After thinking that having a seven-hour-long town hall about climate change was a great idea, CNN returned Thursday night with a four-and-a-half hour town hall partnering with the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) about LGBTQ issues. Rampant protests calling attention to black transwomen, Chris Cuomo joking about preferred pronouns, and flat-out abuse with transgender elementary-age children were just a few of the things that transpired. 



Entertainment empires are turning to artificial intelligence to prevent offensive scripts from heading to the big screen. Actress and activist Geena Davis announced that her new digital tool, “GD IQ: Spellcheck for Bias,” will partner with Disney Studios, which includes ABC News and 20th Century Fox.



Mixed-ish just aired its third episode Tuesday night, and "Let Your Hair Down" has proven to be just as politically correct and woke as the rest of the season has been. In this episode we learn that "neat" can be added to the list of innocuous words that have been deemed racist.



Over the past couple of weeks, the dominant media have displayed a classic example of their double standard in deciding which police shootings are worthy of coverage and which are less so. The networks that repeatedly hype stories that give the wrong impression that nearly all police shooting victims are black -- even though about 75 percent are either white or Hispanic -- recently gave substantial attention to the trial of a white female police officer who killed an innocent unarmed black man, Botham Jean.



CBS's All Rise continues trying to be the wokest series on television. The third episode, "Sweet Bird of Truth" which aired on Tuesday would be better titled "Sweet Bird of Political Correctness." Aside from a cyberspace felony hacking case, the episode focuses primarily on Luke, our hero bailiff. Luke is randomly attacked by two policeman on his morning jog to work.



Liberal producer Chuck Lorre’s new show Bob Hearts Abishola has been vying to be one of the worst new sitcoms on television. This weeks’ episode, “A Bird May Love a Fish,” on October 7, once again utilized racist tropes aimed at whites, blacks and immigrants while also taking a dig at Fox News.



Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives are pushing HR 40, a bill calling for a commission to study and develop reparation proposals for African-Americans. Burgess Owens, an African-American, former NFL player and now a Fox News contributor, testified against this bill in June and, a few days ago, he appeared in an opposition video on Prager University.



On Friday's New Day show, liberal CNN contributor Bakari Sellers was in a bad mood over the sight of Brandt Jean speaking of forgiveness and hugging Amber Guyger, the woman convicted of killing his brother, Botham, after she entered his apartment and shot him, thinking she was in her own apartment. Sellers declared that it "infuriates me" and "drives me crazy" as he claimed that forgiveness by blacks toward whites has not been "reciprocated." He also complained about Judge Tammy Kemp hugging Guyger, saying that even though the judge is black, she is "part of an oppressive system."



In the Washington Post October 4, Geraldo Cadava and Stephen Pitti admonish Americans: “Don’t just say you love Latinos during Hispanic Heritage Month. Honor the complexities of our histories.” As to the first part, well, you got it. I won’t say I love Latinos -- no matter what month it is -- because I don’t. Nor do I hate them. Truth is, I’m indifferent to Latinos, as I am to Africans, Koreans, Slavs and Skandinavians. Anglo-Saxons?



The pilot for CBS’s new series Evil last week was interesting to say the least. The show followed an agnostic forensic psychologist and a budding priest investigating the validity of supernatural events, and yet, religion wasn’t maligned every few minutes. But in the second episode, all that goodwill was spent on morally ambiguous priests and a cry of "implicit racism."



On Wednesday night, the Daily Caller News Foundation’s indefatigable Luke Rosiak reported that the local journalist instrumental in promoting the hate crime hoax involving an African-American girl with dreadlocks has some serious ethical issues, including how she had previously promoted the hair care company run by the girl’s family.



During my student days at a UCLA economics department faculty/graduate student coffee hour in the 1960s, I was chatting with Professor Armen Alchian, probably the greatest microeconomic theory economist of the 20th century. I was trying to impress Alchian with my knowledge of statistical type I and type II errors. I explained that unlike my wife, who assumed that everyone was her friend until they prove differently, my assumption was everyone was an enemy until they proved otherwise. The result: My wife's vision maximized the number of her friends but maximized her chances of betrayal. My vision minimized my chances of betrayal at a cost of minimizing the number of my friends.