Tim Graham

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Executive Editor


Tim Graham is Executive Editor of NewsBusters and is the Media Research Center’s Director of Media Analysis. His career at the MRC began in February 1989 as associate editor of MediaWatch, the monthly newsletter of the MRC before the Internet era.

Graham is co-author with MRC president Brent Bozell of the books Collusion: How the Media Stole the 2012 Election and How To Prevent It From Happening Again in 2016 (2013) and Whitewash: What The Media Won’t Tell You About Hillary Clinton, But Conservatives Will (2007). He is also the author of the book Pattern of Deception: The Media's Role in the Clinton Presidency (1996).

Graham is a regular talk-radio and television spokesman for the MRC and has made television appearances on MSNBC, CNBC, CNN, Fox News, and the Fox Business Channel. His articles have appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Times, National Review, and other publications.

Graham left the MRC to serve in 2001and 2002 as White House Correspondent for World, a national weekly Christian news magazine. He returned in 2003. Before joining the MRC, Graham served as press secretary for the campaign of U.S. Rep. Jack Buechner (R-Mo.) in 1988, and in 1987, he served as editor of Organization Trends, a monthly newsletter on philanthropy and politics by the Washington-based Capital Research Center.

Graham is a native of Viroqua, Wisconsin and graduated from Bemidji State University in northern Minnesota. 

Latest from Tim Graham

Apparently, bringing on fake conservative David Brooks on the PBS NewsHour on Friday night for a fake debate ("I agree with Mark Shields and the liberal consensus") isn't enough fun. On Monday night, NewsHour anchor Judy Woodruff interviewed former Bush aide Peter Wehner as the David Brooks Stand-In, and he made Brooks look mild-mannered. Not only is President Trump a racist, but so are his supporters, said the so-called “lifelong conservative.” 


In the contest for Most Offended News Network after President Trump reportedly referred to African nations as “s***hole” countries, CNN should win hands down. NewsBusters staff combed through CNN transcripts on Nexis for the S-hole word in the 24 hours of January 12 – the first full day after The Washington Post reported the controversy – and found CNN staffers and CNN guests uncorked the profanity 195 times in one day. Compare that to Fox News Channel. Their curse count was zero. FNC told staff and guests not to say it.


It’s astonishing that the same people who think Donald Trump exaggerates things out of proportion can happily promote a forthcoming Senate floor speech making the assertion that Trump is comparable to Josef Stalin, a mass-murdering totalitarian. But that’s just what happened Sunday night on Kasie Hunt’s MSNBC show. She blithely introduced an interview: “He gave me a preview comparing the president’s words to dictators past.”


In the midst of reports of the president’s unfortunate reference to immigration from “s---hole” countries, the PBS NewsHour analysts were agreeing with each other on everything on Friday, but NPR’s Week in Review segment brought listeners an actual debate. Conservative Orange County Register columnist John Phillips was back to shock NPR snobs with a pro-Trump set of arguments. 


ABC Nightline host Dan Harris is promoting a new book called Meditation for Fidgety Skeptics. One way the self-described “unabashed meditation evangelist” pushed his message was a Time magazine essay on “How meditation can help in the era of angry politics.” He wrote about how conservatives seek "liberal tears" and liberals? Their "hearts soar" every time Robert Mueller gets closer to impeaching Trump. 


The liberal website Slate talked to New York Times movie critic A.O. Scott about a thorny subject: how do we evaluate the art of Hollywood creeps after they are exposed for preying on women. Scott took a shot at how quickly NBC News is running away from Matt Lauer, a “blatant act of corporate ass-covering.”


The Hollywood Foreign Press Association, which hosts the Golden Globe Awards, may have provided the rocket fuel for Oprah Winfrey for President in 2020. Her acceptance speech for their Cecil B. DeMille Award struck the perfect pose for the Hollywood establishment. They have seen themselves as the uninterrupted social conscience of America for as long as they’ve made motion pictures. That’s ridiculous.


CNN anchor Jake Tapper appeared on the show Late Night with liberal NBC talk-show Seth Meyers in the early hours of Friday morning. Unsurprisingly, Meyers gave Tapper a kind of victory lap for the contentious Sunday talking-over-each-other interview with Trump aide Stephen Miller. Tapper oddly suggested that if he called Trump something insulting like a “flunky,” that Seth Meyers would be disappointed and wished he hadn’t done that. Excuse me? Seth Meyers, who called Anthony Scaramucci a “human pinky ring”? And compared Trump to a serial killer?


CNN host Anderson Cooper played the comedian on Monday night, mocking President Trump in his feature "The Ridiculist," comparing Trump's "stable genius" quote to two old comedy animals: Wile E. Coyote and Mr. Ed, as well as Mindy Kaling's character on The Office. Trump is always mocked for besmirching the seriousness of the office of President, but no one has that kind of respect for the office of Anchorman. They've besmirched it with their own arrogance, that everyone must have their snarky "take" on the world. 


CNN anchor Chris Cuomo granted an interview to The Hollywood Reporter to plug his temporary prime-time show, expressing his eagerness to "test power" with aggressive face-to-face interviews, like his usual marathons badgering Trump adviser Kellyanne Conway. When asked about how even current and former Fox hosts from Tucker Carlson to Bill O'Reilly questioned the brilliance of a Trump lawyer suing to cease and desist publication of the Michael Wolff book, Cuomo said they weren't really journalists.


In the midst of their media feeding frenzy over Michael Wolff’s gossipy and fact-mangling book on the Trump White House, there was another piece of news that broke. On January 4, the FBI announced it had returned to investigating the Clinton Foundation. Yawn. First, they ignored it. Then, they touched on it for half a story, followed by pundits insisting that there is “nothing new,” as if they have access to whatever the FBI is seeking.


The Washington Post devoted a news story on Tuesday to President Trump’s attendance at the college football championship in Atlanta. But the story by Marwa Eltagouri and Sonam Vashi concentrated on tiny protests by leftists. The “smattering of boos” was defined as news.


During an interview with anti-Trump author Michael Wolff on Monday, MSNBC morning host Joe Scarborough complained that he has twice tried to include unproven references to President Trump suffering from an early stage of dementia in his columns for the Washington Post, but both times the editors told him to remove those references.


On his Friday show, Rush Limbaugh responded to the brouhaha over Michael Wolff’s over-the-top book claiming everyone who works for President Trump knows he’s mentally unfit for office. Limbaugh said the American people ought to compare Trump to Barack Obama and ask which president truly seemed insane in what he was doing in office.


On National Public Radio on Saturday morning, Weekend Edition anchor Scott Simon interviewed Ed Martin, a pro-Trump author and Republican Party man, reveling in the Donald Trump-Steve Bannon feud. Simon claimed Bannon said the president has "lost it," meaning his mind. He asked Martin if he was "supporting a president who is incapable of being entrusted" with nuclear weapons?


PBS NewsHour anchor Judy Woodruff interviewed former vice president Joe Biden on Thursday night, and most of it consisted of please-attack-Trump softballs. Woodruff's most urgent pushback to Biden came on when he would be apologizing to Anita Hill for somehow mistreating her during the 1991 Hill-Thomas hearings. When Biden said he hadn't contacted Hill, Woodruff shot back "Do you plan to?" This is odd, since the PBS anchor should spend some time on her show exploring sexual harassment at PBS. 


Steven Spielberg has made a new movie glorifying The Washington Post and how it rallied against Richard Nixon and the Vietnam War in the Pentagon Papers court fight of 1971. It’s simply called The Post, and everyone is drawing a comparison between Nixon's difficult relationship with the press and Donald Trump's. The media, of course, were guaranteed to gush over this movie that polishes their historical apple. Time magazine called it “a superhero movie for real grownups.”


Seth Meyers did a big round of promotional interviews about his gig hosting the Golden Globes awards on Sunday nights and how he’ll address “the elephant in the room” of sexual harassment in the entertainment industry. One easy sign of how soft every single interviewer is: No one asked Meyers about NBC’s Matt Lauer. Everywhere he went, Meyers claimed he'd strike a balance of sympathy for the victims and mockery of the perpetrators. But Meyers pal Amy Poehler told Dave Itzkoff at The New York Times that Meyers is a sensitive male who knows “what his privilege permits him and what it denies him.”


On the front of Thursday's Style section, Washington Post media reporter Paul Farhi wrote a piece on blazing-hot author Michael Wolff and his Trump book Fire and Fury. The headline was "A whale of a Trump tale, but is it fishy?" Inside, the headline is "Wolff made up quotes, some of his sources say." 


Amateur psychoanalysis of Donald Trump is a constant theme of “objective” reporting these days, but MSNBC went Full Freud on Tuesday night’s All In, with MSNBC analyst Anand Giridharadas insisting we might all die at any minute because Trump’s “profound sexual and masculine insecurities are literally threatening to annihilate the planet.”  MSNBC surely considers this paranoid analysis a “statement of fact.”