MSNBC juggled two priorities during its Super Tuesday 2 coverage with the first being continuing to boost and rehabilitate the image of Joe Biden as he stands to be the 2020 Democratic nominee. But the other and, for the focus of purposes here, was continuing to paint the Trump administration’s response to coronavirus as disastrous and rendering Trump the 21st century incarnation of Jimmy Carter and an “underground railroad” for real information about the virus.



Super Tuesday 2 marked a further coronation of Joe Biden by the liberal media and a pivot away from any and all critical coverage of the gaffe-ridden candidate. MSNBC did its part, marveling at Biden putting “not just the South in play, but the Sun Belt” as well thanks to his “fascinating kinetic moment.” And then after Biden’s victory speech, one MSNBC pundit was there to swoon over his “very soft tone of voice as if you’re in the living room with him” and his use of the word “honor” that he would restore to the presidency.



Amidst the amusing shout-outs to Hardball host Chris Matthews on the 20th anniversary of the show being on MSNBC, Thursday’s show provided a potpourri of nonsense in the form of two takes. One take pertained to fears that the public impeachment hearings won’t go as well as the left hopes and then the other comparedformer Attorney General Jeff Sessions to the ugly, racist George Wallace. 



Appearing as a guest on Friday's All In show on MSNBC, former New York Times executive editor Howell Raines suggested that there is the "functional equivalent of treason" in the White House, and asserted that, unlike President Abraham Lincoln's Republican party, the modern GOP is "intent on tearing apart" the Union.



Late Tuesday night, longtime New York Times editor Howell Raines joined MSNBC’s The 11th Hour to gush over the “historic night” in his home state of Alabama and declare that Democrat Doug Jones’s victory put the state on “the indisputably right road” “for the first time in 175 years.”



Hootie Johnson, former chairman of the Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Ga., home of The Master’s Golf Tournament, died on Friday at age 86. The New York Times recognized him in an obituary by Richard Goldstein and could not resist getting in last swings at its unlikely foe. In 2002-03, Johnson was in the paper’s cross-hairs for refusing to admit women members to Augusta National. In a notorious editorial in November 2002, “America’s All-Male Golfing Society,” obsessive anti-Augusta crusader and Times executive editor Howell Raines even suggested Tiger Woods, then king of the golf world, boycott the tournament in solidarity. Raines targeted CBS as well, which had the broadcast rights to the tournament, and did multiple stories, many on the front page, keeping the pressure on CBS and Augusta National.



Ten years ago this week, Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans and it wasn’t long after the devastation that liberal reporters, hosts and columnists politicized the tragedy - from the left. Everything from George W. Bush’s “big oil” buddies to America’s racism to even tax cuts were blamed for the high human toll.



Howell Raines, the controversial former editor of the New York Times and self-described "liberal to radical," notorious for using his perch to crusade against the all-male policies of Augusta National Golf Club and Fox News, is back with some helpful advice for the "punitive" political party he loathes in a guest column for the paper's Sunday Review: "Anecdotal evidence indicates that affluent Southern Republicans continue to believe that minority voters can be attracted with punitive polices based on the Paul Ryan model....The region’s most affluent citizens always resist the obvious at first....In the ’60s Birmingham’s business leaders allowed George Wallace to run amok in their town. It will take awhile for Southern and national Republicans to understand that, as Mr. Frey put it, 'Demographics is destiny.'"



Former New York Times executive editor Howell Raines (sacked in the 2003 Jayson Blair debacle) provided a positive review Sunday of Washington Post political reporter Dan Balz’s 2012-campaign book “Collision.” Raines claimed Balz was “a fair-minded reporter” in the mold of the late David Broder.

You can’t say the same for Raines, who insists Mitt Romney is “excruciatingly delusional” in assessing what happened last year. Bill Clinton’s convention speech gets “deservedly heroic treatment” from Balz, but somehow, Raines saw Clint Eastwood’s erratic convention speech as a “Monty Python moment,” perhaps one of few times anyone’s ever tried to put Dirty Harry next to Eric Idle in the cultural realm:



Politico media reporter Dylan Byers stirred up media indignation with an unflattering article Tuesday on Jill Abramson, the New York Times executive editor, "Turbulence at the Times", based largely on anonymous Times sources who snipe that Abramson is detached, brusque, and a "very, very unpopular" presence in the newsroom.

One Monday morning in April, Jill Abramson called Dean Baquet into her office to complain. The executive editor of The New York Times was upset about the paper’s recent news coverage -- she felt it wasn’t “buzzy” enough, a source there said -- and placed blame on Baquet, her managing editor. A debate ensued, which gave way to an argument.



This week marks 10 years of Times Watch, the Media Research Center's project monitoring the liberal bias of the New York Times, America's most influential newspaper. Over the course of roughly 3,500 posts since March 2003, we have followed the Times through events historic (wars in Afghanistan and Iraq), pathetic (Jayson Blair, Howell Raines) and dangerous (the paper scuttling two separate anti-terror programs.) 

Here in rough chronological order are the Top Ten highlights of the New York Times' 10-year investigation into the bias of the New York Times.



Since September 2, NewsBusters has been showcasing the most egregious bias the Media Research Center has uncovered over the years — four quotes for each of the 25 years of the MRC, 100 quotes total — all leading up to our big 25th Anniversary Gala next week.

Click here for blog posts recounting the worst of 1988 through 2004. Today, the worst bias of 2005: NBC’s Brian Williams equates America’s Founding Fathers with the zealots running Iran; ex-New York Times editor Howell Raines goes on a post-Katrina rant about the human carnage caused by the Bush administration’s “churchgoing populism,” and Ted Turner tries to defend North Korean dictator Kim Jong-Il . [Quotes and video below the jump.]