When on Morning Joe, Donny Deutsch praised President Trump's restraint on Iran, Joe Scarborough interjected to clarify that Deutsch was only referring to Trump's restraint in regard to attacking Iran. Scarborough was concerned that Deutsch would get "killed" on Twitter if it were thought he was more broadly praising Trump's restraint. Scarborough also said that although Trump "lies," his lies were not "deadly," unlike those made by JFK and LBJ when they lied about the winnability of the Vietnam War. Those lies, said Scarborough, led to 57,000 American deaths.



An hour after he trumpeted Thursday’s abrupt end of the second U.S.-North Korea summit, CNN chief White House correspondent Jim Acosta appeared in need of a safe space following President Trump’s Hanoi press conference. Acosta wasn’t called on, so he aired his grievances on CNN while falsely suggesting the President had “steered clear largely” of the White House press corps.



Early Thursday morning in the United States, CNN gloated about the abrupt end of the Hanoi, Vietnam summit between President Trump and North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un with a potpourri of liberal bloviating. Such hot takes ranged from taunting Trump as a failure on North Korea, not understanding that the presidency isn’t like The Apprentice, suggested the Michael Cohen hearing hurt talks, and wondered how much longer Trump will be in office.



With the U.S./North Korea summit being conducted in Vietnam this week, CBS ended Tuesday’s edition of Evening News with a celebration of their efforts to help America lose the Vietnam War. Or as anchor Jeff Glor put it: it was “the realities of war, minus the fog.”



Jane Fonda has a new biopic being released on Netflix this week called Jane Fonda in Five Acts, so of course sat down for a tell-all with USA Today to talk about her life in the limelight, her struggles with insecurity, and that infamous anti-war photo prompting millions to dub her “Hanoi Jane” -- something she she says she deeply regrets.



On Friday's Real Time show, HBO host Bill Maher not only complained about what he called "patriotic bulls***" at national sporting events, but he also lauded former Secretary of State John Kerry as someone who "told the truth" about the Vietnam War, and gave him a forum to take credit for the program that fights AIDS in Africa without noting that it was President George W. Bush who pushed for its creation.



During Tuesday’s CBS Evening News, the network paid homage to their legendary broadcaster and former anchor Walter Cronkite on the 50-year anniversary of his liberal anti-war efforts during the Vietnam War. It was a celebration of the abandonment of journalistic objectivity and the rise of activist reporters no longer reporting the news but shaping it.



Have you been looking to close out your weekend with a program that is insufferable and self-satisfied beyond measure? Then, boy, does HBO have the show for you! Here and Now premiered February 11 with its pilot episode "Eleven, Eleven," which introduced us to the painfully enlightened Bayer-Boatwright family. If you wonder how much of a cliche the show is, it opens with a dude in a man bun riding his bike down the streets of Portland. Of course. 



CBS REALLY loves The Post. The journalists at CBS This Morning have now devoted 20 minutes and 48 seconds over the last month to promoting the Vietnam-era film about The Washington Post’s efforts to publish the Pentagon Papers. Unsurprisingly, the hosts at CBS really enjoy a movie that touts “non-partisan” reporters as “heroes” for exposing a Republican president. 



Leading off Tuesday’s Hardball, MSNBC host Chris Matthews seemed to insinuate a comparison between pro-gun advocates and the communist North Vietnam in a segment about gun control in the wake of Sunday night’s Las Vegas shooting. All the while, Matthews’s two assembled guests/so-called journalists mocked certain gun owners and bewailed the “gun culture” in America that they wished was the opposite.



"The highest patriotism is not a blind acceptance of official policy, but a love of one's country deep enough to call her to a higher plain." -- Sen. George McGovern (D-SD) Filmmakers Ken Burns and Lynn Novick have performed a vital public service in making their documentary "The Vietnam War" for PBS. Given the division that war caused in America, it is a pretty fair chronicling of the way things were half a century ago. The film brought back a lot of mostly bad memories to people of my generation.



Before becoming a newspaper columnist I was a broadcast news reporter for local TV stations and occasionally appeared on the NBC radio and television networks. I have some experience at being on the receiving end of hostilities directed at the media. At a pro-Nixon, pro-Vietnam war rally I covered in the early '70s, a demonstrator looked at the NBC logo on my microphone and called me a "communist." We had never met. He knew nothing about my politics or the quality of my reporting. He assumed that because I was covering the event for NBC I must be a left-wing radical.