The panel on Sunday’s edition of Kasie DC acted as Democratic strategists, giving House Democrats advice ahead of the public testimony of career diplomats as part of the impeachment inquiry. In addition, the panel predicted that former National Security Adviser John Bolton would emerge as a “star witness” for the Democrats if he decided to testify.



Not surprisingly, MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough found plenty to complain about in President Trump’s speech announcing the death of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. During Monday’s edition of Morning Joe, Scarborough complained about how "the President of the United States went on talking about how Baghdadi died like a ‘dog, a coward...whimpering and sniveling.’” According to Scarborough, President Trump’s word choice made him sound more like two late Middle Eastern dictators than the President of the United States.



Over the past couple of days, morning shows on both CNN and MSNBC have hyped alarmist predictions made by a United Nations panel about how global warming will impact the world over the next 100 years. On CNN's New Day, co-host Alisyn Camerota asked climate correspondent Bill Weir, "How do you get out of bed in the morning?" after he finished detailing the "dire" predictions.



Over the past several days, the networks have delivered the latest example of the dominant liberal media suddenly taking notice of a normal government activity done by the Donald Trump administration and treating it as outrageous even though there was no media scrutiny when the same activity was also done by the Barack Obama administration.



The "public charge" doctrine has been a foundation of American immigration policy going back hundreds of years to colonial times. The notion is that immigrants who are unable to support themselves, thus becoming public charges, should not be admitted or permitted to remain. In 1996, Congress enacted a federal immigration law codifying the public charge principle, and it has remained on the books in the same form ever since. So what do you call the Trump administration's plan to enforce that law? If you're a Trump-hating leftist like MSNBC contributor Fernand Amandi, it is nothing less than: "a white-supremacist, domestic-terror campaign targeting people of color."



MSNBC anchor and correspondent Ayman Mohyeldin joined MSNBC Live host Ali Velshi on Friday to chat about Israel's decision to  Congresswomen Rashida Tlaib and Ilhan Omar into the country and Tlaib turning down a humanitarian exception to visit her grandmother. Throughout the segment, Mohyeldin made multiple eyebrow-raising statements including calling Bernie Sanders a centrist on the issue and insisting that those who support the BDS movement simply have different tactics for achieving peace between the Israelis and the Palestinians. 



MSNBC anchor Ayman Mohyeldin's assertion that President Trump would prefer immigration from "Nordic countries" drew a pushback from NBC correspondent Kelly O'Donnell on Monday morning.



On Sunday, in the aftermath of revelations that the alleged hate crime attack against actor Jussie Smollett was probably a hoax orchestrated by Smollett himself, MSNBC contributor and former federal prosecutor Paul Butler was among those liberals apparently trying to cling to the possibility that the high-profile actor might be telling the truth because he "has not changed his story."



On Sunday's MSNBC Live, during a discussion of the Pittsburgh synagogue attack, host Ayman Mohyeldin repeatedly tried to get Israeli Ambassador to the U.S. Ron Dermer to criticize President Donald Trump for allegedly using "dog whistles" that might have encouraged more anti-Semitism. Dermer praised Trump, pointed out that anti-Semitism exists on both the far left and far right, and called out the media for mostly ignoring the recent anti-Semitism of Nation of Islam Leader Louis Farrakhan.



On Monday morning, several shows on CNN and MSNBC picked up on a United Nations report alleging that the world only has about 10 years to reduce carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere to stave off "dire" and "catastrophic" consequences of global warming.



During Thursday’s edition of The Beat With Ari Melber, guest host Ayman Mohyeldin interviewed Georgetown University Professor Michael Eric Dyson. The beginning of the interview focused on Florida Republican gubernatorial candidate Ron DeSantis, who has faced a media firestorm for saying that “we don’t need to monkey this up” by embracing socialism; referring to Florida’s economy and his opponent’s plans for it. DeSantis’s critics argued that the use of the word “monkey” was a racial slur directed at his African-American opponent, Andrew Gillum. One of his critics even argued that DeSantis should drop out of the race. Dyson’s reaction to DeSantis’s comments presented no exception the hysteria.



In the past couple of days since the passing of former Republican Senator John McCain, several personalities on both CNN and MSNBC have lamented his selection of Sarah Palin as his vice presidential nominee in 2008 as a "mistake," with some suggestions that he helped set up the Republican party to go down the wrong track by doing so.