PolitiFact's kid-gloves treatment of prominent Democrats is on display again. Twitchy noted ultraliberal Sen. Kamala Harris drew a rare evaluation, but of course, the ruling was "Mostly True." PolitiFact has only evaluated Harris nine times -- five Mostly True, two True, and two Half True (and one of those was Democrat-on-Democrat warfare).



California is king when it comes to environmental regulations, but the latest decision to mandate solar panels comes at a high price. For homeowners.

Those costs of freedom of choice and almost $10,000 higher construction expenses per home didn’t matter much to California’s proponents of solar panels or the liberal media which downplayed costs and critics when they mentioned them at all.



On Wednesday, the California Energy Commission adopted "standards requiring solar systems for new homes" beginning in 2020. Kathleen Ronayne at the Associated Press published a virtual press release celebrating the move, and presented woefully incomplete information about the alleged financial benefits of this unelected body's latest move.



While interviewing Rep. Jeb Hensarling (R-TX) Tuesday morning, New Day co-host Chris Cuomo slammed a proposal that would roll back some of the Dodd-Frank regulations passed in response to the 2008 financial crisis.

 



The front page of Sunday’s Los Angeles Times looked like a perfect example of curated liberal bias. The dominant story on the top left was an outraged editorial from columnist Steve Lopez, on homelessness in the city. “CEASELESS CRISIS,” it screamed. Another story on homelessness sat on its right. Below, there was a gushy feature on an openly gay Olympic skier, and another gushy feature on Stormy Daniels, a porn star who allegedly had an affair with Donald Trump ten years ago. 



One reason Democrats seem so fixated on importing illegal immigrants and allowing their children to stay and become citizens may be the exodus from high-tax and traditionally Democratic states. Anecdotal evidence is usually not helpful in determining trends, but when stories begin to accumulate and sound the same attention must be paid. Two friends of mine, who are longtime California residents, recently decided to move from that highly taxed state to states with lower taxes.



The Associated Press has suddenly discovered that homelessness is a serious problem in the nation's three West Coast states of California, Oregon, and Washington, and that the problem merits national attention. How convenient — and how tardy.



Appearing as a guest on Friday's All In with Chris Hayes on MSNBC, former New York Times executive editor Jill Abramson slammed the Donald Trump administration's accomplishments so far as a "debacle" and declared that the Republican budget has "savagely" taken money from poverty programs and education. Abramson: "I think both of the scenarios, Chris, that you just laid out equal debacle because, you know, he has done quite a bit, but I think what he's done has been, you know, altogether damaging both to the country and internationally. ... A budget that has savagely taken money from housing programs from the poor, federal money for the schools."

 



Before White House press secretary Sean Spicer threw down with reporters over President Trump’s wiretap claims on Thursday, Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Director Mick Mulvaney faced left-leaning questions on the President’s budget that included fears people will “suffer” as a result of the conservative proposals.



In his first remarks this week to Housing and Urban Development (HUD) employees, Secretary of HUD Ben Carson called slaves “immigrants,” that had hopes for the American Dream, comments that sent the media in an uproar. From print to television to social media, journalists and celebrities alike condemned the remarks as extremely offensive. Yet the media forgot that former President Obama has also compared slaves to immigrants, and not just once, but several times.



During his Senate confirmation hearing, Dr. Ben Carson, secretary of Housing and Urban Development-designate, told a story. He said his mother was a domestic who cleaned beautiful homes. One day she asked him if he would rather live in those nice houses or the house in which he and his brother lived in Detroit. She told him that only he could decide the type of home he would eventually live in by how much he studied in school and the choices he made for his life.

 



Esquire’s Pierce readily concedes that Ben Carson (“an elite neurosurgeon”) and Mike Pompeo (“graduated at the top of his class at West Point”) are smart guys. In a way, though, they’re also tragic figures, he suggests, since they’ve “had to tailor their politics and their public personae to cater to the anti-rational, theocratic, anti-intellectual Id of modern conservatism…This means that both Carson and Pompeo have long histories of saying and writing things that sound like transmissions coming through their molars from Planet X.”