Several recent polls, plus the popularity of Sen. Bernie Sanders, demonstrate that young people prefer socialism to free market capitalism. That, I believe, is a result of their ignorance and indoctrination during their school years, from kindergarten through college. For the most part, neither they nor many of their teachers and professors know what free market capitalism is.



The press has mostly gone off the rails in covering President Trump's proposal to rescind $15 billion in unspent funds, insisting on characterizing the move as "cuts." The competition for the worst coverage is fierce, but Andrew Taylor's story at the Associated Press, as carried at the Washington Post, probably wins the prize for the most incoherent headline: "Administration proposes cutting $15 billion in unused funds."



In a bipartisan vote on Thursday, the House passed a truly massive omnibus spending bill spanning 2,232 pages and some $1.3 TRILLION. The spending increases that the bill called for would help to jack up our already out of control $21 TRILLION national debt. But for both ABC’s World News Tonight and CBS Evening News, the bigger concern was that there was no solution for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. Meanwhile, NBC Nightly News didn’t mention the spending bill at all.



Another day, another left-wing report hammering the Republican tax plan on the front page of the New York Times, this time in the lead section on Sunday. Kate Zernike and Alan Rappeport penned one of a pair of lead stories on the Republican’s passing their tax plan in the Senate, under a headline that didn't even nod toward objectivity: “Next Objective: Cutting the Safety Net.”

 



Liberal New York Times economics reporter turned leftist economics columnist Eduardo Porter is appalled that Americans refuse to go along with confiscatory tax rates like the rest of the civilized world, and suggested racism is part of the problem, in Wednesday’s “Considering the True Cost Of Keeping Taxes Lower” on the front of the Business Day section. And reporter Alan Rappeport continued his snotty and quite selective concern about deficit spending, now that Republicans are threatening tax cuts.



On Monday’s Morning Joe, the panel brought on liberal economist Jeffrey Sachs to talk about the Republican tax reform bill currently making its way through Congress. Somewhat predictably, Sachs used his platform to attack the plan as a form of “theft,” the “biggest heist in history,” and a plot by America’s “richest gazillionaires” to “bankrupt” the country for their own personal enrichment. Although the panelists repeatedly tried to get Sachs to say something sane about the Republican plan’s corporate tax cuts, he instead insisted on reverting to his talking points and never explained how letting people keep more of their own money is “theft.”



Where would we be without the efforts of government spending? At least $20 trillion less in debt, but that never seems to occur to the more left-leaning politicians. Meanwhile, CBS’s Madam Secretary takes the time to remind the viewers about how necessary everyone and everything employed by the government can be.



In a series of bizarre comments on Monday’s Morning Joe, Joe Scarborough made the case that the recent Values Voter Summit in Washington D.C. had no true conservatives present. In order to support this assertion, Joe extensively used liberal talking points, including ones about the GOP’s tax reform plan. Joe ended up claiming that Trump’s administration might raise the national debt up to $35 trillion, a statement for which he provided no evidence.



Like the changing of the seasons, the front of Wednesday’s New York Times featured journalists suddenly rediscovering the national deficit, at least when Republicans are threatening to cut tax rates: “G.O.P. Senators Embrace Plan For Tax Cut That Adds to Deficit.” Such sudden concern for deficits tend to occur among journalists during Republican presidencies or whenever Republicans threaten tax cuts. Reporters Alan Rappeport and Thomas Kaplan led off by insinuating Republican hypocrisy: "Senate Republicans, abandoning a key fiscal doctrine...." Yet Sanders' budget-busting "Medicare for All" proposal didn't trigger the Times' delicate deficit sensibiliites.



What just happened? President Trump cut a deal with Democrats to pay for hurricane damage relief and raise the debt ceiling without getting anything in return, except the temporary avoidance of a government shutdown. How to describe this? Was it a sellout, or a pragmatic act? It's football season again, so let's call this deal the "option play." It isn't used much by today's professional players, but the play is designed to give a quarterback the option of running the ball, or, if he sees he can't make it through the defensive line, toss it to a player trailing behind him in an effort to gain yards.



On Wednesday's Deadline: White House program on MSNBC, host Nicolle Wallace wondered if Republicans are "reaping what they sowed" from supporting Donald Trump for President, and suggested that GOPers have so far not been showing "a conscience and a soul" in standing by the President.



Monday’s CBS This Morning was broadcast live from the White House’s East Room and while there were plenty of fun, historical, and nonpartisan segments on various rooms inside the White House, the liberal bias didn’t receive a day off as the co-hosts pushed Trump advisor Gary Cohn from the left on the President’s tax plan.