Published on Wednesday, the latest edition of National Review Online’s The Jamie Weinstein Show podcast featured a lively, hour-plus conversation with CNN’s Reliable Sources host Brian Stelter. The full podcast is highly recommended as Stelter delved into his upbringing and his (sadly, wrong) views about media bias in addition so solid, universal career advice.



In a podcast posted on Monday, CNN's Don Lemon told National Review's Jamie Weinstein that some pro-Trump panelists on his show have admitted that, in Weinstein's words, "they don't believe what they are saying" — as if knee-jerk leftists never engage in such disingenuous behavior (sure, Don). Lemon apparently has no problem allowing people who have allegedly admitted to this behavior to continue serving as panelists. Lemon's statement is a de facto admission that he and his network are willing to broadcast fake opinions.



CNN anchor Jake Tapper went on Hugh Hewitt’s radio show Tuesday, and naturally the 2016 presidential race came up as a discussion topic. Referring to the battle for the Republican nomination, Tapper proclaimed, “[I]t is a wide-open field, and there is no one, literally no one I would discount.”

The veteran political journalist then rattled off a few GOP hopefuls he would not discount – Gov. Rick Perry, Sen. Rand Paul, Sen. Rob Portman. He wouldn’t even discount New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, in spite of the current bridge controversy. But then Hewitt’s co-host, Jamie Weinstein of The Daily Caller, asked, “What about Joe Scarborough 2016?” [YouTube video embedded below the break.]



What was the best way for NBC to begin that network's coverage of the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia? Have sports anchor Bob Costas host a brief profile on Vladmir Putin in which the Russian president is hailed as a global statesman superior to U.S. president Barack Obama. '

During a video portion of the profile, Costas said that Putin is an accomplished peacemaker, crediting him with preventing an American airstrike on Syria and coaxing the Iranian government to the nuclear negotiating table.



Yesterday, the editorial board at the New York Times published an editorial harshly criticizing President Obama and his administration for continuing to collect the phone records of millions of Verizon customers. Presumably, the board obtained word-for-word consensus before hitting the "Enter" key on this crucial sentence in the editorial's second paragraph: "The Obama administration has lost all credibility."

Mere hours after its initial publication, Jamie Weinstein at the Daily Caller notes, the editorial ("President Obama's Dragnet") was revised. Yours truly has the graphic grabs of the most crucial changes after the jump.