WASHINGTON — It has been a pretty good week for Donald Trump. The economy is growing faster than anyone on the left or in the middle or among the Never-Trumpers believed possible. Inflation is low, and employment is at a record high. Moreover, the president and the European Union reached an understanding on trade last week that signals the likely end of a trade war, at least with Europe.



There were two developments Monday in the disgraceful year-long, media-underplayed saga involving threats on Kentucky Republican Senator Rand Paul's life. First, federal prosecutors appealed the 30-day sentence given to Rene Boucher, who violently assaulted Paul in November. Meanwhile, as NewsBusters' Nicholas Fondacro noted in a separate Monday evening post, Capitol Police arrested a man who threatened to kill Paul and “chop up” his family with an ax. Paul has now had three serious threats against his life in just over a year. Media coverage has all too often come off as indifferent and even dismissive, especially concerning the November assault.



ABC, CBS, and NBC completely ignored the horrific death threat issued to Republican Senator Rand Paul (KY) and his family during their evening broadcasts on Monday, even as the liberal media continue to pontificate about President Trump's supposed incitement of incivility across the country. Meanwhile, the same networks found ample time to discuss news of anti-Trump NBA star LeBron James moving to the L.A. Lakers.



Tuesday at the Louisville Courier Journal, part of Gannett's USA Today network, two reporters claimed that whoever vandalized a prominent billboard in that city to read "Kill the NRA" had "called out" the gun-rights group. David Harten and Darcy Costello never described the billboard as what it was while it was briefly visible: a violent threat.



A tale of two speeches: On Thursday, the New York Times Sheryl Gay Stolberg celebrated House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi’s marathon speech, “8 Hours, 7 Minutes and 1 Pelosi Soliloquy.” While not wholly laudatory, Stolberg fawned over Pelosi’s "heart-rending" defense of the so-called Dreamers. Sen. Rand Paul also delivered a delaying tactic of a speech, but Rand isn't nearly so highly regarded at the Times, accused of "bemoaning" and "sloganeering."



The Department of Justice announced Friday that Rene Boucher, the person who attacked and seriously injured Kentucky GOP Senator Rand Paul 2-1/2 months ago, has been charged with a federal felony and admitted to the attack. Several press accounts are crowing that the DOJ's announcement proves that the attack was not politically motivated. It does no such thing.



Senator Rand Paul’s family and friends have not been happy without how the media have characterized the unsolicited attack he faced from a neighbor earlier this month, that left him badly injured with six broken ribs, among other injuries.



On Tuesday’s Tucker Carlson Tonight, fill-in host Mark Steyn and The Hill’s Joe Concha enjoyed themselves at the expense of the latest liberal media diatribes, showcasing new cases of the incurably stupid Trump Derangement Syndrome involving everything from the death of Charles Manson to the attack on Republican Senator Rand Paul (Ky.).



At The New Yorker on Tuesday, Jeffrey Frank reached what one hopes is the worst we'll see of Trump Derangement Syndrome — but don't get your hopes up. Frank, in attempting to analyze what might have caused registered Democrat Rene Boucher to attack Senator Rand Paul two weeks ago, blamed "the sinister banality of American life ... with a lot of it these days emanating from Donald J. Trump." 



On Thursday afternoon, news broke that Republican Senator Rand Paul's office had disputed claims aired in the media that the Kentucky Senator had been in an ongoing dispute with his neighbor, Rene Boucher, before being tackled in his yard about a week ago, calling the accounts "fake news," and claiming that the two had not even spoken to each other in many years. 



Many of Kentucky Senator Rand Paul's neighbors are hotly disputing Louisville Courier Journal and New York Times reports which characterized the Friday assault on the Republican Senator as being the result of "petty arguments over misplaced lawn trimmings and branches" and "a landscaping dispute," respectively. Among their objections: The  Courier Journal's Thomas Novelly described the attack, during which Rene Boucher allegedly blindsided Paul and, per the Senator's most recent tweet, left him with six broken ribs and a "pleural effusion" as a "fight," while the opening sentence at the Times story authored by three reporters described it as an "altercation."



A Louisville Courier Journal item currently carried at USA Today by reporter Thomas Novelly seems to imply that Rand Paul deserved to be blindsided, tackled and to have possibly life-threatening serious injuries inflicted on him Friday afternoon. After all, the headline reads: "Rand Paul is not a perfect neighbor" — according to the developer of the gated community in which Paul and Rene Boucher, the alleged perpetrator, both live.