In May 2017, Robert Mueller was appointed special counsel to look into issues around possible Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, which the media and Democrats quickly boiled down to a single word, “Collusion,” a vague charge which Donald Trump nonetheless was almost surely guilty of when it came to Russia. Twenty-two months later, the report has been issued and been summarized by Attorney General Bob Barr. Mueller and his team issued no indictments against Donald Trump or anyone in the Trump administration. To mark the end, here’s an extremely incomplete list of occasions Times reporters, editorialists and columnists freely tossing around the accusation of “collusion."



The front of Wednesday’s New York Times declared all was well on the Southern border, no matter what President Trump or his alarmed supporters may say: “No Crisis Here, Say Neighbors Close to Mexico -- Citing Other Problems ‘That Need Fixing.’” The reporting team found nothing but “tranquility” all along the border. The jump-page headline: “No Immigration Crisis Here, Tranquil Town Along Southern Border Says.” Even as the television networks reluctantly aired a few concerns about border security, the tone of the Times story was utterly dismissive of border security concerns.



New York Times reporter Julie Hirschfeld Davis delivered a not-particularly friendly farewell to House Speaker and former vice-presidential candidate Paul Ryan of Wisconsin on Thursday. The story is notable for ideological labeling that’s severely slanted even for a Times story, with the prefix “ultra” dropped on Republicans no less than three times in this one report.



With elections fast approaching, Friday’s New York Times was packed with accusations of President Trump as a racist and hostile to immigrants, most intensely in the lead story by Michael Shear and Julie Hirschfeld Davis. The headline deck: “Trump Invoking ‘Crisis’ at Border As Voting Nears – Message For Midterms – A Presidential Theme Is Built Around a Fear of Immigrants.” Illegal immigrants, actually, but don’t count on the Times to ever clarify.



The New York Times reported from Omaha on Saturday: “Trump Seizes On Migrant Caravan to Rev Up Republican Voters.” "Barely two weeks away from an election that threatens to sweep Republicans from power in the House of Representatives and dash any lingering hope of conservative immigration reform, the party, led by President Trump, is leaning more aggressively into dark portrayals of undocumented immigrants in a bid to galvanize voters. Mr. Trump, whose political appeal among his core voters has largely been rooted in warnings about illegal immigration as a threat to American security, sovereignty and identity, has stepped up his hard-line, inflammatory attacks on Latin American migrants...."



As congressional elections loom, New York Times reporter Julie Hirschfeld Davis revealed Monday that “Republicans Find an Unexpectedly Potent Line of Attack: Immigration.” (Unexpected to the Times, at least.) The text box: “Heart-rending images are countered with fear-laden appeals.” Davis’s Monday story tilted the playing field with tone and labeling choices: "But Republican candidates across the country, leaning on the scorched-earth campaign playbook employed by President Trump, saw an opening nonetheless, painting Democrats as the ones pursuing an extreme immigration agenda that would fill the country with “sanctuary cities” where violent criminals roam free."



The New York Times gave vastly different views of Brett Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford regarding their extraordinary testimony, consistently chiding Kavanaugh as "angry" and "aggrieved" and calling his judicial temperament into question -- as if anger wouldn't be a perfectly reasonable response to false allegations of sexual assault. The paper was clearly disappointed with Sen. Lindsey Graham for his fierce attacks on Democrats.



Tuesday’s New York Times led with Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Maggie Haberman rushing to tar President Trump’s criticism of the “deep state” and the mainstream press as corrosive, paranoid, and conspiratorial (while unwittingly strengthening his case) in “Trump’s Embrace Of ‘Spygate” Plot Sows Suspicions -- Eroding Public Trust -- Conspiracy Theories Are Brought From Fringes to the Oval Office.” The text box didn’t offer much benefit of the doubt: “Ex-aides cite political opportunism and the president’s paranoia.”



Tuesday evening (for Wednesday's print edition), New York Times reporter Julie Hirschfeld Davis, covering President Donald Trump's rally in Nashville, Tennessee, reported that it attracted "about 1,000" attendees. The Times issued a correction on Wednesday, stating that "the fire marshal’s office estimated that approximately 5,500 people attended the rally." So the crowd was 5-1/2 times larger than originally reported. How can that happen?



Following the rest of the press, New York Times reporter Julie Hirschfeld Davis falsely portrayed the president as attacking all “undocumented immigrants” (in the paper’s politically correct terminology) as “animals” when he was clearly only talking about criminal gangs, including the murderous MS-13. The story came out of a White House meeting between President Trump and California mayors and sheriffs who oppose the state’s policy of “sanctuary cities” to protect illegal immigrants: “Trump Rants on Unauthorized Migrants: ‘These Aren’t People, These Are Animals.”



CNN set a possible new low for themselves Sunday morning when their Inside Politics panel of liberal journalists obnoxiously complained that Vice President Mike Pence didn’t shake the hand of Kim Yo-jong, Kim Jong-un’s sister and the head of the Propaganda and Agitation Department. “South Korea views this as a major milestone and a chance, a chance to see if an Olympics detente can bring a broader diplomatic opening, but the Vice President sees it as propaganda period,” bemoaned host, John King.



The New York Times may be at its most liberal on the immigration issue, and when President Trump seemed to warm to the idea of a path to citizenship for some illegals, reporters abruptly warmed to him, at least compared to the “hard-line anti-immigration activists” in his party. The lead story by Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Sheryl Gay Stolberg, “Trump Receptive To Working Out Citizenship Path," tempted Trump with chances of political victory, and provided the paper's usual “undocumented” euphemism for illegal immigrants.