The New York Times retains its bizarre obsession with the left-wing hobbyhorse of “income inequality.” Former economics reporter Binyamin Appelbaum, who betrayed liberal viewpoints in his reporting, is now free to issue unadulterated left-wing opinions from his perch on the paper’s editorial board. His latest Sunday Review piece suggests “Blame Economists for the Mess We’re In.” It began with a history lesson on how the government got over its distaste for economists in prominent positions, while getting off the paper’s latest mean-spirited crack at Nobel winning economist Milton Friedman.



An unexpected update of the classic Monopoly game sparked an argument between liberals and conservatives because it lampooned socialism. Hasbro’s new Monopoly Socialism board game spawned a viral Twitter argument as well as a defense from Sen. Ted Cruz, R-TX. The packaging calls it “a parody of the classic,” and says “winning is for capitalists” and “what’s yours is ours.” Rutgers history professor and Japan historian Nick Kapur called it “mean-spirited and woefully ill-informed” as he launched a series of tweets about the rules and language of the new version of the game.



On Thursday afternoon, MSNBC anchor Ali Velshi excitedly touted the new $16 trillion climate change plan put out by 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders and excused the massive price tag by lecturing viewers that “there’s a price to not doing anything or to doing too little.” He then brought on left-wing activists to further justify the extreme policy proposal.



The next recession could bring an economic “revolution,” according to left-wing New York Times tech columnist Farhad Manjoo. He argued that when it arrives it would be “time to go full Elizabeth Warren” because of inequality.

Insisting that “a recession looms,” Manjoo fueled envy against CEOs and the wealthy — the very kind of envy that could spur such a “revolution.” Although he attached Democratic candidate Warren’s name to that kind of “radical” change, spouting off about revolution calls to mind other names like Marx and Lenin.



In a story for the New York Times front page Tuesday, “Shareholders Rule No More, C.E.O.s Pledge,” business reporters David Gelles and David Yaffe-Bellany conceded all the left-wing arguments about the evils of big business and roasted Nobel laureate free-market economist Milton Friedman as an avatar of greed: "This mind-set informed the corporate raiders of the 1980s and contributed to an unswerving focus on quarterly earnings reports. It found its way into pop culture, when in the 1987 movie “Wall Street,” Gordon Gekko declared, 'Greed is good.'"



During a press gaggle early Wednesday afternoon outside the White House, President Donald Trump absolutely tore into CNN, NBC News, The New York Times, and particularly NBC's Peter Alexander as “an organ of the Democrats” who’s “the most biased reporter” that he makes NBC News less credible than CNN. Yikes. That one’s gonna leave a mark! Alexander first poked at Trump with a question about a debate whether to let the G-7 return to being the G-8 by allowing Russia back in following their annexation of Crimea and support for separatists occupying eastern Ukraine.



Yes, it´s true. People over 55 years of age are prospering across the nation. But so are Latinos - and as one Hispanic investment ace tells us, they are not the only ones, much to the chagrin of the liberal Spanish-speaking media that continue to make a case for an ailing economy about to crash and for Donald Trump to be deep-sixed.



In just three nights of coverage, ABC, CBS and NBC evening newscasts spent more than 11 minutes talking about the threat of recession and economic worries mostly tied to one economic signal. The main reason for concern was that the yield on a particular short-term versus long-term Treasury bond inverted (generally long-term bonds have higher yields) and spooked investors on Aug. 14. This sent the Dow down by more than 800 points.



CNN host Don Lemon joined his liberal panelists in ganging up on his one conservative guest on Monday night’s CNN Tonight over the idea that the economy was doing well. Rob Astorino of President Trump’s re-election campaign argued that the media was pushing a false narrative put out by Democrats that a recession was near, but the economy was actually stable. But the liberals at CNN insisted he was wrong, with one analyst even calling that idea a conservative “conspiracy.”



On Fox and Friends Monday, the hosts brought on Fox Business host Charles Payne to comment on how the media is now openly hoping for an economic recession under President Trump. Payne called the media’s newest obsession a “deliberate” attempt to derail the good economy under Trump, and argued there was “no economic data” to suggest a recession was near.



On Monday, all three network morning shows kept rooting for recession as a way to harm President Trump’s 2020 reelection chances. Hosts and correspondents dismissed the White House “attempting to downplay growing concerns that the U.S. economy could be headed for a recession” while touting Democrats “seizing the moment.”



Real Time host Bill Maher doubled down on his desire for a recession Friday night. Maher has expressed his wish for a recession multiple times; hoping that an economic downturn would lead to President Trump losing his bid for a second term in the White House.