Over the past week, strict gun laws in Connecticut have been repeatedly touted on CNN as an example to be enacted nationally, with New Day host Alisyn Camerota pushing the laws the most frequently. The simplistic narrative has been promoted that there has been a "direct correlation" between the passage of new gun control in 2013 and lower numbers of homicides and violent incidents seen in the state the years since. But no mention has been made of the fact that two of the three most populous cities in Connecticut experienced a doubling of homicides in 2017 meaning that, after the numbers for the entire state are tallied, there will likely be a substantial increase in the state's total number of homicides from the previous year's levels.


On Tuesday's New Day, CNN host Alisyn Camerota not only did her part to spread misinformation about how easy it is to purchase an AR-15, but she also defended liberal activist Cameron Kasky's decision to demonize the NRA as a "terrorist organization," suggesting that "calling out the NRA" in such a way "might be effective." She also got into an unusually heated debate with conservative CNN contributor Jack Kingston as she badgered and repeatedly showed derision toward the former Republican congressman's conservative views on guns.


On Tuesday's Early Start, there was one more example of the contempt that journalists have for the NRA as CNN anchor Dave Briggs praised gun control activist Cameron Kasky as "an eloquent young man" after a clip of the liberal student activist pushing for more gun control in which he in part ranted that the NRA is a "terrorist organization" that gives "blood money" to politicians.

 


Tuesday at the Louisville Courier Journal, part of Gannett's USA Today network, two reporters claimed that whoever vandalized a prominent billboard in that city to read "Kill the NRA" had "called out" the gun-rights group. David Harten and Darcy Costello never described the billboard as what it was while it was briefly visible: a violent threat.


On New Day Sunday, as the show touted the group of liberal students holding a rally to promote gun control in response to the Florida school shootings, CNN correspondent Rosa Flores at one point repeated without question the claim by one student that it is "more difficult" to "plan for a weekend" than it is to get an "automatic weapon or semi-automatic weapon." 

 


On New Day Saturday, CNN anchor Victor Blackwell gave a group of five students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School a forum with little pushback to not only advocate more gun control, but to accuse Republicans of being the ones who "murdered" the victims at their school in Parkland, Florida. CNN even used a clip of one student repeating discredited claims that "There's been 18 mass shootings in schools this year," as she complained that "I didn't hear about them."


On Thursday, several MSNBC anchors at various times of day were fixated on how NRA spending had benefited a number of prominent Republican political figures who had tweeted out sentiments regarding "thoughts and prayers" after the Florida shootings. After MSNBC host Stephanie Ruhle first raised the issue Thursday morning and spent almost three minutes listing and showing images of nine Republicans who had benefited from NRA spending, fellow hosts Katy Tur, Ali Velshi and Brian Williams followed her lead later in the day anchoring their regular shows.


On Thursday's Velshi and Ruhle on MSNBC, as the entire show was devoted to the school shootings in Florida, host Stephanie Ruhle repeatedly mocked opponents of gun control as she listed nine prominent Republicans on screen who have tweeted condolences for the victims with the MSNBC host noting how much money the NRA has spent supporting each of them. She went on to declare that a hunter who needs an AR-15 to hit a target must be a "lousy loser" and then seemed to make a veiled hint that those who resist new gun laws are "jerks."

 


On Wednesday, a Global Opinions Editor at the Washington Post praised the work of Christopher Steele as "extraordinarily prescient," created by a man who "had stumbled onto a breathtaking threat to U.S. national security." Accordingly, Steele, per the headline at Christian Caryl's opinion piece, "is a hero – and Americans owe him their thanks" — a Four-Pinocchio claim by the Post's own standards.


Today's story out of Miami occupies the sweet spot in the Venn diagram comprised of Univision's anti-Catholicism and its strident LGBTQ advocacy, far from the mainstream of the network's viewership. The network pulled off a neat trick- casting aspersions on longstanding religious freedom protections while slyly advocating for the proposed law that would destroy them.


On Friday, CNN's Evan Perez insulted Congress as people who "don’t have any idea how the law works" relating to surveillance, claiming that "grave harm ... was done by the release of the Republican (Nunes) memo even though it was a dud." How interesting, given that Perez knows, because he reported it in 2013, that Obama administration committed abuses serious enough to warrant an October 2011 FISA Court rebuke. Additionally, the now-FBI-defending Perez should know that in October 2016, the Obama administration admitted that it never changed its ways.


A tale of two speeches: On Thursday, the New York Times Sheryl Gay Stolberg celebrated House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi’s marathon speech, “8 Hours, 7 Minutes and 1 Pelosi Soliloquy.” While not wholly laudatory, Stolberg fawned over Pelosi’s "heart-rending" defense of the so-called Dreamers. Sen. Rand Paul also delivered a delaying tactic of a speech, but Rand isn't nearly so highly regarded at the Times, accused of "bemoaning" and "sloganeering."