Remember the first outbreak of PC years ago? Back then it was a distant, isolated phenomenon -- an exotic STD localized to college campuses. Reality, like a dose of penicillin, would take care of things. Normal people had fun changing “bald” to “follically challenged,” and “hookers” to “horizontal laborers.” Good times.



The liberal bastion of Los Angeles hasn’t had a Republican mayor in office since 2001. Yet, according to Democratic Mayor Eric Garcetti, and the silence from NBC Nightly News anchor Lester Holt, the city’s exploding homelessness problem was getting worse due to “conservative cuts to programs.”



Near the end of its evening newscast Telemundo, NBC’s Spanish-language affiliate network, recently had the temerity to treat its viewership to two and a half minutes of good news. Three cheers for a buoyant economy in which Latinos make up 63% of new homeowners in the United States.



We no longer live in a constitutional republic. We live in an idiocracy. Only in modern-day America, under the Democratic-controlled U.S. House of Representatives, is the basic proposition that federally subsidized public housing should benefit American citizens and legal residents slammed as “despicable” and “damaging.” Those are the hysterical words used by Democratic Rep. Carolyn Maloney of New York City to condemn the proposal discussed by Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson on Tuesday to ban government aid to residents of HUD who shelter illegal immigrants. 



WASHINGTON -- Homelessness is up for the second year in a row. That is no surprise to me. I spent the last few days in New York City, where it seems the homeless are as numerous as the tourists. They are everywhere. Not that they are not numerous in our nation's capital, too. I returned to Washington by the train, and there are areas of Union Station that are as populated with homeless people as the nearby shelter. The scenes are appalling. What can be done for these poor wretches?



PolitiFact's kid-gloves treatment of prominent Democrats is on display again. Twitchy noted ultraliberal Sen. Kamala Harris drew a rare evaluation, but of course, the ruling was "Mostly True." PolitiFact has only evaluated Harris nine times -- five Mostly True, two True, and two Half True (and one of those was Democrat-on-Democrat warfare).



California is king when it comes to environmental regulations, but the latest decision to mandate solar panels comes at a high price. For homeowners.

Those costs of freedom of choice and almost $10,000 higher construction expenses per home didn’t matter much to California’s proponents of solar panels or the liberal media which downplayed costs and critics when they mentioned them at all.



On Wednesday, the California Energy Commission adopted "standards requiring solar systems for new homes" beginning in 2020. Kathleen Ronayne at the Associated Press published a virtual press release celebrating the move, and presented woefully incomplete information about the alleged financial benefits of this unelected body's latest move.



While interviewing Rep. Jeb Hensarling (R-TX) Tuesday morning, New Day co-host Chris Cuomo slammed a proposal that would roll back some of the Dodd-Frank regulations passed in response to the 2008 financial crisis.

 



The front page of Sunday’s Los Angeles Times looked like a perfect example of curated liberal bias. The dominant story on the top left was an outraged editorial from columnist Steve Lopez, on homelessness in the city. “CEASELESS CRISIS,” it screamed. Another story on homelessness sat on its right. Below, there was a gushy feature on an openly gay Olympic skier, and another gushy feature on Stormy Daniels, a porn star who allegedly had an affair with Donald Trump ten years ago. 



One reason Democrats seem so fixated on importing illegal immigrants and allowing their children to stay and become citizens may be the exodus from high-tax and traditionally Democratic states. Anecdotal evidence is usually not helpful in determining trends, but when stories begin to accumulate and sound the same attention must be paid. Two friends of mine, who are longtime California residents, recently decided to move from that highly taxed state to states with lower taxes.



The Associated Press has suddenly discovered that homelessness is a serious problem in the nation's three West Coast states of California, Oregon, and Washington, and that the problem merits national attention. How convenient — and how tardy.