You got 37 days for it to go away, Joe . . .  On today's Morning Joe, Joe Scarborough said of Elizabeth Warren's candidacy, "am I the only person in America who thinks the Native American controversy is something that probably will not last into the spring?"



The self-appointed "Justice Journalist" of the New York Daily News' sports staff, Chuck Modiano, went ballistic about white privilege in the NFL. While mentioning the white race 29 times in less than flattering terms, he claims the so-called black-balling of Colin Kaepernick is due to economic racism, and says the majority of NFL owners are incompetent Trumpian clones who are selling whiteness to a white fan base.



Rapper Cardi B virtue signalled HARD on Friday prior the Super Bowl, making sure to let the media know that she was actually approached to perform during the halftime show. But because she’s such a living saint, she told the associated press that she declined performing and “sacrifice[d] a lot of money” in tribute to Colin Kaepernick.

 


While some in the cable news media have been direct and professional in their calls for Virginia Democratic Governor Ralph Northam to resign (with others ghoulishly connecting Northam to, among others, the Covington kids and Justice Kavanaugh), CNN briefly mislabled Northam Friday night as a Republican while airing video of his so-called apology for his racist medical school yearbook page. 



Here we go again. If you think the manure-spreaders of sensationalism who masquerade as ethical practitioners of journalism learned anything from last week's MAGA-bashing Covington Catholic High School hoax, I have three words for you: Ha, ha, ha. On Tuesday morning, uncorroborated claims by actor Jussie Smollett that he was the victim of a “brutal” hate crime by Trump supporters in Chicago went viral across social media.



Rush Limbaugh’s December 2018 Limbaugh Letter has an article titled “Demonizing White Men.” It highlights -- with actual quotations from people in the media, academia and the political and entertainment arenas -- the attack on white men as a class. You can decide whether these statements are decent, moral or even sensible. Should we support their visions? Don Lemon, a CNN anchorman, said, “We have to stop demonizing people and realize the biggest terror threat in this country is white men, most of them radicalized to the right, and we have to start doing something about them.”



In reference to efforts to teach black children, the president of the St. Petersburg, Florida, chapter of the NAACP, Maria Scruggs, said: “The (school) district has shown they just can't do it....Now it's time for the community to step in.” That's a recognition that politicians and the education establishment, after decades of promises, cannot do much to narrow the huge educational achievement gap between Asians and whites on the one hand and blacks on the other.



Malcolm X was a Muslim minister and human rights activist. Born in 1925, he met his death at the hands of an assassin in 1965. Malcolm X was a courageous advocate for black civil rights, but unlike Martin Luther King, he was not that forgiving of whites for their crimes against black Americans. He did not eschew violence as a tool to achieve civil and human rights. His black and white detractors accused him of preaching racism and violence. Despite the controversy, he has been called one of the greatest and most influential black Americans.



Much is made about observed differences between sexes and among races. The nation's academic and legal elite try to sell us on the notion that men and women and people of all races should be proportionally represented in socio-economic characteristics. They make statements such as “Though African Americans and Hispanics make up approximately 32 percent of the US population, they (constituted) 56 percent of all incarcerated people in 2015" and “20 percent of Congress is women. Only 5 percent of CEOs are.



How appropriate would it be for a major publicly held American company to hire a person with a history of having publicly made the following statements and many others like them? (In the interest of brevity, I shall list only four.) “The world could get by just fine with zero black people.” “It's kind of sick how much joy I get out of being cruel to old black men.” “Dumbass f---ing black people marking up the internet with their opinions like dogs pissing on fire hydrants.” “Are black people genetically predisposed to burn faster in the sun, thus logically only being fit to live underground like groveling bilious goblins?”



It's sobering how much race dominates the public discourse today. But as long as we're discussing stereotypes, we should note that leftists and elites are the ones obsessed with race, not the flyover Neanderthals to whom they impute this evil. Give it a rest, eggheads. Leftists can scarcely discuss any issue without injecting this toxicity. They imagine it everywhere -- the ubiquitous boogeyman that validates their perpetual vilification of conservatives.



To The Atlantic's Saahil Desai, college sports have too much of the wrong complexion. As a matter of fact, he writes, college sports at elite schools are really an "affirmative action" program for rich white kids.