The Democratic National Convention would not be complete without a group of liberal Hollywood celebrities anxiously warning that humans are threatening the planet. Avatar director and eco-hypocrite James Cameron premiered his short environmental film, Not Reality TV, at the convention. In addition to blaming floods, droughts, fires, and other natural disasters on human-induced global warming, the film also criticized Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump for calling global warming a “hoax.”



The environmental group WildAid claims livestock is a main cause of greenhouse gas emissions so it is targeting China, calling on people to reduce their carbon footprints by rejecting meat. They’ve recruited some star power to push their liberal agenda. But those stars are wealthy, elite eco-hypocrites.

 



Filmmaker and liberal activist James Cameron appeared on MSNBC, Tuesday, to “bemoan” the climate “denialists” on “the right” who won’t face up to the “biggest crisis” for Earth. Talking to Chris Hayes, the director lamented, “I felt hopeless for a long time watching a government that's paralyzed by denialism on the right, about what I think of as the biggest crisis that our society and our global civilization faces.”  



Journalists help promote Hollywood celebrities while condemning average Americans for causing climate change. The same media go out of their way to ignore or excuse the hypocrisy of celebrity “environmentalists” who fly their private jets around the world, rent mega-yachts and live in massive mansions.

Avatar Director James Cameron warned of a future “world that’s in shambles” because of climate change, and said he believes “in ecoterrorism” yet, he owns an impressive private collection of motorcycles, cars, dirt bikes, a yacht, a helicopter, a Humvee fire truck and a $32-million submarine. ABC and CBS even praised Cameron for his submarine purchase, with CBS’s Gayle King saying she loved his “passion and curiosity.”



They may be good at making movies, but Hollywood celebrities’ lifestyles are far from an environmentalist’s dream. Their globetrotting, multiple mansion owning ways are inconsistent with the environmental agenda they loudly promote.

Showtime’s new climate change series, “Years of Living Dangerously,” premiered April 13, 2014, slightly more than a week before Earth Day 2014. It relies on several wealthy, Hollywood celebrities to spread fear about climate change. While these actors and directors talk a lot about reducing carbon footprints and saving the world, they haven’t given up their own enormous mansions and private jets.



Masquerading as a scientific documentary, Showtime’s new climate change series is actually just more alarmist propaganda.

The first episode of “Years of Living Dangerously,” actually gave precious little time to discussing scientific data of climate. Ninety-five percent of the show wasn’t about actual climate science (a mere 3 minutes 5 seconds of the 57 minute 10 second program discussed climate data). Although the word science got bandied about frequently.

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There’s a certain delicious irony in the global warming industry – the one that’s always screaming about climate change “deniers” not “believing in science” – trying to make a religious appeal to Christians.

The Huffington Post on April 5 published “Climate Change Threats To ‘The Least of These’ Compel Evangelical Christians to Act,” in which writer Lynne Peeples interviewed Katharine Hayhoe, a “leading climate scientist,.” Hayhoe will be featured in the first episode of a new Showtime series directed by James Cameron called “Years of Living Dangerously.” The celebrity-studded documentary series will address “the entanglement of politics, faith and science that impedes acceptance and action on climate change.” Basically, it’s a bunch of left-wing secularists blaming religion for mucking up the climate change movement.



Liberal filmmaker James Cameron is estimated to be worth $700 million.

Despite this fortune, it was announced Monday that he will be producing the next three installments of his successful "Avatar" movie in New Zealand.

It was also announced Monday that New Zealand is changing its tax incentive structure for films made in the country making Cameron eligible for 25 percent in rebates.



Showtime announced last year that it had commissioned Oscar-winning filmmaker James Cameron to produce an eight-part series for the network designed to scare the public into thinking the world is doomed as a result of global warming.

Coincidentally on Halloween, the cable network released a trailer for the April 2014 series entitled Years of Living Dangerously and credits that identify key Hollywood contributors such as Jessica Alba, Matt Damon, Harrison Ford, and Arnold Schwarzenegger (video follows with commentary):



E-mail messages obtained by NewsBusters refute claims that multi-millionaire filmmaker James Cameron cancelled a debate with prominent global warming skeptics because they weren't as famous as he is.

As NewsBusters reported Monday, a debate had been scheduled and placed on the program for last weekend's AREDay summit in Aspen, Colorado, featuring internet publisher Andrew Breitbart, Sen. James Inhofe's (R-Okla.) former communications director Marc Morano, and documentarian Ann McElhinney. 

Within the past 36 hours, event organizers have absurdly claimed that since Cameron wanted to match wits with either Glenn Beck, Sarah Palin, or Inhofe, he decided to pull out of the debate when this didn't happen.

E-mail messages between the prospective participants and Cameron's representative paint an entirely different picture. 

To begin our story, Richard Greene, the man that negotiated the particulars with the skeptics, sent the following regrets to the prospective participants some time Saturday (h/t Big Hollywood):



Multi-millionaire filmmaker James Cameron on Sunday backed out of a global warming debate that he asked for and organized.

For those that haven't been following the recent goings on concerning Nobel Laureate Al Gore's favorite money-making myth, an environmental summit was held this weekend in Aspen, Colorado, called AREDAY, which is short for American Renewable Energy Day.

Ahead of this conference, Cameron challenged three noted global warming skeptics to a public debate where he was going to personally "call those deniers out into the street at high noon and shoot it out with those boneheads."

One of the invited skeptics, Ann McElhinney of NotEvilJustWrong.com, wrote about Cameron's surprise cancellation Sunday:



Fox News Channel's Craig Rivera, on Sunday's Geraldo At Large, in a shipboard interview from the Gulf of Mexico, actually asked a conservationist if the oil spill there was a real world equivalent of the fictional disaster seen in the recent James Cameron blockbuster as he pressed: "Do you see what's happening in the oil industry and offshore drilling comparable or some kind of parallel to, like, the movie Avatar?"

After Steiner theorized: "It certainly could be," Rivera then made the following hard transition to an interview with Avatar star Sigourney Weaver: "Although the fight Sigourney Weaver and director James Cameron are waging to protect the rights of the indigenous people of the Amazon from a huge hydroelectric plant is a world away from the situation in the gulf oil spill, the principle is the same - protecting the planet from those interested in only quick profits." Rivera then aired a clip of Weaver boasting that Avatar showed the world "how concerned people are about our planet." [video below the fold]

The following is an excerpt from the Craig Rivera piece as it was aired on the May 9 edition of Geraldo At Large: