Ignoring the $9 Trillion Cost, MSNBC Lectures: Climate Change Isn’t ‘Partisan’

Listen to the Article!

MSNBC’s Ali Velshi on Friday and Monday lectured viewers that climate change isn’t a “partisan” issue. Instead, anyone who “breathes” should endorse the efforts to save the planet. This, of course, ignores the multi-trillion price tag for many of the Democratic plans to solve global warming. 

Talking to former Democratic presidential candidate Jay Inslee on Monday, Velshi insisted, “You have long believed that this shouldn't be, [that]  governors can be very influential in changing, with respect to climate change. And that this shouldn’t really be partisan.” 

On Friday’s climate conference, the MSNBC host told candidate Tom Steyer: 

This has sometimes felt like a business versus people argument. It sometimes felt like a Democrat versus Republican argument and it should be neither of those things, right? Everybody who breathes and drinks and eats and lives should be largely on the same side. We can disagree as to what the remedies are but we shouldn't be disagreeing about what it is.

 

 

How are these climate plans NOT controversial? The Green New deal is estimated to cost $10 trillion. According to the conservative free market Heartland Institute, Inslee’s own climate plan would cost the average American household $75,000

Additionally, imagine if pro-lifers defiantly insisted that abortion isn’t political. That it’s a non-partisan life issue. Would MSNBC simply let that pass? Not likely. 

Playing a clip from last week, the MSNBC journalist used alarmist language as he talked with 2020 Democrat Andrew Yang:  “What's the thing that it looks like to you to make sure that everybody understands that this is an emergency?” During the interview with Inslee, Velshi plotted strategy with the Washington State governor: “How do you want Democrats to keep this ball rolling?

Good thing this isn't partisan. 

A transcript of Monday’s questions are below: 

MSNBC Live
9/23/19
3:19

ALI VELSHI: Climate change is literally the top of the agenda for the world leaders in New York U.N. General Assembly. Today, dozens of leaders spoke at the Climate Action Summit and pledged to prevent a warming world of reaching even more dangerous levels. But they conceded that the efforts so far have not been enough. President Trump was expected to skip the event but he didn't. He stopped by for about 15 minutes. The President who has said climate change is a hoax explained why he shoed up. 

DONALD TRUMP: Big believer in clean air and clean water and all countries should get together and do that. And they should do it for themselves. Very, very important. 

VELSHI: The U.N. Summit comes days after a dozen democratic and one Republican presidential candidate took part in Climate Forum 2020 at Georgetown university in Washington. They answered questions from Chris Hayes and me and from college students from around the country about what they would do to fight climate change if they were in the White House. Washington governor Jay Inslee made climate change the central issue of his campaign before dropping out last month. While he was not at the forum, his name came up a few times. What's the thing that it looks like to you to make sure that everybody understands that this is an emergency? 

ANDREW YANG: Well, first, head of a EPA that believes in the EPA, believes in climate change. That's day one. Secretary of Energy that has the same vision that I have, that our new leadership will have about where we need to go. I think the climate change czar is a good idea. You know? Maybe Jay Inslee, I’m sure he’d love that role. 

VELSHI: Who do you reach out to immediately when you become president to get this done. 

MARIANNE WILLIAMSON: I think probably a big argument between 49 states and Washington State. It's going to be, “We want Jay Inslee.” “No. We want Jay Inslee.” “No, we want Jay Inslee.” So Jay Inslee is probably going to have a big decision to make. 

VELSHI: Washington governor Jay Inslee joins me now. Clearly you've had an impact on the race. You know? We are sorry you couldn't have been there. 

JAY INSLEE: Right. 

VELSHI: But you have a number of candidates pointed to you as a guy who made this thing central to the discussion. What does it look like to you now? How do you want Democrats to keep this ball rolling? 

...

VELSHI: I'd like to point out Bill weld a Republican did show up to this thing and conservatives from Georgetown who attended. You have long believed that this shouldn't be —  governors can be very influential in changing with respect to climate change and that this shouldn’t really be partisan. 

...

VELSHI: What do you make of Donald Trump? At the G-7 he said he's the biggest environmentalist you have ever met and said he likes clean air and clean water. But all countries should do it for themselves. It is like he figured outlines to use to make him not say climate change is a hoax which he said in the past but talking about clean air and clean water is a piece of the very big pie on climate. 

...

VELSHI: Why do you think he showed up at this thing? Because he definitely does not — he is not the biggest environmentalist we ever met. 

...

MSNBC Live
9/20/19
3:21 PM ET

VELSHI:  This has sometimes felt like a business versus people argument. It sometimes felt like a Democrat versus Republican argument and it should be neither of those things, right? Everybody who breathes and drinks and eats and lives should be largely on the same side. We can disagree as to what the remedies are but we shouldn't be disagreeing about what it is.

NB Daily Global Warming MSNBC Video Ali Velshi Jay Inslee Tom Steyer
Scott Whitlock's picture


Sponsored Links