While pundits start to evaluate how Donald Trump and Mike Pence performed on 60 Minutes over the weekend, let’s focus on how Lesley Stahl did. As one might expect, it was a lively debate (with all kinds of interruptions), and not a softball interview. That’s quite a contrast with how the same Lesley Stahl interviewed the Democratic ticket of John Kerry and John Edwards in 2004, and then brought in their wives for more soft soap. The major topics were their "energy" on the campaign trail and how they were singing songs.


Seeking to hook his readers early in his piece, "The Magic of New York Hotel Bars," Newsweek senior writer Alexander Nazaryan opened his July 15 feature by noting the genesis of the John Edwards-Rielle Hunter affair was in one such bar. 


Funny how it wasn't considered racist when liberals were demanding to "take back our country" during the Bush 43's stint in the White House.

A single presidency later, the term is unabashed dog-whistle racism, at least according to those who were so inclined to spout it in the past. As ever, it's only racist when conservatives say it. Liberals, as shown by their ardent devotion to the incumbent, cannot possibly be racist. It's simply unthinkable, if only to them. (Audio clips after the jump)


Hardball host Chris Matthews made some bizarre comments about the potential Republican candidates for president in 2016 on Tuesday night. 

Speaking to Jeanne Cummings of Bloomberg News and Republican strategist John Feehery, Matthews took a swipe at Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) and suggested “he's the Republicans' John Edwards.” [See video below.]


Trucking and Auto Accidents? Better Call John.
Drowning Accidents? Better Call John.
Defective or Unsafe Products? Better Call John.
Why? Because we at Edwards Kirby have a record of fighting for fairness and accountability.

Washington Examiner correspondent Byron York has written about John Edwards, the 2004 Democrat vice presidential nominee who came within just a few electoral votes away from being a heartbeat away from the presidency, returning to the love of his life, ambulance chasing. What is amusing is how tackily similar the Edwards' personal injury law firm, Edwards Kirby, is to the fictional Saul Goodman of the popular "Breaking Bad" television show. The blatant pitches for clients of both the Edwards Kirby and  the Saul Goodman websites appear to be almost the same. All that's lacking in the former are the garish yellow and red colors of the latter.


ABC News completely ignored the Monday death of heiress Rachel "Bunny" Mellon, who used her wealth to help conceal the mistress of former Democratic presidential candidate John Edwards. CBS and NBC both noted the passing of the 103-year-old and her connection to Edwards, but failed identify Edwards as a Democrat. [Listen to the audio or watch the video after the jump]

On Tuesday's CBS This Morning, co-host Norah O'Donnell touted how Mellon "was a horticulturist who redesigned the White House Rose Garden at Jackie Kennedy's invitation." However, when it came to her involvement with Edwards, O'Donnell only vaguely mentioned: "In later years, she gave money to help presidential candidate John Edwards."


The New York Times went into Democratic Rehab mode on Tuesday on the front page of the Business Day section: “John Edwards Revisits His Past, Hanging Out Law Shingle Again.”

Peter Lattman and Kim Severson
waited until paragraph 27 to wonder if someone with Edwards’ talent for lying about adultery to a dying wife might impede his appeal to clients. First, we must hear of “poor Edwards” having to deal with cynics and naysayers:


On Monday's Morning Edition on NPR, Cokie Roberts did little to hide her feelings about the Republican National Committee's recent decision to exclude NBC and CNN from hosting future debates between would-be GOP presidential candidates. Roberts asserted that "some might think it's a little bit childish."

Roberts also brushed off the impact of the RNC's move, stating that it's "not likely to play much one way or the other" with voters.


On Wednesday's edition of The Stephanie Miller show on "progressive" radio and Current TV, Miller and her impressionist sidekick Jim Ward expressed "how frustrating the mainstream media can be" for treating the John Edwards mistress-payments trial as a serious, newsworthy matter instead of just  dismissing the whole thing as a "lousy case."

But then it got funnier when they said the media failed on the Edwards trial because, as Ward said, "They're afraid of Fox News." Yes, we're sure the liberal media were shaking in their fancy boots:


The weekday edition of CBS Evening News with anchor Scott Pelley bizarrely paid no attention to the campaign finance trial of 2004 Democratic vice presidential candidate John Edwards until the jury declared a mistrial on all but one count on May 31, 2012. By contrast, the evening news program devoted a full report to the first day of the trial of former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky on Monday.

Pelley's omission also stands out on his own network. CBS This Morning aired multiple segments on the Edwards case between April 23, the first day of the trial, and June 1, 2012, when the morning show aired a full report from correspondent Ann Werner, along with a discussion segment with Erin Moriarty of 48 Hours.


It’s amazing that CNN put out a press release last October touting “Democratic strategist Maria Cardona and conservative columnist David Frum have joined the network for the 2012 election season.” (Italics mine.) David Frum is not a conservative. Look no further than his latest CNN opinion piece, “Bloomberg’s Visionary Plan Against Obesity.”

“Some object that the mayor's proposal to restrict serving sizes will restrict liberty. But the liberty restricted is not the liberty of the soda-drinker. If they wish, soda drinkers can buy a 2-liter bottle of soda at the grocery for about $1.70 and pour as much of it down their throats as they wish,” he snobbishly wrote.”The liberty that is being restricted is the liberty of the soda seller to manipulate known human weaknesses to the seller's advantage and the buyer's detriment.” (Italics his.)