The eighth season of Shameless kicked off on November 5 with one character being extra patriotic, and the show as a whole being more political. “We live in a world in which everybody is talking about what’s happening,” executive producer John Wells told Variety. “I have very liberal tendencies, but the one thing you can say about what is happening is it’s started a conversation. There is a conversation in America about ‘Who are we? Who do we want to be? How did we get so separate? Why are we not talking to each other?’ And we try and go right at it.”



I had very low expectations of SMILF, and the November 5 premiere “A Box of Dunkies and Two Squirts of Maple Syrup” lived down to every one of them. In only 30 minutes, the show fit in more crass content than most shows do in years on the air. Since there was no real theme to said content, aside from "gratuitous,"  I think it's best to introduce you to this show simply by walking you through the first episode. 



SEAL Team on CBS is starting to become a reliably pro-American, pro-military show in a television landscape that doesn't give us much to enjoy. In the October 25 episode "Collapse," the drama portrayed American service members respectfully as those doing good in the world and liberals as, well, ridiculous.



Three NewsBusters posts on Thursday documented attacks by far-leftists and members of the media on Trump administration Chief of Staff and retired General John Kelly's reaction that afternoon to Florida Democratic Congresswoman Frederica Wilson's accusation that President Donald Trump, during a private phone call to the widow of fallen soldier La David Johnson, "disrespected" him. 



In addition to CNN, liberal activists, actors, journalists, and trolls disturbingly berated and maligned the character of John Kelly following his Thursday Whtie House remarks, declaring him to be an “odious” “coward” and “nitwit” offering a “bizarre,” “dishonest,” and racist statement amidst the Gold Star family controversy.



Just when you thought CNN couldn’t cheapen itself any further, it did, folks. On Thursday, CNN Newsroom reacted to a powerful White House statement Chief of Staff and Gen. John Kelly (Ret.) amidst the Gold Star families controversy by noting Kelly’s personal sacrifices before lambasting him for calling out a Democratic member of Congress and attacking the media.



The new CBS series SEAL Team has had its questionable moments, but the October 18 episode "Ghosts of Christmas Future" shared some important truths about the world. Main character and SEAL Team leader Jason (David Boreanaz) and his wife Alana (Michaela McManus) are at their son's school meeting with both his principal and counselor when the principal shares his P.C. education philosophy.



MSNBC’s The 11th Hour host and serial liar Brian Williams debased himself once again, showing a tinge of anti-Americanism on Wednesday by declaring that the U.S. was “the only nation on Earth to have set off nuclear weapons in anger” and deemed itself to be “the arbiter of who else gets to have them on the planet.”



I had hopes for SEAL Team being one of the rare pro-America shows on the air. The October 4 episode "Other Lives," however, portrayed many of our Navy SEALs, one of our country's most elite fighting forces, as immoral and anti-American. Only team leader Jason (David Boreanaz) was consistently the voice of truth, justice and the American way throughout the episode.



NBC’s Great News premiered its second season on Thursday, September 28, with an introduction of a new, main character, Diana St. Tropez (Tina Fey), head of the fictitious news program “The Breakdown” that the show centers around. The episode, titled “Boardroom Bitch,” also introduced a lot of politics along with Fey’s new character.



The newly inflamed controversy over National Football League players protesting the National Anthem and American flag in the name of social justice landed New York Times’ sportswriter Juliet Macur on Tuesday’s front-page: “N.F.L. Players Knelt for Justice, But They Need a Lasting Stand.” Taking sides, Macur pushed for the protest to evolve, as evidenced by the story’s text box: “Shifting focus from Trump’s comments to issues of injustice.” The subhead to colleague Ken Belson's story attacked N.F.L. owners as " a group consisting largely of white, conservative billionaires has done little to address social injustice or head injuries."



When Islamic extremists attack a military awards ceremony on a primetime television show, you can bet that within a few episodes it will be made clear that the suicide-vested attackers shouting “Allahu Akbar” will be absolved. The terrorism was just an act, theater for the witnesses and victims meant to distract the populace from the real attackers. In Shooter, the real perpetrator is our very own government—and possibly the United Nations.