It’s no secret that Democrats are very disappointed that the Mueller Report did not give them the smoking gun that would finally end the Trump presidency. Instead, they have been forced to expand their search in the continuing efforts to remove the President from office.  



On Monday night's Amanpour & Co. on PBS, former Time Managing Editor Walter Isaacson interviewed Alec Baldwin about, among other things, his Donald Trump impression on Saturday Night Live. Baldwin admitted he didn't understand Trump, and that his impression is a "caricature....we're doing like an essence of Trump. His corrupt, amoral, Machiavellian nature is at the fore." Then he said he was distraught that being president didn't change Trump at all. 



This week, NewsBusters is recounting the most obnoxious liberal bias of 2018. Today, it’s a look at the media’s Trump Derangement Syndrome as we present the most over-the-top attacks on President Donald Trump. When he wasn’t being compared to tyrants like Benito Mussolini, he was being branded a traitor who sold out America to Vladimir Putin. And of course he was repeatedly tarred as a hateful racist. 



On Monday, Tulane history Professor Walter Isaacson took to the airwaves of MSNBC's Morning Joe to condemn President Trump. The swipe began by Isaacson making the bold declaration that Donald Trump was "a weaponized virus" and that he's been "weaponized over the years by Vladimir Putin to go in and do Putin's bidding."



It’s certainly no surprise that Sean Hannity disagrees with many of the comments made by Mika Brzezinski of MSNBC. However, the prime-time Fox News Channel host went far further than that during his Thursday program, when he criticized the co-host of Morning Joe for claiming President Trump is “upset” that he can’t access pornography in the White House.



Former Trump campaign correspondent and current MSNBC host Katy Tur appeared on Thursday’s The 11th Hour to argue that President Trump won’t suffer “the consequences” of his actions (e.g. his lewd Mika Brzezinski tweets) until Republicans oppose him on policy (and thus team up with Democrats).



Yes, it’s as bad as you think it was. On Wednesday, MSNBC’s Hardball host Chris Matthews allowed himself to have his knees quake one last time, paying tribute to President Obama, who he deemed “a fine man” offering unparalleled levels of “sentiment,” “temperament,” and “optimism.” “To say that no person can make a difference, I give you the fine case of that fine man, Barack Obama,” Matthews swooned at the end.



Here at NewsBusters, one of our classification categories under Media Bias is "Sudden Respect." The notion is that all a Republican has to do to win praise from the MSM is to bash fellow Republicans or conservatives.

There was a perfect illustration of the phenomenon on today's Morning Joe.  In her Republican response to the SOTU, South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley counseled Republicans to reject "the siren call of the angriest voices" and urged "welcoming immigrants regardless of race or religion." The shots at Donald Trump and to some extent at Ted Cruz were unmistakeable. Morning Joe loved it. "Welcome to the big stage," enthused Mika Brzezinski.  Willie Geist declared Haley a "star." Gushed former CNN CEO Walter Isaacson: "great."



Ex-Time magazine editor Walter Isaacson declared in the August 25 issue that Barack Obama "can still secure his legacy" by aggressively lobbying for liberal causes. Isaacson worried, "Obamacare may be undermined if the Supreme Court guts subsidies for the federal exchanges. If so the sweeping nature of the reform will survive only if Obama mounts a rousing, state-by-state campaign to rally passion for protecting the new health benefits." 

The Time editor cheered, "President Obama has scored two monumental achievements: helping to restore the financial system after the 2008 collapse and making it possible for every American to get health care coverage, even if they leave their jobs or have preexisting conditions." Isaacson's real complaints with Obama seem to be not fighting hard enough for liberalism.



The Huffington Post has gotten a copy of the soon to be released biography of Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, and there are some snippets that are destined to anger Obama-loving media members across the fruited plain.

According to author Walter Isaacson, Jobs told the President in the fall of 2010, "You're headed for a one-term presidency":



Throughout the history of this country playing the role of a global power, the United States has faced down threats of fascism and communism. The country is now in the throes of a war against terrorism.

However, on ABC's Nov. 22 "This Week with George Stephanopoulos," a panel consisting of Washington Post columnist George Will, Liz Cheney of Keep America Safe, University of California, Berkeley professor Robert Reich and Walter Isaacson is the President and CEO of The Aspen Institute, warned the next ideological battle facing the country is that which China practices - an authoritarian market society or authoritarian capitalism.

"For 37 years, every administration has bet, since Nixon went to China, on a theory, and the theory was that capitalism, market economy, which requires a judicial system to enforce promises, which are called contracts, needs a vast dissemination of information and decision-making that capitalism by its mores and working would subvert the regime, that you could not have an authoritarian market society," Will said. "It's the Starbucks fallacy. It turns out to be a fallacy, that if the Chinese have a choice of coffees, they'll want a -- they'll demand a choice of political candidates. We may be wrong. It could be you can have an authoritarian system."



Reading Bob Novak's new book about his years as a Washington reporter, I came across his recollection about how back in 1980, when marginal income tax rates stood at 70 percent, political reporters considered it bizarre that then-candidate Ronald Reagan supported the Kemp-Roth plan to reduce income taxes by 30 percent. On page 357 of 'The Prince of Darkness: 50 Years Reporting in Washington' (Amazon's page), Novak related a conversation he had, the week before the 1980 election, with Walter Isaacson, then a new Time magazine reporter. Isaacson eventually moved up the ranks to run the magazine and later CNN:
The connection of Reagan's emphasis on tax reduction to his late [1980] campaign surge was lost on reporters covering the Republican candidate. One of them was Walter Isaacson, a twenty-eight-year-old Time correspondent. The former Rhodes scholar, in his second year with the magazine, was given the plum assignment of covering Reagan. On the campaign trail that last week, he introduced himself to me and started a conversation about Reagan's and my tax-cutting views. He said he believed I was the only journalist he knew who actually supported Kemp-Roth, which accurately reflected the political press corps' mind-set. “I just wonder if you could explain to me how you got there,” he said. Walter sounded like a modern scientist encountering somebody who believed the earth was flat.