At the Associated Press on Friday, economics writer Paul Wiseman attempted to rewrite history, pretending that "trickle down" economics is a term Republicans have used for their economic plans since the days of Ronald Reagan, and that the current GOP tax plan which has made it through the House and is being considered by the Senate is more of the same thing. In fact, Reagan's policies, which were supply-side, growth-oriented and behavior-changing, did not cause only tiny amounts of money to "trickle down" to everyday Americans; they instead led to explosive and sustained employment and across-the-board income growth which hasn't been seen since.



As liberal playright and Vagina Monologues creator Eve Ensler appeared as a guest on Wednesday's Tavis Smiley show on PBS, she and host Smiley ruminated over why so many women voted to make Donald Trump President in spite of his history of harassing women, with the two drawing a parallel between women and blacks who are "self-loathing" or have "self-hatred."



The third season of Amazon’s Red Oaks aired October 20th in six thirty-minute episodes. A comedy series, it is a quick binge that is actually enjoyable. In today’s entertainment world, finding something fun to watch can feel like chasing a unicorn.



In the latest episode of the CW’s Crazy Ex-Girlfriend that aired on October 20, titled “To Josh, With Love,” main character Rebecca (Rachel Bloom) continues her pursuit to find someone to help her take revenge against her ex-fiancé, Josh Chan (Vincent Rodriguez, III), for leaving her at the altar. This week her evil conservative boss, Nathaniel Plimpton (Scott Michael Foster), gets involved.



In school, I liked math the least and history the most. Both can be useful in the coming debate over President Trump's proposed tax reforms. The one thing I learned in math class is that if the formula is wrong, the answer will be wrong. In history class, I learned we are not the first people to occupy the planet and that the experiences of those who came before us can be helpful when considering contemporary issues.



Will & Grace returned to television after an 11-year hiatus September 28 to ruin the good memories we had of watching Will & Grace in the past. The episode, "11 Years Later," took three minutes to catch us up on what we missed in the intervening years, then dove right into politics. It didn't let up in the entire episode, which was written around a trip to Washington, D.C. as an excuse to talk politics without the writers having to be clever.



An alliance of far-leftists and Never-Trumpers has formed a group called the "Committee to Investigate Russia." In a video posted on Monday, octogenarian actor Morgan Freeman contended that the United States is "at war" with Russia. On Thursday, Fox News's Tucker Carlson interviewed actor and director Rob Reiner, a member of that group's advisory board. Despite Reiner's outwardly cool demeanor, Carlson's lines of questioning seemed to catch the guy who is still perhaps best known for having played "Meathead" back in the 1970s on CBS's All in the Family utterly off-guard.



The reception given to Sally Quinn's new book, Finding Magic, has been strangely quiet. Perhaps that's because the book shamelessly reveals that since 1973, if not earlier, Quinn, who was the nation's capital's de facto social gatekeeper for several decades, deceived the world about the true nature of her "religious" outlook, and did so with the help of the rest of the Washington press corps — that is, if one considers belief in the occult, practicing voodoo, and supposedly communicating with ghosts (sound familiar?) the foundations of a "religion."



FX’s Snowfall has finally come to its season finale, and it honestly couldn’t get here fast enough for me. The long, drawn-out stories of characters making down-right awful choices has never been a turn-on for me, and ten episodes is ten too many. The final insult comes from one last jab at former President Ronald Reagan.



Was Ronald Reagan the original Washington wizard? Esquire’s Charles Pierce seems to think so. Pierce argued on Wednesday that in the 1980s, an ideological “spell…was cast” by the Gipper and his allies, and that as a result of various right-wing policies enacted since then, Harvey-related damage to the Houston area will be a lot worse than it should have been. “The spell…was cast 30 years ago, when conservative movement politics pitched deregulation as a panacea,” wrote Pierce. “It was cast 30 years ago when conservative movement politics declared that important decisions on things like the environment and public health were better left to the states, despite the fact that many states, like Texas, were unable or unwilling to pay to do these jobs properly.”



On Labor Day, CNN will air The Reagan Show, a new film bashing the 40th president. In case you thought it would be anything other than hostile, the ads make the goal clear. A clip of Reagan saying, “Together we will make America great again,” is paired with a blurb from the website Screen Daily: “An elaborately constructed parable for the Trump era.” 



If the late Tuesday and early Wednesday Don Lemon-led CNN Tonight wouldn’t go down in infamy for its deranged reaction to President Trump’s Arizona rally, the 1:00 a.m. hour drove the nail in the coffin. Most significantly, Lemon falsely claimed that Ronald Reagan already had Alzheimer’s Disease while President and Reliable Sources host Brian Stelter’s fear-mongering got smashed to pieces by conservative Ben Ferguson.