NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson touts she's had "34 great years at NPR," so it's not surprising she's going to offer the dependable liberal hot take on President Trump's newest scandal. Trump accusing Biden of impropriety involving his son's Ukrainian business dealings? She broke out the B-word, "birtherism." 



Following Wednesday’s White House press briefing, White House correspondents from ABC and CNN expressed their pathetic bitterness and sense of entitlement, whining the press secretary Sean Spicer didn’t call on them or some of their friends in the liberal media. 



“It's important to say right up front that this isn't a story about pedophile priests,” began the NPR reporter on Wednesday night....in a story with the online headline “Catholic Church Groups Fight Bills To Revive Old Sex Abuse Cases.”

Some legislators want to put in a "grace period" for new sex-abuse lawsuits outside the statute of limitations. The people who call their show All Things Considered didn’t consider this: Can we open the statute of limitations on rape allegations for Juanita Broaddrick to sue Bill Clinton? Would that seem fair?



Tony Perkins, president of the Family Research Council, appeared in live PBS/NPR convention coverage on Wednesday night and walked into a barrage of liberal questions designed to shame him and separate him from Donald Trump, who they implied was a terrible Christian. “Conservative” PBS David Brooks not only suggested Trump has no Christian virtues, he told Perkins that social conservatives should sit out the election – obviously making it easier to elect Hillary Clinton.



PBS covered the Republican convention for three hours of prime time on Monday night, in association with its pubcasting buddies at NPR. But they were allergic to showing any Hillary-scandal films that were offered on the convention floor. As a mini-documentary ran about Benghazi, PBS anchors Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff clumsily talked over it, and NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson had a wide-eyed freakout at what she claimed was a historically “intense animus” against an opposing candidate.



The “All-Star Panel” during FNC’s Special Report always can be counted on to contribute outstanding opinions and Wednesday was no different as they slammed a New York Times editorial blaming not radical Islam but Republicans for Orlando that National Review’s Jonah Goldberg dubbed perhaps “the single dumbest editorial in the history of The New York Times.”



NPR's Mara Liasson went after ABC News on Fox News Channel's Special Report on Friday over their decision to not invite Carly Fiorina to their upcoming Republican presidential debate: "It's inexplicable. I don't know how they can stand up and explain why the only woman in the race — who placed above some of the people who are on the stage and has a delegate — is not there. I can't even imagine...what the explanation would be."



During the first “All-Star Panel” segment on Tuesday’s Special Report, Fox News Channel (FNC) contributor Charles Krauthammer offered blistering criticisms of Senate Democrats for their support of the Iran deal along with Senate Republicans for not invoking the nuclear option by introducing a resolution disapproving of the deal. 



The Thursday panel on Fox News Channel’s Special Report with Bret Baier took on the issue of the Obama administration’s so-called policy in addressing ISIS and blasted the President for maintaining that the U.S. and its allies are not losing the fight against the Islamic extremist group despite the seizures this week of Ramadi in Iraq and Palmyra in Syria. Leading the way was FNC contributor Charles Krauthammer, who asserted that “[t]he administration is sounding like Baghdad Bob during the invasion of Iraq” and that “[t]hey're losing” which “[e]verybody understands.”



The nation’s leading newspapers couldn’t be bothered with the controversy over Team Obama's no-show at the huge Paris "unity" rally on Monday morning, and then buried it on Tuesday. The Washington Post and The New York Times noticed France didn't seem to care.

NPR reporter Mara Liasson arrived on the story, but underlined "it's probably not that big a deal."



NPR celebrates political anniversaries – when it likes them. They celebrated the one-year anniversary of Occupy Wall Street, when when it had already faded away. This week, NPR aired five stories discussing the fourth anniversary of Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move” initiative to get kids to eat better and exercise.

But there was no story on the fifth anniversary of the Tea Party. The closest thing was a Mara Liasson analysis on Thursday of how the Senate races look tough for Democrats this fall – if the Republicans can keep the Tea Party extremists at bay:



Last week, I wrote up how The New York Times wrote a demonizing obituary about Harold Simmons, a major MRC donor. NPR’s Peter Overby slimed him after he died as some sort of pioneer of negative advertising.  His obituary highlighted how he “backed Swift Boat ads.” I discovered another obvious contrast in obituaries when I came across this piece on Peter Lewis in The Washington Post from November 26:

“Peter Lewis, the longtime head of Progressive Corp., died Saturday at age 80,” wrote Sean Sullivan. “In the business world, Lewis will be remembered for growing a modest automobile insurance company into one of the nation's biggest operations. In the political realm, he'll be remembered for being one of the biggest liberal mega-donors in history.”