On Monday's News One Now, far-left host Roland Martin began his show by complaining because last week NewsBusters accurately reported that he ignored the high-profile shooting death of a white woman by police officers in Minneapolis, even while updating his viewers on cases involving blacks who were also killed by police officers. As he finally got to the case of Justine Damond, he gloated about a prediction he previously made that "the only way this thing was going to change is when somebody white got shot and killed." He then boasted: "Oh, how a brother was right."


NewsBusters previously reported how the New York Times news pages gushed over “Auntie Maxie,” also known as liberal Democratic Rep. Maxine Waters. Liberal journalist Ana Marie Cox’s obsequious interview in the July 23 Times Sunday Magazine portrayed Waters as a hero to the young and hip, and proved the paper’s propaganda for liberal politicians can’t be limited to just one section: “Maxine Waters Is Learning From Millennials.”


In the season two premiere of HBO's Insecure, we have two big liberal themes: the wage gap myth and slavery reparations.


On Sunday's PoliticsNation, after MSNBC legal analyst Paul Butler incorrectly claimed that a "majority" of those killed by police officers are "people of color," host Al Sharpton later reiterated that it "usually" happens to "people of color." In fact, according to statistics compiled on police killings for 2015 and 2016, for those cases in which the victim's race has been identified, more than half those killed were white.


On Friday morning's News One Now, host Roland Martin repeatedly ranted over the 33-year sentence that O.J. Simpson received almost a decade ago, even as the far-left commentator admitted he believes Simpson was indeed guilty of the prior offense of murder that he was acquitted of in 1995. After complaining that the judge in the 2008 armed robbery case had been "shameful" and "despicable," he charged that "white folks can't get over O.J.," leading one guest to provocatively mock whites because they lost a "precious white woman and a precious white man" who were killed by the former NFL star.


As all the major news networks this week have highlighted the tragic case of Minnesota bride-to-be Justine Damond being shot to death by a police officer, far-left News One Now host Roland Martin -- who sometimes appears on MSNBC -- has conspicuously given no attention to the story even while continuing to update viewers on high-profile cases of blacks being killed by the police.


The Women's March movement has received fawning and forgiving establishment press attention, particularly from the Associated Press and New York Times, since its first official event the day after President Donald Trump's inauguration. Now the movement appears to be (or at least should be) self-immolating for several reasons, most recently its unapologetic support for a 1970s convicted cop killer. That controversy has even pulled in the Black Lives Matter movement, which has also received consistent and undeserved favorable press treatment, also exposing BLM once again as consistently, violently radical. Now the AP and the Times aren't covering either group's direct association with this controversy.


On the Monday edition of his eponymously named PBS show, host Tavis Smiley provided a forum with little pushback for author and American University Professor Ibram Kendi to claim that the social problems that disproportionately exist within America's black population are the result of continuing racial discrimination, and that those who do not agree with his conclusions therefore must believe blacks are "inferior."


Too many people believe that slavery is a "peculiar institution." That's what Kenneth Stampp called slavery in his book, "Peculiar Institution: Slavery in the Ante-Bellum South." But slavery is by no means peculiar, odd or unusual. It was common among ancient peoples such as the Egyptians, Babylonians, Assyrians, Hittites, Greeks, Persians, Armenians and many others. Large numbers of Christians were enslaved during the Ottoman wars in Europe.


New York Times film critics A.O. Scott and Jason Zinoman remember horror zombie master George Romero on the front of Tuesday Arts page, “Old Master of Horror -- In George Romero’s signature zombie films, the living make for their own fright show.”


On Sunday's PoliticsNation on MSNBC, during the show's regular "Gotcha" segment, host Al Sharpton was imagining racist dog whistles as he complained about "unmitigated, racially-tinged cruelty" from Congressman Steve King, and suggested that those who think like the Iowa Republican are "evil."

 


You can’t disagree with the left anymore without some sort of ulterior motive ascribed to you. After all, if you were a good person, you would think like them.