexting” a 15-year-old girl -- over on page A-3 on Saturday. On the front was a story to make Democrats feel righteous. The headline was “New Orleans removes Confederacy monuments.” Post reporter Janell Ross wasn’t trying to hide her feelings about how wonderful it was: an end to "more than 130 years of publicly honoring a man who embodied Southern pride and racial oppression."

So how does the Post feel about Vladimir Lenin? Isn't he a communist oppressor? There's a Lenin statue in Seattle, and the Post thinks that's a "wacky joke," an appropriate art piece for a "holy place of hipsterdom."


National Review writer Jim Geraghty in his "Morning Jolt" e-mail linked to a Yahoo! column and wrote "Raise your hand if you expected John Brennan, who President Obama appointed to head the Central Intelligence Agency in 2013, to offer a qualified defense of Trump" on sharing intelligence with the Russians. Brennan wasn't completely impressed, but he was far unhappier with the leakers, and by extension the media that spread their information. His predecessor (as acting director), Mike Morell, also felt better about Trump in comparison to the leakers, who he felt should be prosecuted.