Tim Graham

Tim Graham's picture
Executive Editor


Tim Graham is Executive Editor of NewsBusters and is the Media Research Center’s Director of Media Analysis. His career at the MRC began in February 1989 as associate editor of MediaWatch, the monthly newsletter of the MRC before the Internet era.

Graham is co-author with MRC president Brent Bozell of the books Collusion: How the Media Stole the 2012 Election and How To Prevent It From Happening Again in 2016 (2013) and Whitewash: What The Media Won’t Tell You About Hillary Clinton, But Conservatives Will (2007). He is also the author of the book Pattern of Deception: The Media's Role in the Clinton Presidency (1996).

Graham is a regular talk-radio and television spokesman for the MRC and has made television appearances on MSNBC, CNBC, CNN, Fox News, and the Fox Business Channel. His articles have appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Times, National Review, and other publications.

Graham left the MRC to serve in 2001and 2002 as White House Correspondent for World, a national weekly Christian news magazine. He returned in 2003. Before joining the MRC, Graham served as press secretary for the campaign of U.S. Rep. Jack Buechner (R-Mo.) in 1988, and in 1987, he served as editor of Organization Trends, a monthly newsletter on philanthropy and politics by the Washington-based Capital Research Center.

Graham is a native of Viroqua, Wisconsin and graduated from Bemidji State University in northern Minnesota. 

Latest from Tim Graham

A reporter at the leftist German news magazine Der Spiegel — who won CNN’s Journalist of the Year Award in 2014 — resigned on Wednesday after a "comprehensive confession" of Faking the News like a Janet Cooke or Jayson Blair. At least 14 of the 60 articles he submitted to the magazine were fraudulent. 



On ABC's Jimmy Kimmel Live on Tuesday, Kimmel had "God" (Billy Crystal) and "Satan" (Foo Fighters frontman Dave Grohl) fighting over who was stuck with Sen. Ted Cruz for eternity. "Satan" lost Rock-Paper-Scissors, so Cruz was comically destined for Hell. Senator Cruz tweaked Kimmel hard about beating him in a charity basketball match in June.



Twenty years ago, on December 19, 1998, the House of Representatives voted to impeach President Bill Clinton on two counts: perjury to a grand jury, and obstruction of justice. Back then, the liberal media howled about its injustice and since Clinton had a high approval rating, they insisted it would damage the Republicans for years to come. Keep these quotes in mind if the new Democratic majority in the House moves to impeach President Trump.



One of the reasons people decry the “fakeness” of the news is the selectivity of which heart-rending anecdotes are “news,” and which are not – unless they can be blamed on undesirable politicians. On December 14, The Washington Post published an online story headlined “A 7-year-old immigrant girl died after she was detained by border patrol.” The reader's immediate assumption: she died at the hands of the Border Patrol. 



The dominant story on the front page of Tuesday’s USA Today was incredibly one-sided on “transgender equality.” Above and below a picture of trans man Grayson Russo were the headlines “Some Americans are denied ‘lifesaving’ health care / Because they identify as transgender.”  Right under the headline is a large pull quote to add to the theme: “These are lifesaving procedures, and to deny somebody a lifesaving procedure is malpractice,”



In case you couldn't get enough of Chris Hayes and Rachel Maddow on MSNBC TV, Maddow chatted with Hayes last month for his online podcast. Maddow was discussing her podcast about former vice president Spiro Agnew, and how he was a corrupt racist demagogue like George Wallace. Then came her declaration 'I am a religious person...who has a belief in God," and then shortly after mocked Liberty University as "founded by a televangelist so that your Christian child wouldn't be corrupted by actual higher education."



Our colleague Mark Finkelstein noticed on Twitter just how quickly the Associated Press jumped to label the Texas judge who ruled against Obamacare. Ricardo Alonso-Valdivar began: "A conservative federal judge in Texas has ruled the Affordable Care Act 'invalid' on the eve of the sign-up deadline for next year. But with appeals certain, even the Trump White House said the law will remain in place for now."



Five years ago, just weeks after Martin Baron took over as Executive Editor of The Washington Post, the newspaper canceled the position of Ombudsman, who brought reader concerns back to the news room. Every once in a while -- as in once a year or so, depending on who was serving -- the reader's advocate would address complaints of liberal bias. Now, the Washington Post Magazine is examining how their liberal articles aren't liberal enough



The Washington Post hilariously demonstrated on Sunday just how precisely it can lay out a page to bury uncomfortable copy about the Left. On the front page of the Metro section was an article titled "Women's March to unveil a platform." Reporter Marissa J. Lang didn't exactly skip over the march organizers being fans and friends with Rev. Louis Farrakhan of the Nation of Islam, but the newspaper's layout organizers precisely tucked away the controversy under what they call the "jump" to an inside page.



Cameron Cawthorne at the Washington Free Beacon reported that Thursday night's CNN Tonight began with host Don Lemon looking annoyed at Chris Cuomo, asking an exasperated "Why?" as in why he would dedicate 39 minutes of his show to squabbling with Kellyanne Conway. Lemon thinks Conway is a complete waste of time. He obviously thinks porn star Stormy Daniels is a more respectable guest. 



Talk-radio host and friend Chris Plante recently made an excellent point about Hollywood. As horrible new revelations of sexual misbehavior surface about CBS CEO Les Moonves, it’s highly unlikely anyone’s going to make a movie about him, or about Matt Lauer, or about Charlie Rose, and so on. But there are two fictional projects supposedly based on (and a new documentary about) the late Fox News boss Roger Ailes. 



On Don Lemon's show CNN Tonight on Wednesday, liberal analyst Joan Walsh slammed First Lady Melania Trump for "whining" in a Sean Hannity interview about how the media mangles history on this presidency. On Thursday's The Five on Fox News, Greg Gutfeld let Walsh have it: "It's very interesting that feminists are all about leaning in -- #MeToo, you go, girl -- until you disagree with them. And then they're -- they're as chauvinistic and sexist as the next guy."



On Monday night’s Late Night with Seth Meyers on NBC, his staff writer Jenny Hagel uncorked a commentary attacking Pope Francis as a fountain of “hate speech.” In a new book-length interview titled The Strength of a Vocation, the Pope said the Catholic Church shouldn’t be scandalized by sexually active (and activist) homosexual priests. It’s not exactly a new stand for Popes, but this one was supposed to be "cool."



Fox News media reporter/anchor Howard Kurtz broke the scoop that the Trump White House cancelled the annual Christmas party with the press. This shouldn't be that much of a surprise, in that the Trumps haven't attended the White House Correspondents Association dinner, and after the court fights over the brief suspension of CNN yeller Jim Acosta's press pass, it was not going to be a chummy get-together. 



The "independent fact checkers" at PolitiFact displayed their liberal stripes again this week by hailing the liberal student activists of Parkland High School as their victimized heroes of their 2018 "Lie of the Year." The "online smear machine" that tired to "take down Parkland students" was singled out as the very worst. 



National Public Radio is out begging for donations this week, with major stations like Washington’s WAMU offering gifts like those silly reusable grocery bags touting the “The Power of Truth.” But the truth can be pretty embarrassing. Apparently, NPR exploits cheap labor. Washington Post media reporter Paul Farhi has revealed that 20 to 22 percent of NPR’s 483 union-covered newsroom workforce, or one in five employees, are temps...and they’ve been doing this for decades. 



Washington Post nonfiction book critic Carlos Lozada underlined how well he matches his paper's red-hot hatred of the current president in his list of the "most memorable books I read in 2018." Cable-news personalities made the list, both good (CNN's Amanda Carpenter) and bad (Fox host Jeanine Pirro). 



The Right Scoop professed surprise that CNN morning anchor Christine Romans reported on the latest unemployment figures without the usual agony over the Trump administration.The jobs number was "weaker than expected," they said. But Romans suggested the expectations were too high at this "very low" unemployment rate:



NPR political editor Domenico Montanaro reported results of a new poll with a typically stacked question:  "Which of the following statements comes closer to your opinion about special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into possible wrongdoing and Russian interference in the 2016 election? 'It's a fair investigation' or 'It's a witch hunt'?" Still, seven in ten Republicans picked "witch hunt," but independents wouldn't go that far.



Peter Hasson at the Daily Caller made the Drudge Report on Thursday underlining how Snopes.com, "a left-leaning fact-checking website given preferential treatment by Facebook and Google, botched its fact-check of a viral meme that was mocked within political circles for spreading false information." Politico reporter Jake Sherman called the meme "insane fake news."