Monday was Chris ‘Fredo’ Cuomo’s first night back at the helm of Prime Time after a viral video exposed him threatening to throw a guy down a flight of stairs after getting mocked. Fredo held off saying anything about what happened until the end of his show. There was no apology to the guy or to Italian-Americans for the false claim he peddled suggesting “Fredo” was an “ethnic slur”. Instead, there was cockiness and laughter from him and fellow CNN host Don Lemon.



In a Monday front-page story “Amid the Kale and Corn, Fears of White Supremacy at the Farmers’ Market,” New York Times journalist Patrick Healy sounded the alarm about how a farmer’s market in a “heavily white, liberal town of 85,000 that is home to Indiana University” have been fearing for their lives after it was discovered that a couple selling “tomatoes and kale were also white nationalists.”



Megan Rapinoe is still milking the spotlight with her “unapologetic” gayness, hatred for Donald Trump and — forgive me for almost forgetting — her success as a female soccer player. Giving another smug interview with the UK’s The Guardian, the purple-haired, goal-scoring SJW got to preach on about how cool she is and how anyone who doesn’t get it, like the president in particular, is lame and might “need therapy.” After all, she “deserves this.”



Byron York at the Washington Examiner reports The New York Times is embarking on a very ambitious crusade to define slavery as the dominant narrative of America, even to this day .The project was launched with an entire edition of The New York Times Magazine loaded with left-wing essays on slavery's everlasting effects.



The "public charge" doctrine has been a foundation of American immigration policy going back hundreds of years to colonial times. The notion is that immigrants who are unable to support themselves, thus becoming public charges, should not be admitted or permitted to remain. In 1996, Congress enacted a federal immigration law codifying the public charge principle, and it has remained on the books in the same form ever since. So what do you call the Trump administration's plan to enforce that law? If you're a Trump-hating leftist like MSNBC contributor Fernand Amandi, it is nothing less than: "a white-supremacist, domestic-terror campaign targeting people of color."



On Friday's Real Time show on HBO, liberal host Bill Maher called out both anti-Israel liberals and the media for ignoring the deeply embedded anti-Semitism in the Middle East that has thwarted attempts to make a peace agreement between Israel and Palestinian Arabs.



Ed Whelan at National Review objected on Friday to a Rachel Maddow segment on MSNBC Thursday night strongly implying that Trump judicial nominee Steven Menashi is a white nationalist based on a paper he wrote on "Ethnonationalism and Liberal Democracy." Menashi was writing about Israel -- and yet the word "Israel" never passed Maddow's lips



Well, it’s been a month, but FX’s Snowfall is back to give us another pointed racial jab all the way from the 1980s. This time, it’s all of America that comes off as racist, not just cops. At least we can finally spare with the niceties.



On Tuesday, we noted PolitiFact linked to The Washington Post and FactCheck.org declaring Senators Kamala Harris and Elizabeth were factually wrong to claim Michael Brown was "murdered" by policeman Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Missouri five years ago. On Wednesday, PolitiFact's Louis Jacobson took on the fact-check....and then proclaimed they would NOT put this lie on their "Truth-O-Meter."



There is discrimination of all sorts, and that includes racial discrimination. Thus, it's somewhat foolhardy to debate the existence of racial discrimination yesteryear or today. From a policy point of view, a far more useful question to ask is: How much of the plight of many blacks can be explained by current racial discrimination? Let's examine some of today's most devastating problems of many black people with an eye toward addressing discrimination of the past and present.



On Nicolle Wallace's MSNBC show on Monday, the question was whether it would be good political strategy, given President Trump's alleged racism, to accuse the Trump base of being racists for supporting him. Frank Figliuzzi, an Obama-era FBI official and NBC National Security Analyst, said such would be a mistake, because: "if you call Trump followers racist en masse, they simply coalesce around each other and become more defensive and protective of the leader, just as they would in, say, a terrorist organization."  



We wouldn't normally evaluate a "fact check" when it lines up with all the available facts. But it can be noteworthy when Democrats are tagged as "Four Pinocchios" False. Both the Washington Post Fact Checker and FactCheck.org flagged Senators and presidential candidates Kamala Harris and Elizabeth Warren for incorrectly claiming Michael Brown was "murdered" in Ferguson, Missouri by police officer Darren Wilson.