September 11 is a sacred day for America where we try to put our political squabbles aside and come together to moan an unbelievable tragedy. But not on CNN’s New Day Sunday where they complained that American’s don’t know the “empathetic leader” Hillary Clinton was after the attack. “A British newspaper and New York radio station are claiming the Clinton of today is vastly different than the Clinton we got to know during the 9/11 tragedy, specifically that New Yorkers got to know,” stated co-host Christi Paul leading off the segment. 



On Sunday’s Reliable Sources CNN’s Brian Stelter brought up a serious issue for journalists,Hillary Clinton's major lack of press conferences. He brought on NPR’s White House Correspondent Tamara Keith to discuss the importance of pressers. “So with a press conference, you can pull out more information, or you can -- or it will be more clear that the candidate simply isn't answering,” she explained. But Stelter was more interested with Clinton’s health conspiracies than say a real issue, such as the e-mail scandal.



Former New York City Mayor and Trump supporter Rudy Giuliani engaged in a tense back-and-forth with MSNBC’s Hardball host Chris Matthews on Wednesday night over Trump’s Second Amendment comments, but it was Giuliani absolutely schooling Matthews on the latest developments involving Hillary Clinton’s e-mail and Clinton Foundation scandals that stood out.



While a guest on Monday's MSNBC Live program, former Vermont Governor Howard Dean could barely control his anger when host Kate Snow asked: “Donald Trump is zeroing in” on Hillary Clinton's “use of the term 'short-circuited.' Why is she struggling to answer those questions about her e-mail?”

Dean, who is best known for his “Dean Scream” on January 19, 2004, after suffering a serious loss in the presidential primary, responded: “I don't think she's struggling. She's answered” questions on that topic “9,000 times.”



There’s the entertaining kind of irascible old guy (e.g., Grampa Simpson) and there’s the scary kind, which several liberal pundits thought they beheld Monday night as they watched Rudy Giuliani speak at the Republican convention. Talking Points Memo editor and publisher Josh Marshall remarked that “ever since the late and great Molly Ivins quipped that she thought Pat Buchanan's speech at the 1992 GOP convention sounded better in the original German it's been sort of a parlor trick to compare a 'hot' Republican speech to one from this or that fascist dictator. But this speech was really febrile and unhinged." Fred Kaplan of Slate claimed that Giuliani “spew[ed]…rank nonsense” and “delved into the shallowest realm of Trump’s attack on Obama’s (or Obama-Clinton’s) counterterrorism policies—the refusal to call our enemy by their name."



Playing on long-established stereotypes of the melanin-challenged Republican Party, New York Times coverage of the Republican National Convention on Wednesday put racial controversies front and center, accusing speakers (particularly Rudy GIuliani) of lecturing and moralizing to blacks about law and order as an all-white crowd lapped it up. The paper led with Melanie Trump's speech with this wishful thinking headline: “How Speech for a Trump Stumbled Toward Ridicule – As G.O.P. Nominates the Businessman, His Wife’s Oration Shadows Convention.”



MSNBC host, NBC News Clinton campaign correspondent and senior Clinton apologist Andrea Mitchell offered her latest Clinton spin on Tuesday during the Republican National Convention (RNC) by whining that the Clinton scandals ranging from Whitewater to Hillary’s e-mail scandal “will never be resolved to the satisfaction of the conspiracy theorists.”



The majority of the panel on Tuesday’s The View were furious about former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani’s speech defending police officers at the RNC last night. Panelists Joy Behar, CNN’s Sunny Hostin, ABC’s Sara Haines and Whoopi Goldberg blasted the Mayor for his tone and message, calling him “nutty,” “berserk” “lunatic” and “divisive” while FNC’s Jedediah Bila was the only panelist to defend Giuliani’s speech.



MSNBC’s AM Joy host Joy Reid bemoaned in Tuesday’s early hours at the Republican National Convention (RNC) that Melania Trump’s plagiarized speech was unfortunately “the first of the night that didn’t have this subtext...that brown people are dangerous” to the point that Reid felt uncomfortable being around the RNC that she found to be so “not inclusive.”

 



New York Times former editorial page editor Andrew Rosenthal, perhaps the most self-satisfied liberal on a Times staff that’s not exactly running short of them, was in rare form on the eve of the Republican Convention in Cleveland, going after multiple “racist” and bigoted GOP targets and comparing them to various notorious dictators.



An unprofessional reporter and his equally failed co-worker displayed one of the worst cases of extreme bias in the newspaper business. Gee, did you think your humble correspondent was being perhaps a bit too harsh in his assessment of reporters Denis Slattery and Adam Edelman of the New York Daily News? Not after you read their article which is like extreme bias on steroids. Without even the slightest hint of subtlety they let their biases unashamedly hang out just dripping with obvious hate for all to see. You will already have an idea where they are going with the story just from the title, Rudy Giuliani, Tim Tebow among oddball speaker lineup at next week’s Republican National Convention



Well, the New York Times didn’t actually call former NYC mayor Rudy Giuliani a racist in its lead editorial Tuesday, which it has strongly implied in the past on its news pages. That’s about the best that can be said for “Rudy Giuliani’s Racial Myths,” in which the Times attacks its old enemy as a race-baiter for criticizing Black Lives Matter, which the paper referred to as a “civil-rights movement” on Sunday’s front page. Meanwhile, actual race-baiter Al Sharpton is portrayed in the Times lecturing others on race-baiting.