The establishment press, which never seems to miss a chance to highlight conflict among Republicans and conservatives, is ignoring a major dispute involving two of the left's most prominent organizations: The SEIU and Planned Parenthood. The union has tried to organize workers at the Rocky Mountains affiliate of the nation's largest abortion provider. Planned Parenthood is not pleased with the unionization effort, and has run to — get this — the Trump administration's National Labor Relations Board in an attempt to stop it. None of this is news at national establishment press outlets, or even at the local Denver Post.



Protests by workers and activists and, in some cases, violence by anarchists marked the far-left holiday May Day this year.

But most American news consumers would not have known that some London demonstrators carried communist flags and banners of brutal Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin. They weren’t told that communists marched in Athens, Greece, or that anti-capitalist anarchists destroyed windows and threw Molotov cocktails in Paris.



At Slate.com on Friday, Felix Salmon called the Ford Motor Company "heartless" for its plans to phase out most of its car models, because "The losers, of course, will be the workers." Saturday, Ford responded that no jobs will be lost at its Chicago Assembly plant in converting it to light truck production. Salmon posted that response at the end of his column, but in three days he and Slate haven't changed their "heartless" — and baseless — assessment.



Looking at the grief Starbucks has received for problems with two patrons at a Philadelphia store, one might ask why current Executive Chairman and former CEO Howard Schultz didn't buy some media protection by purchasing a major newspaper. Fellow Seattle-area resident and Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos did that with the Washington Post in 2013. Amazon's alleged engagement in 21st-century sweatshop practices and union-busting has gone virtually unnoticed in the establishment press since Bezos bought the Post.



After a brief interlude, the New York Times is getting label-happy again, this time in its Supreme Court coverage. Beat reporter Adam Liptak on Tuesday covered the arguments in an important case involving free speech and government unions -- whether forcing workers to support public unions violates their First Amendment rights -- in “Newest Justice, Seen as Key Vote, Is Silent During Arguments on Unions.”



Friday, Fox Business's Maria Bartiromo interviewed Philip Jennings, General Secretary of the UNI Global Union, as he took a break from supposedly helping the downtrodden by attending the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Jennings whined that unions can't organize in America because of government and employer obstruction, and brought the host to a boil when he falsely claimed that 62 percent of the benefits of December's tax-cut legislation go to the top 1 percent.



It takes a special talent to spin news which is unquestionably positive into something negative. But Christopher Rugaber and Josh Boak at the Associated Press were up to the task in a Wednesday afternoon report on bonuses, pay raises, and other benefits which now have been showered on well over 2 million American workers since the December passage of federal tax cuts.



USA Today reporter Paul Davidson apparently doesn't understand that policies which help workers get hired and keep their jobs are more "worker-friendly" than those designed to line trial lawyers' pockets and help labor unions coerce companies into dealing with them. At least twice this year, Davidson, in his headlines and his content, has characterized moves by the federal government's National Labor Relations Board which have restored predictable economic order as "overturning" Obama-era regulations which were supposedly "worker-friendly," but really weren't.



ABC’s The Mayor has been leaning to the left more with each episode to the point where they openly advocate for left-leaning politicians. When that’s not possible, I guess they go for the next best thing: left-leaning supporters. This week, they remind us of the important and still totally relevant role of the union in society.



WASHINGTON -- Labor Day weekend passed with soggy weather in Washington. It was not as soggy as in other parts of the United States, but it kept me indoors most of the time, so I decided to give some thought to the one American president who I associate with Labor Day, Franklin Delano Roosevelt. To be historically correct, I should associate President Grover Cleveland -- a conservative Democrat -- with Labor Day, for he was the first to make it a national holiday. For some reason, it is associated with FDR -- at least in my mind.



On Tuesday morning, the Associated Press left no doubt that it does not want to see detailed news of the outrageous United Auto Workers-Fiat Chrysler training scandal spread beyond Metro Detroit. In an unbylined item which digested far longer reports seen at Detroit's major newspapers down to five paragraphs, the wire service kept the union out of its headline, failed to mention the union until the fourth paragraph, and omitted almost all of the details which caused a Chrysler financial analyst to plead guilty to his role in the conspiracy.



On Wednesday, NPR’s Illinois affiliate WGLT promoted a claim without pushback by a McLean County, IL superintendent named Mark Daniel that, if the state passed a school vouchers program, the Land of Lincoln would plunge back half a century into “segregation.” Illinois is in a heated battle led by Republican Governor Bruce Rauner to enact a voucher program to allow students to succeed, individuals like Daniel and the public sector unions have resorted to such scare tactics.