Secret City: Under the Eagle, the second season of Netflix's Australian political drama released March 6, portrayed Americans as lying to their allies, droning their friends, and not caring if innocent people are hurt or killed in the process. This season finds reporter Harriet Dunkley (Anna Torv) investigating a cover up in the Australian government. When an explosion at a suburban home kills four people, it is initially blamed on a gas leak, then on the family's teenaged son, who survived. The truth, as it turns out, is far more sinister and, of course, the Americans are involved.



Reporting from Sydney, New York Times Australia bureau chief Damien Cave provided a conservative-mocking “news analysis,” “Coal Lobby Turns Up Heat, and Australia Wilts Under Climate Change.” The text box reproached the country: “A progressive nation remains in thrall to the energy industry.” The online headline: “Australia Wilts From Climate Change. Why Can’t Its Politicians Act?” In Cave's mind, Australia is throwing away its wonderful left-wing history for the devolutionary “circus” of global-warming skepticism.



Here’s a newsflash for conservatives: Scientists in Australia have completed a recent study showing that people with an anti-gay bias tend to exist at the lower end of the intelligence spectrum. In other words, if you’re not down with gay and everything that goes with it, not only are you less open-minded, but you’re a big dum-dum too.



CANBERRA, Australia — Here in Australia, "Question Time" has long been one of my favorite exercises of parliamentary democracy. The prime minister and government ministers appear before other elected members in support of their policies, while the opposition asks pointed and sometimes funny questions in an effort to belittle those policies.



NBC went all-out against President Donald Trump’s foreign policy during Thursday’s edition of Nightly News. They knocked Trump for getting tough with Iran, pretended he didn’t get tough with Russia, left out key parts of favorable quotes, and repeated dubiously sourced ones. “In these early days of his administration, President Trump is signaling a willingness to take the tough approach over traditional diplomacy no matter the country,” quipped anchor Lester Holt, handing it off to Hillary Clinton-super fan Andrea Mitchell. 



It would appear that Yuri Kageyama at the Associated Press has fallen into the trap of believing the rubbish her employer and much of the rest of the world's press has been pushing about how the world's economies really aren't performing all that poorly, that this "new normal" world isn't all that bad, and what we are seeing is all we have a right to expect.

You see, Kageyama doesn't understand why the world's stock markets are tanking when there is so much "data showing economies on the mend."



In what certainly won’t be the latest case of irony in the liberal media, Tuesday’s CBS Evening News immediately pivoted from a full report on surging gun sales in the United States following mass shootings to a piece prominently touting Australia’s massive gun control and confiscation initiatives carried out in the 1990's.



New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof quickly found something else to blame for the killing of two journalists besides the actual killer: America's gun culture, while glossing over the killer's mental disturbance. Kristof is notorious for using tragedies for political gain, like he did after the Boston Marathon bombing, and after the 2011 assassinations in Tuscon.



"I think this guy has a lot more, a lot different motives than religion driving him. And he finally found a way, anyway, to express himself in his end as he died." 

That was how Hardball host Chris Matthews closed a December 15 roundtable discussion segment about Sydney hostage-taker Man Haron Monis. Earlier in the segment, Matthews seemed perplexed as to why Americans would fear a similar incident happening on American soil, arguing that essentially such an incident would be no more or less rare than a school or workplace shooting motivated by non-religious factors.



In a scathing article for the Los Angeles Times on Sunday, reporter Robyn Dixon slammed Australia as “The adolescent country. The bit player. The shrimp of the schoolyard.” She contemptuously added: “For Australians it's not so bad – most of the time – to be so far away, so overlooked, so seemingly insignificant as to almost never factor in major international news. The lifestyle makes up for it.”



John Fund at National Review has written about three recent elections that show “Liberals In Retreat,” but only one is domestic: the Colorado gun-rights recall. The other two liberal defeats were in Norway and Australia.

A quick Nexis search demonstrated that ABC, CBS, and NBC all skipped the conservative victories in Norway and Australia -- but all three found time for news briefs in 2007 when Labor prime minister Kevin Rudd was elected in Australia on an anti-Iraq war platform. Meanwhile, lighter-than-air "Good Morning America" on ABC did find "news" Down Under when it came to trickle-down celebrity updates on Michael Jackson's daughter:



On Tuesday, liberal stalwart NPR hyped a BBC World Service poll that found that "if the world picked U.S. president, election would be a blowout" for President Obama. Writer Eyder Peralta's item, which was the number-one most-viewed on its website, spotlighted that the poll "taken in 21 countries...found for the most part, foreign countries preferred Obama. The only exception was Pakistan where more people said they preferred Romney."

The BBC poll, conducted between July 3 and September 3, found that the most strongly pro-Obama country, to no one's shock, was France, with 72 percent of respondents supporting the incumbent Democrat. The second highest pro-Obama country was Australia, followed by Kenya, Nigeria, and Canada.