Seth McFarlane isn’t content to undermine religion in just one episode of FOX's The Orville. He devotes 2 whole episodes of his 12 episode series to bashing religious beliefs. In tonight’s episode, tellingly titled “Mad Idolatry,” he calls religion a “poison.” Thursday’s episode had a religion develop around the Orville’s First Officer Kelly after she uses technology to heal a girl from a primitive alien culture. As a result, the planet begins to worship her as a deity, crucifying those guilty of “forsaking the word” of Kelly. In case the audience hadn’t caught on to the heavy-handed parallel to Christianity, one of the crucified characters shown is made to resemble Christ.


Are tax cuts anti-God? New York Times religion reporter Laurie Goodstein again celebrated a protest movement by the religious left (while chiding the religious right) in “50 Years Later, New Push to Magnify Plight of Poor.” The text box: “A plan to mount large protests on 40 consecutive days," keyed to the new tax bill that in Goodstein's words, "mainly benefits corporations and the rich."


Two years ago, I noted The Washington Post couldn’t find any staffers or any space to cover the closing of Amethyst Health Center for Women, the abortion clinic near my home in Manassas, Virginia. And now, the Post again could not find space when this former abortion clinic was blessed by the local Catholic bishop Michael Burbidge as the new Mother of Mercy Free Clinic. To pro-lifers, it felt like a modern miracle, decades of prayer answered.


Director Scott Derrickson has a funny way of ringing in a national holiday. Derrickson’s resume includes a number of respected films including The Exorcism of Emily Rose (2005) and Sinister (2012). That changed when he co-wrote and directed the 2016 smash Doctor Strange. The MCU entry shook up the superhero formula just enough to score big with critics and fans alike.


Rarely has the idiom "virtue is its own reward" looked better than it does in light of the sex scandals sweeping the nation. The so-called "prudishness," of a previous generation and the respect most men were once taught to have for women -- and which Hugh Hefner and his disciples of "free love" mocked -- are looking better with each passing day. Conservatives have been told they can't impose their morality on others, so how is its opposite working out for individuals and the culture?


As with most streaming shows of late, at least the ones that try to be edgy (which means pretty much all of them), it takes a minute to process what you’ve watched sometimes. Such is the case with Netflix’s Lady Dynamite which so far tops the list of confusing and bizarre streaming shows.


If you wanted to hear some terrible hot takes on immigration, religion, and race, look no further! TNT's drama Major Crimes has you covered, and you only have to watch one scene to get it all.


Just three days after running a "Style" story celebrating the sexualizing of pre-pubescent boys lathered in makeup, The New York Times gave precious space to an op-ed which told readers that the "Unexamined Brutality of the Male Libido," i.e., another phrase describing "toxic masculinity," is creating a "crisis." Actually, it's been examined and addressed by civilizations and cultures for centuries. The reason it's a serious problem now is that modern culture has rejected many mechanisms once in place to keep it under control.


SMILF continues its attack on Christianity in the November 27 episode "Deep-Dish Pizza & a Shot of Holy Water," but this particular episode of the Showtime series takes it to another level when it's suggested, less than a month before Christmas, that the Virgin Mary's Immaculate Conception of Jesus Christ was rape.


In a Wednesday morning tweet, Matthew Dowd of ABC News, the network's chief political analyst, demonstrated once again that he can be counted on to cling to views diametrically opposed to common sense, as he for all practical purposes resurrected the dishonest defense Democrats used to save Bill Clinton's presidency in the late-1990s. Dowd's version, tweeted today in reaction to sex harassment and assault scandals which are predominantly affecting DC Democrats, predominantly liberal establishment media icons, and predominantly liberal Hollywood celebrities, is that "there is a difference between those who are flawed who work for the common good and those who are flawed who could care less about the common good."


The New York Times jabbed at Christians and conservatives in two articles Saturday related to museum exhibitions. Emily Cochrane nitpicked the new Museum of the Bible in Washington, D.C., while an art critic looking at a Paris exhibit on the history of Christians in the Middle East suggested the French populist Marine Le Pen was as bad as the jihadists of ISIS.


Fearing that America was one step closer to becoming a theocracy with the opening of the privately-funded Museum of the Bible in Washington D.C., on Thursday and Friday, CBS This Morning and NBC’s Today hyped the supposed “controversy” swirling around the institution, even claiming that a “cloud of suspicion” hung over the building as it opened its doors.