New York Times reporter Katrin Bennhold’s front-page story commemorating the fall of the Berlin Wall, “Still Chipping Away at a Wall Demolished a Generation Ago,” contained an incredibly ignorant paragraph about the freedoms of East German women: "Eastern women, who were part of the work force and with free child care, were more emancipated than their western sisters...." But it's far from the worst Times story celebrating the former East Germany.


As Venezuela plunges deeper into humanitarian crisis, the broadcast and cable networks barely recognize its existence, while the print press, which during relatively tolerable times routinely celebrated the country's socialist government, is more reluctant than ever to use the S-word. Of six articles I found Friday afternoon about the horrid, deteriorating situation in that country, only one used the word — and that was only because it was about snap elections de facto dictator Nicolas Maduro has called for April.


In a breathtaking, unhinged display apparently triggered by President Donald Trump's well-received State of the Union address, Counterpunch Editor Jeffrey St. Clair outrageously mocked invited guest, double amputee, and North Korean defector Ji Seong-ho as "Korea's version of Tiny Tim who brought his own crutches."


New York Times media reporter John Koblin took note of a media skirmish between current NBC host Megyn Kelly and “Hanoi Jane” Fonda in Business Day: “In Echo of Fox Days, Kelly Lashes Back at Fonda.” Guess who the Times goes after? Both the headline and Koblin’s text treat Kelly like the attack-dog aggressor regrettably reverting to Fox News-style form, even though Kelly clearly has Fonda dead to rights as a hypocrite regarding the star’s willingness to discuss her plastic surgery.


The front of the New York Times Sunday Travel page featured some pretty blatant bias by omission, courtesy of contributor Tony Perrottet, on the late Cuban dictators Fidel Castro -- a whitewashing of Communist history well-suited to the paper’s Red Century series of articles that left out the brutal history of Soviet and Chinese communism. The headline over the story, which covered three-quarters of the front of the Travel section: “A Cuban Island That Has Played Both Paradise and Prison.” The subhead: “The Isle of Youth -- which has been both a Communist Utopian getaway and home to a brutal prison that housed Castro for a time -- is a world apart, even by Cuban standards.”


It seems someone at CBS thought it was a good idea to send correspondent Mark Phillips all the way to Germany and do a full report about the Berlin Wall just to suggest that all walls are bad, and therefore undermine President Donald Trump's push for a border wall, as well as Israel's security barrier which has likely saved thousands from being murdered by suicide bombers.


As 2017 draws to a close, Univision took one last opportunity to spotlight one of the network's new favorites: Carmen Yulín Cruz, the radical separatist mayor of San Juan, Puerto Rico.


On Wednesday, The New York Times closed out a shameful year-long campaign to whitewash and rehabilitate the legacy of communism by publishing yet another op-ed praising the Soviet Union. In spite of having spent ten years travelling throughout Russia talking to people about their family histories and memories of the Soviet period, writers Olga Shevchenko and Oksana Sarkisova were apparently unable to find any relatives of the more than 20 million people who were murdered during the course of political purges, forced collectivization, or starvation genocide. Instead, they mostly focused on those with pleasant memories of living under the totalitarian regime’s nightmarish police state.


With the passage of the Republicans’ $1.5 trillion tax cut bill looming, most of Wednesday’s Morning Joe was devoted to portraying the legislation as not just bad policy (which would be par for the course on MSNBC), but a threat to America’s survival, prosperity, and democracy. “Conservative” co-host Joe Scarborough put on his Marxist cap to make the case that “the greatest threat to American-styled capitalism [is] income disparity.”


Any list of the year's most ignored news stories has to include Venezuela's frightening deterioration. This once reasonably prosperous South American nation is now in the grips of a brutal socialist de facto dictatorship which is moving inexorably to consolidate its control, accompanied by an utterly wrecked economy. Families cannot feed their children, and many are dying. The New York Times broke through the near-blackout on Sunday, but failed to mention the root cause of the nation's humanitarian catastrophe — socialism — until the third-last of over 100 paragraphs.


On Monday’s Morning Joe, co-host Joe Scarborough and his band of liberal misfits devoted a full segment of the show’s second hour to accusing Fox News journalists of trying to “inspire hatred that will lead to the killing of Americans.” How is Fox supposedly doing this? Well, in the minds of Scarborough and his fellow MSNBC pundits, Fox News hosts and guests who have compared Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation of the Trump administration to an attempted “coup” and the FBI to the KGB are trying to inspire a Timothy-McVeigh-style attack on the Bureau through their heated rhetoric. Joe and company failed to explain how their own repeated comparisons of Trump to Soviet and communist mass-murderers like Joseph Stalin would be substantively different from what Fox’s commentators have said recently.


Appearing as a guest on Friday's New Day on CNN a year after Fidel Castro's death to promote his film about Castro's Cuba, filmmaker Jon Alpert blamed the United States for the economic failures of communism on the island country as he charged that the U.S. ruined the Cuban economy by flooding the sugar market in the 1970s.