Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) has had a smorgasbord of problems to deal with in the last few months, including death threats. Now, big-name liberals from mega-donors to media elites and Hollywood circles are trying to oust him from office by packing his primary challenger with campaign cash.



Billionaire businessman Tom Steyer claims he wants to be president. This means if he gets his wish, he will face strong congressional opposition for many of his policy proposals and conniving foreign adversaries. Accordingly  his Monday appearance on MSNBC Live gave host Stephanie Ruhle the opportunity to ask Steyer how he would handle some of these challenges. Instead, Ruhle encouraged Steyer to take a victory lap on impeachment and to espouse their mutual dislike of Mitch McConnell and President Trump's tax policy.

 


Graham Piro at the Washington Free Beacon found a fascinating nugget in the waning minutes of an hourlong Monday segmentt of the NPR talk show 1A. Host Joshua Johnson was speaking about how many Democratic voters strongly -- we might say creepily -- hope to see their opponents die off so the Left can get what they want.



Self-described "conservative" Joe Scarborough frets that if President Trump and Mitch McConnell are successful, they will "shape the judiciary for the next 50 years." Scarborough expressed his concern in the context of criticizing Joe Kennedy for launching a Democrat primary campaign against incumbent Sen. Ed Markey in Massachusetts.  Scarborough worries that money spent on that campaign will divert funds that could be used to defeat President Trump.



After CNN chief White House correspondent Jim Acosta and American Urban Radio Networks correspondent/CNN political analyst April Ryan, the bronze medalist in carnival barking would have to be fellow CNN political analyst, Playboy correspondent, and Sentinel Newspapers editor Brian Karem. Karem had his press pass suspended on August 2 a la Acosta did last year and, like in that case, the White House was on the losing end as, on September 3 a federal judge demanded that Karem have his pass restored.



On Tuesday's CNN Newsroom, host Brooke Baldwin seized on a group of gun control activists who delivered a letter to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell as a stunt to push for more gun laws as she gave two members of the group a forum to promote their views as guests.



On Monday afternoon, Andrea Mitchell used her MSNBC show to give gun control activist Fred Guttenberg an unchallenged forum to bash Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and advocate for universal background checks. Mitchell went along with him by citing misleading polls alleging near unanimous support for such reforms by the public.



MSNBC Live host Stephanie Ruhle on Wednesday welcomed New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand for a softball interview to remind America that she is running for president and to allow her some free air time to accuse the National Rifle Association of not caring about dead children and for the host to praise Gilibrand's ability to distance herself from the NRA.



A draft of an executive order to be released by the White House found that at least 15,000 people had been affected by political censorship online. CNN reported that a summary of the draft stated that the White House “has received more than 15,000 anecdotal complaints of social media platforms censoring American political discourse.”



Twitter’s initial decision to suspend the official campaign account of Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) caused a massive boycott of the site’s advertising platform from the GOP. After the senator told a radio station that the GOP was “in a major war with [Twitter],” the company backed down and restored Team Mitch’s account.



The exploitation of mass shootings on the part of leftist late-night hosts in order to further their gun grabbing agenda has unfortunately become common practice in the aftermath of a tragedy. Thursday’s The Daily Show with Trevor Noah used an unusual, gauche tactic to push for their gun control demands.



Twitter’s war against conservatives and Republicans has some collateral damage — the company’s advertising business. Twitter blocked the campaign account for Senator Mitch McConnell (R-KY) account from posting on August 7. The platform claimed that in posting a video showing the violent threats aimed at McConnell, Team Mitch violated Twitter policy on violence and harassment. Republicans did the only thing left to do: they stopped spending money on Twitter ads until further notice.