To see just how out of touch some in the liberal media are, look no further than Billy Graham. On Wednesday, world-famous Christian evangelist Billy Graham passed away at the age of 99. While Americans, former U.S. presidents and many in the media mourned his death, several journalists took to Twitter to celebrate Graham’s death by hoping he was enjoying hell.

 

Christianity is routinely mocked by the media. So when they show only reverence for a Christian televangelist, that’s no small feat.


The Media Research Center on Wednesday announced a campaign to hold ABC's advertisers accountable for the anti-Christian bigotry spewed on The View. We are encouraging our grassroots army to call The View’s sponsors and let them know how upset you are about a show that smears Christians as “dangerous” and “mentally ill.” 


As of Monday morning, the Media Research Center and its grassroots members made over 25,000 calls lambasting ABC and demanding a full apology for anti-Christian comments made by The View on February 13 that suggested Vice President Mike Pence’s “dangerous” Christian faith was a “mental illness.”


HBO's Here and Now continues to try to set the gold standard for being the most obnoxiously woke show on television. In its premiere last week, we met the main family, the Bayer-Boatwrights, who are made up of an academic, some kind of a counselor (we will see more in this week's episode), and their children adopted from around the world in a show of how "progressive and evolved they are."


Thursday on ABC’s The View, the whole table addressed host Joy Behar’s mockery of Mike Pence’s Christian faith on Tuesday’s show that caused an uproar. Even though the rest of the table, with the exception of Meghan McCain and to some extent Whoopi Goldberg, also made vile comments, ABC only brought up Behar’s comments as controversial.

 

In a sit-down interview with Axios on Ash Wednesday, Vice President Mike Pence told investigative journalist Mike Allen that he was upset to hear about The View’s callous remarks about his faith on their show earlier this week.


In addition to being anti-business, Comedy Central’s new show Corporate is also anti-religion. On Wednesday’s episode, Casual Friday, Hampton Deville’s CEO announces, “We all know there's no God, but there is a ton of money to be made in His name,” in anticipation of meeting with power/money-hungry Glorious Salvation Ministries representative Alyssa Armstrong. CEO Christian Deville meets with the cross-bearing representative of the largest group of mega-churches in the country to discuss how Hampton Deville will furnish them with flat screens, massage chairs, and snacks, in return for the corporation’s logo being broadcasted all over the churches. Or as Alyssa puts it, “Every time my congregants go to pray, they'll be thinking of the Father, Son, Holy Spirit, and Hampton f*cking Deville."


Tuesday on The View, the liberal hosts displayed a sudden respect for fired White House staffer Omarosa Manigault, after the controversial figure took her fame to reality television to spread malicious gossip about the Trump White House. With the exception of Meghan McCain, the hosts touted Omarosa’s supposed “leaks” about Vice President Mike Pence’s “scary” Christianity on CBS’s Celebrity Big Brother this week, as gospel-truth.


Just like she did last week, ABC anchor Amy Robach tried to bring left-wing activism into her coverage of the Winter Olympic Games on Good Morning America, February 12. From Pyeongchang, South Korea, Robach sat down with Olympic athlete Adam Rippon and immediately asked what message the openly gay skater he had for Vice President Mike Pence.


LifeSiteNews reported the Episcopal church in the diocese of Washington DC quickly passed a resolution to stop using "gendered language for God" at the Diocese's 123rd Convention. The resolution stated: “If revision of the Book of Common Prayer is authorized, to utilize expansive language for God from the rich sources of feminine, masculine, and non-binary imagery for God found in Scripture and tradition and, when possible, to avoid the use of gendered pronouns for God.” Somehow The Washington Post missed this vote for an "expansion" of God.


On Wednesday's Good Morning America, ABC correspondent Linsey Davis tried to link President Donald Trump to a controversial religious figure in a way that it is unlikely that the news show would do if it involved a Democratic President instead. Near the end of a report updating viewers on the unusually bad flu season, Davis showed video of evangelist Gloria Copeland suggesting that it was not necessary to get a flu shot, alleging that prayer could prevent the flu, before the ABC reporter identified her as "an advisor on the President's evangelical board."