The Associated Press reported early Thursday that the bill which ended the government shutdown contains Obamacare-related tax cuts, indicating that Republicans got even more of what they've wanted as a condition for ending the government shutdown. The AP's Marcy Gordon seemed quite unhappy about all of this, as she whined about a projected increase in budget deficits that isn't even a rounding error.



The GOP tax bill has already led to millions of dollars in bonuses for American employees, but the benefits won’t stop there, according to global economic forecasts. The tax bill is also “expected to be responsible for about half of the upward revision to global economic growth over the next two years,” the International Monetary Fund (IMF) announced Jan. 22. The network evening news shows ignored that prediction.



The liberal media are so reluctant to give President Trump credit for anything positive his legislation achieves, that they will even keep silent when that legislation directly benefits them.



On Tuesday, Verizon announced that it would grant 153,000 of its 155,000 employees a bonus in the form of 50 shares of restricted stock (approximate value: $2,650), while Disney announced $1,000 bonuses for 125,000 of its cast members. Verizon also announced a significant increase in donations ($200-$300 million over the next two years) to its STEM education philanthropic effort, while Disney is "making a $50 million initial investment" (plus $25 million per year in future years) to help 88,000 employees cover college tuition costs. CNN Money's coverage of these developments still refused to fully acknowledge how unprecedentedly good the past five weeks' tax cut-driven news has been.



CNN political analyst, Playboy correspondent, and Sentinel Newspapers editor Brian Karem made a fool of himself during Tuesday’s White House briefing, suggesting to Gary Cohn that it’s “unfair” to give President Trump “credit” for the bounty of businesses announcing employee bonuses and new investments post-tax reform.



Dedicated tax-and-spend liberals often get help from the press in describing their plans to raid constituents' pocketbooks in vague terms, while nobly describing the alleged benefits of their plans to use the money. Washington's Democratic Governor Jay Inslee has the Associated Press running that kind of interference for his carbon tax.



New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio played make-believe during his Wednesday Morning Joe appearance, and everyone else present let him do so without challenge. Hizzoner's deepest dive into fantasyland was his contention that he can raise the money needed to repair and improve Gotham's decrepit subway system by "taxing millionaires and billionaires," which would only raise about 5 percent of the money needed.



Over the years, the dominant media have become infamous for touting Republicans who decide to support a Democrat for President. But on Wednesday's New Day, viewers got to see a rare example of the media highlighting the opposite in the form of a group of former Democrats in Ohio who switched parties, voted for Donald Trump, and still support him enthusiastically.

 



The GOP tax cuts scored yet another win on Wednesday when tech giant Apple cited the cuts as a driving factor for their newly announced plans to build a new campus, create 20,000 new jobs, and invest $350 billion in the U.S. economy among other exciting announcements. But despite the great news, NBC Nightly News and Spanish-language networks Univision and Telemundo failed to cover the story at all while CBS Evening News left out their praise for the tax cuts.



Reporters continue to concoct reasons to complain as more than 2 million American individuals and their families have suddenly become better off than they were three weeks ago. Even the news that the nation's largest retailer is raising its nationwide minimum wage while paying bonuses of up to $1,000 to every employee, and that an automaker is investing $1 billion in U.S. production, haven't moved cynics who refuse to concede the unconditional positivity in all of this.



It takes a special talent to spin news which is unquestionably positive into something negative. But Christopher Rugaber and Josh Boak at the Associated Press were up to the task in a Wednesday afternoon report on bonuses, pay raises, and other benefits which now have been showered on well over 2 million American workers since the December passage of federal tax cuts.



The City of Seattle probably didn't expect pushback from Costco, seen by many on the left as retail's "anti-Walmart," after its "sugary drink" tax of 1.75 cents per ounce went into effect January 1. But that is exactly what has happened. In moves the national press, which largely supports such taxes, has thus far ignored, Costco is itemizing the built-in cost of the tax on its Seattle store's shelf tags, and informing customers that they won't pay the tax if they shop at one of two other Costco stores outside Seattle's city limits.